Samsung is using a little Disney magic to hide the hole

first_img Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. Samsung and Disney have teamed up to offer Galaxy S10 users a series of background wallpaper options that make use of the placement of that front-facing camera.The Infinity-O display, which negates the need for a notch by using a punch-hole design for the selfie cam, isn’t everyone’s cup of tea. So, after some users in the community developed some attractive ways of lessening its impact on the overall aesthetic of the phone, Disney and Samsung have moved to launch some official options.The free wallpapers feature characters from hit Disney and Pixar films like The Incredibles, Zootopia and Frozen. They work by using the cut-out as a prop or or by making it part of the character itself, for example Mickey Mouse’s ear or Olaf the snowman’s top button. For the Zootopia wallpaper, it’s part of the wheel of a car.Related: Samsung Galaxy S10In a recent blog post, Samsung writes: “One of the groundbreaking innovations the Galaxy S10 line features is its full-screen experience, made possible by the Infinity-O Display that covers, bar the camera hole, the entire front side of the device. Thanks to precise laser cutting techniques, the camera has been tucked away into the right hand side of the display to eliminate distractions for a cinematic viewing experience.“Since the launch of the Galaxy S10 line, many eye-catching and creative wallpaper designs have emerged. Users themselves have been creating and sharing their own background wallpapers custom-designed for the Galaxy S10’s Infinity-O Display, taking advantage of its unique design, camera hole placement and the impressive screen real estate on offer.”The wallpapers only work for the Galaxy S10e and Galaxy S10 phones, but don’t pair well with the pill-shaped cut-out on the S10 Plus flagship device. Samsung say it’ll expand the options for Infinity-O background wallpapers in the future.It’s interesting that the Disney options are free because Samsung usually charges users for themes following a 14-day trial. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editorlast_img read more


Intel 10th gen 10nm Ice Lake processors shipping in time for Christmas

first_imgIntel has announced that its long-awaited 10th gen of processors, aka Ice Lake, are now shipping, meaning the first systems should be ready in time for Christmas.New Ice Lake processors will range from Core i3 to Core i7 models, will feature up to four cores and eight threads, and will turbo up to 4.1GHz while integrated Iris Plus graphics will boost up to 1.1GHz.They follow a following a 10nm (namometre) manufacturing process, which is significant, because it means that Intel has finally perfected a process which allows them to make more transistor-dense components. Previous generations of processors, like the Whiskey Lake line announced last year, followed a 14nm process. Smaller components mean that more of them can be fit onto a chip, so in theory, Ice Lake CPUs ought to offer performance several orders of magnitude above older chips.Related: Intel Ice LakeIntel has famously struggled to move beyond the 14nm process with previous generations of processor updates, so the fact that they’re now, finally, ready to ship Ice Lake CPUs will be welcome news to long-suffering PC part pickers.Intel says that Ice Lake chips will also allow for thinner and lighter laptops and 2-in-1s, like the mystery XPS Ice Lake model Dell’s President of the Client Solutions Sam Burd (pictured) flashed us a glimpse of back at CES 2019.Ice Lake processors will use Intel’s DL Boost (deep learning boost) tech to accelerate low latency AI workloads. A discrete component, called the Gaussian Network Accelerator (GNA) is also built into the SoC, and this will apparently do all the lifting for low-power AI usages, freeing up the other processor cores, working, presumably, in a similar way to how Huawei’s Kirin chips have done on phones like the P30 Pro.But with rivals AMD already using a 7nm process for their processors, including the 3rd gen Ryzen chips announced yesterday, it might be the case that Intel’s latest advances leave some would-be buyers cold.Full specs, capabilities and indicative prices for Ice Lake CPUs have yet to be announced – Intel’s keynote speech at Computex 2019 is now underway. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editorlast_img read more


WWDC Live Stream Watch the Apple keynote online right now

first_imgWWDC Live Stream: How to watch Apple’s WWDC 2019 keynote onlineToday’s the day, Apple fans – WWDC 2019 kicks off tonight, and our guide reveals all the ways you can live stream the big opening keynote. Whether you’re using iOS, macOS or Apple TV, or Edge, Chrome or Firefox on Windows, here’s all you need to know to watch Apple’s WWDC live stream.This year’s WWDC is taking place at the McEnery Convention Center in San Jose, California. The conference runs right up until June 7, but tonight’s keynote is when the biggest announcements will be made.Check out our WWDC 2019 hub for everything we’re expecting Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editor We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time.center_img This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. Today’s the day! Tune in at 10 a.m. PDT to stream the #WWDC19 keynote address at https://t.co/yLa2e4Xr2R.— Apple (@Apple) May 31, 2019How to watch Apple’s WWDC live streamApple’s WWDC 2019 keynote kicks-off at 10am PDT, which is 6pm in the UK. It’s expected to run for approximately two hours, and the live stream is being hosted on the Apple Events website.While the link above is the only one you need to tune in, there are a few caveats you need to know about if you want to follow all the WWDC action as it happens.To watch the WWDC keynote on a Mac or iOS device, you’ll need to use Apple’s native Safari browser and be running macOS Sierra 10.12 or higher, while iOS phones and tablets will need to be on iOS 10 or above.Those of you wanting to live stream WWDC 2019 on a Windows device can do so, provided you’re using Microsoft’s Edge browser, which of course means only Windows 10 devices are capable of tuning into today’s Apple event.Apple also says Chrome and Firefox users will be able to tune in, as long as you’re using “recent versions” of either of the two browsers.Lastly, Apple TV owners can watch the WWDC keynote, provided their box is 2nd-gen or better and they’ve got the Apple Events app installed. Those with older Apple TVs will see ‘Apple Events’ as an option on their device’s home screen.Those are all of the easiest ways to watch the WWDC 2019 live stream − enjoy the event!last_img read more


BoC upbeat about outlook as it leaves rates unchanged but will proceed

first_img Recommended For YouTrade worries drag on China shares; Hong Kong down 0.5%JGBs gain as sliding stocks boost demand for safe-haven bondsDollar slips as U.S. yields decline on risk aversionStocks wobble on trade, earnings unease; US Treasury yields fallOnline bank N26 extends latest funding round in expansion push Stephen Poloz’s statement on the rate hold: “The degree of accommodation being provided by the current policy rate remains appropriate.”Sean Kilpatrick / Canadian Press The Bank of Canada said the oil sector is “beginning” to recover and that weakness in the housing market appears to be isolated to a few regions. Evidence indicates that consumer spending and exports have picked up, and “overall business investment has firmed,” the statement said.And then there are those impressive hiring numbers. Employers created more than 100,000 new positions in April, the most on record. The data are volatile, but the central bank has concluded that companies wouldn’t be taking on new workers at this rate if the economy was going off the rails.“Continued strong job growth suggests that businesses see the weakness in the past two quarters as temporary,” the statement said.The U.S.-China trade war makes forecasting with confidence impossible because the rules on which standard economic models and theories are built don’t apply to Trump and China’s form of state-directed capitalism.So orders will be determined by geopolitical considerations rather than factors such as quality and price, according to Angelo Katsoras, geopolitical analyst at National Bank. International companies may need multiple supply chains to avoid the web of tariffs and sanctions that the U.S. and China have deployed. And a settlement wouldn’t be an automatic gain for a country such as Canada, which has benefited to some degree from China’s tariffs on American farm goods. Any agreement likely would involve U.S. agriculture exports, which could hurt Canadian farmers.The Bank of Canada reiterated that interest rates will be guided by data, especially indicators that shed light on what’s going on with household spending, oil prices and trade policy.Poloz and his deputies have seen enough to assure themselves that they aren’t fighting a recession. But they will proceed extremely cautiously because Trump and China still could trigger one.• Email: kcarmichael@postmedia.com | Twitter: CarmichaelKevin Comment The Bank of Canada is feeling pretty good about the economic outlook, all things considered.Policymakers left the benchmark interest rate unchanged at 1.75 per cent on May 29, noting that the escalation of Donald Trump’s trade war with China “is heightening uncertainty about economic prospects.”That was expected, as economic growth essentially stalled at the end of 2018 and was struggling to rebound early in the new year. An expression of worry about a new round of tit-for-tat tariffs between the world’s largest economies also was expected.Canada’s non-energy exports already were weak. Anything that hurts global demand, or makes it more difficult for Canada’s relatively uncompetitive exporters to find new markets, would deny the economy a lift from international sales. The International Monetary Fund estimates the row between the U.S and China will erase 0.3 per cent from global gross domestic product in the short term. Markets are more gloomy about our economy than the Bank of Canada — who’s right? Trudeau government gives formal notice it intends to ratify new NAFTA China’s trade war threat to withhold rare earths from U.S. would inflict ‘devastating’ blow “The degree of accommodation being provided by the current policy rate remains appropriate,” the Bank of Canada said in a statement.Related Stories:Bank of Canada puts rate firmly on hold as global trade war damage risesCanadian inflation dips to 2.0% in June, hitting central bank targetBank of Canada content to leave rates unchanged, frets about trade war damageAside from trade, policymakers say the world was unfolding much as they expected last month, when they slashed their forecast for economic growth in the first quarter to an annual rate of 0.3 per cent, while predicting a rebound to a rate of 1.3 per cent in the current quarter. The central bank said there is “accumulating evidence” that the slump was temporary, just as it thought.That note of assurance restores a bit of the swagger the Bank of Canada lost when it failed to anticipate the severity of last year’s slowdown.Stephen Poloz and his deputies on the Governing Council were gradually taking interest rates higher last year, when the economy hit a wall. Oil and real estate prices plunged in fourth quarter and household spending sputtered. Policymakers retreated to the sidelines, unsure if the economy was ready for higher interest rates.They remain unsure, as there is no indication in the new statement that policymakers are ready to resume their path back to a more normal interest-rate setting.At the same time, there is nothing to indicate that an interest-rate cut was on the table over the past couple of weeks as the Governing Council assessed the outlook. That could surprise some people. Prices of assets geared to short-term interest rates suggest that some investors are betting economic conditions will force interest rates lower this year. The central bank doesn’t appear to see things going that way.“The bank isn’t moving,” Darcy Briggs, a portfolio manager at Franklin Templeton Investments, said in a telephone interview from Calgary. “The Canadian outlook is mediocre at best.”Poloz said in April that the unusually severe winter appeared to have disrupted commerce, but that he couldn’t be sure until he saw more data. The information since then has been mostly positive. Factory sales jumped 2.1 per cent in March from February after stalling the previous month, while new orders increased by 1.5 per cent, Statistics Canada reported on May 16. Retail sales also recovered in March, climbing 1.1 per cent, the second-consecutive monthly increase.Continued strong job growth suggests that businesses see the weakness in the past two quarters as temporaryBank of Canada statement Twitter Kevin Carmichael What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation ← Previous Next → Facebook Share this storyBoC upbeat about outlook as it leaves rates unchanged, but will proceed with caution Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn BoC upbeat about outlook as it leaves rates unchanged, but will proceed with caution Kevin Carmichael: Potential backlash from U.S.-China trade war mutes Poloz’s spring exuberance May 29, 20196:21 PM EDT Filed under News Economy Sponsored By: Reddit Join the conversation → Featured Stories advertisement 0 Comments Email Morelast_img read more


Canadas stagnating productivity has hit small business

first_img Share this storyCanada’s ‘stagnating productivity’ has hit small business Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn Featured Stories Facebook Clarification: The OECD study, Policies for Stronger and More Inclusive Growth in Canada, was published in June, 2017, not this year as originally reported.A messy tangle of regulatory requirements continues to weigh on the private sector in Canada, part of a broader dislocation between provinces that falls particularly heavily on smaller firms, one business association says.“There are some market distortions that need to be dealt with,” said Ted Mallett, vice-president and chief economist at the Canadian Federation of Independent Business, which represents over 110,000 firms.The comments are in line with long-standing complaints made by various small businesses and their representatives, who say that the administrative burdens tied to moving goods within Canadian borders are becoming increasingly onerous.Policy failures come in addition to a complicated tax regime that is difficult for small businesses to navigate. Small companies tend to be more burdened by added administrative costs than larger ones, Mallett said.The CFIB was particularly critical of a move by Canada’s Finance department last year to limit some tax breaks for small businesses, and has suggested Canada instead focus on a broader market reform to reduce administrative costs across the board.“We wish the clock could be rolled back a year, and pre-empt the previous approach the government wanted to take,” Mallet said of Ottawa’s small business tax reform last year.After an uproar, the federal government lowered the small business tax rate to 10 per cent this year from 10.5 per cent, and pledge to cut it to 9 per cent in 2019.The concerns by business groups are supported by a report by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) released last year, which found “stagnating productivity and weak business dynamism are a concern” in Canada, due to a host of regulatory and financing shortfalls.So-called “entrepreneurial dynamism” refers to the ability for new small businesses to enter the market and force out older and weaker firms.The OECD found that Canada has the highest number of older firms among 15 other developed countries, with business dynamism gradually waning since the 1980s.“Barriers to foreign direct investment and the regulatory protection of incumbents are higher (in Canada) than in many other countries,” the report said, adding that governments should focus on “reducing market failures and better harmonizing provincial legislation.”The report also points out that falling entrepreneurial dynamism in Canada is part of a broader trend that has been witnessed in several developed nations. Obstacles in inter-provincial trade are particularly troublesome for small companies, the report said. Costs tied to complying with varying regulations in each province amount to the equivalent of a five-to-15 per cent tariff for smaller firms, compared to less than five per cent for larger firms.Air transport, courier services and telecommunications were deemed to be the most in need of reform, largely due to caps on foreign investment. The report also said a lack of interconnectedness between provinces in the electrical grid “is largely a result of geography and the uneven distribution of the population, but it also reflects regulatory fragmentation.”Business investment in innovation in Canada has continued to lag other countries. The OECD found that business spending on research and development is below the OECD average at 0.8 per cent of GDP, despite public spending on R&D above the OECD average (also 0.8 per cent of GDP). Business investment in the U.S. is roughly two per cent of GDP.Canadian small businesses are also slow to adopt new information and communications technologies, with only 13.4 per cent of companies using resource planning software in 2015. Adoption rates among small firms in Germany was much higher in Germany (50 per cent) and Belgium (44 per cent).• Email: jsnyder@nationalpost.com | Twitter: What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation Canada’s ‘stagnating productivity’ has hit small business Policy dysfunction weighs particularly heavily on small businesses Join the conversation → 0 Comments advertisement Reddit ← Previous Next →center_img More OECD warned Monday that regulatory requirements and the growing tax burden in Canada is hindering private sector productivity.Postmedia News July 16, 20183:24 PM EDTLast UpdatedJuly 17, 201811:58 AM EDT Filed under News Economy Comment Email Jesse Snyder Sponsored By: Recommended For YouToronto’s apartment crunch is easing — but average rent still $2,475U.S. corn, wheat stay weak on improving crop prospectsLatest Netflix price increase costs it plenty of customers just as it faces competitive futureANALYSIS-Can Europe, Brexit inspire China’s bid for mega market?B.C. town declares financial crisis after sawmill closes, latest in string of shutdowns and layoffs Twitterlast_img read more


Mazda to release first allelectric car in 2020

first_imgSource: Charge Forward Mazda has been notoriously slow to embrace electric cars, but it now appears we’ll be seeing the company’s first all-electric model next year. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1zk7Eb8r-s&list=PL_Qf0A10763mA7Byw9ncZqxjke6Gjz0MtThe post Mazda to release first all-electric car in 2020 appeared first on Electrek.last_img


Putting a value on home pride

first_imgThe advantage of playing at home can vary significantly from place to place, and punters should remember this over the next five days if betting on qualifiers for the 2010 World Cup. In Europe, countries derive no greater benefit from playing within their own borders than top clubs do from playing inside their own town. In England, Spain and Italy, home teams win around 45% of all games. In European qualifiers for the last three World Cups, home teams also won 45% of all games.The figure was more than 10% higher in South America. Since the beginning of qualifying for 1998, the nations have played each other home and away in a league, with the highest finishers progressing to the World Cup. In that time, hosts have won 57% of all games.The reason is not only because some countries gain a natural advantage from their high altitude. Over the last two qualifying campaigns, Brazil won 14 of their home games and drew the other four. Away from home, however, they won only two games out of nine in the 2002 and 2006 campaigns. So far in the 2010 preliminaries, Brazil have lost in Paraguay and drawn in Peru, while Argentina have lost in Colombia. Brazil visit Chile on Sunday, while Argentina travel to Peru on Wednesday.In Africa, the venue is every bit as important as it is in South America. In African qualifiers for the last World Cup, home teams won 57% of games. In Asia 51% and in the Central & North America region it was 50%. There may be no place like home, but no two homes are quite the same.Kevin Pullein is football tipster for the Racing Post Share on Facebook Share via Email Share on Pinterest World Cup First published on Thu 4 Sep 2008 19.01 EDT Trendspotting Share on Twitter Topics Share on LinkedIn Thu 4 Sep 2008 19.01 EDT World Cup 2010 Putting a value on home pridecenter_img Share on Facebook Sport betting Trendspotting Share on Messenger World Cup 2010 Share on Twitter Share on WhatsApp Share via Email Shares00 Kevin Pullein Reuse this contentlast_img read more


EbanksBlake makes good on McCarthys fighting talk

first_img@John_Ashdown Share on WhatsApp Championship John Ashdown Share on Twitter Crystal Palace Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn Share on Pinterest Wolves’ Sylvan Ebanks-Blake celebrates his winning penalty. Photograph: Sean Dempsey/PA Shares00 Share on Facebook Championship If Wolves are a frustrating side to watch for their fans, imagine how irritating they must be for their rivals. Just as the other promotion contenders rediscovered their winning ways, Wolves responded in kind, Sylvan Ebanks-Blake’s controversial 74th-minute penalty securing only the second win in the leaders’ past 12 games and going some way to re-establishing their grip at the top.At the final whistle the Wolves players celebrated in front of the 1421 travelling fans as if this victory had secured promotion. Though that remains on the horizon for now, Mick McCarthy was in no doubt as to the importance of this result.”I can’t deny there’s relief,” the Wolves manager said. “There’s nothing that gives you more belief, or heart, or confidence than actually winning that game. Talking about it is one thing, but the key thing is actually feeling it and having that response to the win.”Neil Warnock’s irritation was reserved for the officials who awarded the penalty after Clint Hill appeared to bundle over Michael Kightly. “The penalty is not a penalty,” said the Palace manager, whose team has won once in nine. “You can’t blame him for cheating. It was a tangle – there’s no way a linesman 45 yards away can say conclusively that’s a trip. The video doesn’t show anything at all like that. It’s a tangle and there’s no contact at all. It’s absolutely scandalous.”Wolves must have been filled with trepidation when they disembarked the team bus in south London to thunderous rain, blown sideways through Selhurst Park by gusting winds. After the defeat to Plymouth at the weekend, McCarthy had reasserted his belief that his side could return to the football that brought them 15 wins in the opening 19 matches of the Championship season.There was never any danger of the visitors returning to the heights of autumn, although they did show flashes in the first half. However, as the match wore on, the anxiety that McCarthy admitted had affected his side during the Plymouth defeat was evident once more.Certainly, the tell-tale signs of nerves – snatched clearances, clumsy tackles, defensive hesitation – were becoming apparent in the visitors, and that anxiety was eclipsed by sheer relief when Wayne Hennessey superbly tipped Paul Ifill’s skidding free-kick on to the inside of the post six minutes after the restart.Yet on this occasion, Wolves did finally show the “guts and character” that Chris Iwelumo had demanded of his team-mates. On 74 minutes, Kightly, as he had in the first half, sprung the Palace defence, tangled with Hill, and Ebanks-Blake did the necessary from the spot to send Wolves five points clear at the summit.center_img Wolverhampton Wanderers Topics Championship 2008-09 Share on Twitter Share via Email Ebanks-Blake makes good on McCarthy’s fighting talk Share via Email First published on Tue 3 Mar 2009 18.18 EST match reports Tue 3 Mar 2009 18.18 EST Share on Messenger Reuse this contentlast_img read more


Fellaini and Saha send Everton to Wembley for first time in 14

first_imgFA Cup Andy Hunter at Goodison Park Substitute Louis Saha heads home from close range to hand Everton a 2-1 lead in their FA Cup clash with Middlesbrough Photograph: Michael Regan/Action Images Sun 8 Mar 2009 16.56 EDT FA Cup 2008-09 Share on Facebook Share via Email Share on Twitter Everton Share on LinkedIn A date with Wayne Rooney at Wembley may not be every Evertonian’s idea of a good day out, but the fireworks that exploded over the Winslow public house on Goodison Road tonight suggested few are perturbed at the thought. Fourteen years since their last FA Cup semi-final, their last trophy and their last visit to Wembley, Everton have trophies on their agenda beyond Easter. It will take more than Manchester United to douse the spirit in David Moyes’ men.”It doesn’t mean anything to take Everton to Wembley in a semi-final,” said their manager, while outside the hordes sang that it certainly did. “I am delighted to take Everton to a semi-final but what matters is to take Everton to the final and to win a trophy. There is a long way to go.”Given Everton’s propensity to succeed the hard way, with Liverpool, Aston Villa and now Middlesbrough vanquished with depleted resources and following a dreadful first-half performance today , there was an inevitability about drawing United in the semi-final. Given the odds Everton continue to defy, they will not head to London in fear. “We’ll get United,” said the former Old Trafford man and Everton’s outstanding captain, Phil Neville. “From the moment we beat Liverpool our fans have been saying it is our year. We’ll enjoy the semis but we want to win it. It has been too long since this club won silverware. Now we’ve got to step up and be men.”If Middlesbrough could say the same they would be sorting out weekends in London today, and Gareth Southgate would have no concerns over his long-term prospects on Teesside. Their inconsistency must madden him and here, in the space of 90 minutes, their two contrasting faces were on full view.For 45 minutes Middlesbrough were vibrant and adventurous and Everton were flailing in their response. Ahead when David Wheater powered a header from Matthew Bates’ delivery beyond an off-key Tim Howard, the visitors headed down the tunnel in complete control. A different team and a different mentality re-emerged for the second half.”The way we gave the lead away shows why we are where we are this season,” admitted Southgate. “We have to learn to win matches and see games through. We knew exactly how Everton were going to play and dealt brilliantly with the balls into our box but for a six-minute period. Did we do enough as a team to win it? Probably not.”In that first half it appeared Everton’s crippling injury list had finally caused their engine to seize up. Their only threat before the interval arrived from set pieces or in the hope that the referee, Mark Halsey, would punish Robert Huth for grappling Marouane Fellaini whenever he set foot inside the area. That was some hope. Not even a hand around the Belgian’s neck counted as an offence against the increasingly irate Fellaini.The second half, however, was an entirely different contest. Moyes bolstered his attack with Louis Saha in place of Jack Rodwell, but it was the change in attitude that transformed Everton as much as the alteration in personnel.Five minutes after the restart Tim Cahill dropped back into central midfield, flighted an outstanding cross into the area and Fellaini exacted his revenge on Huth by winning their aerial tussle and sending a looping header over Brad Jones. It would barely have troubled the goalkeeper had he stayed on his line but, stranded in no man’s land, Jones’ positioning proved a costly error.”Once we conceded one goal we were dealing with the momentum of the Everton crowd and their belief that it is going to be Everton’s year,” said Southgate, who refused to single out his goalkeeper for blame, citing missed tackles in the build-up to the equaliser as equally important.Eleven minutes after the restart the tie was transformed, and Moyes’ decision to introduce Saha looked inspired. Leon Osman atoned for the foul that produced Wheater’s opener by winning possession and surging into the area. Though his cross escaped the France international, Steven Pienaar retrieved the ball on the opposite flank and delivered an exquisite cross that Saha headed home at the near postas Goodison Park exploded into life.Saha should have had a second in the 87th minute, only to miscue horribly with only Jones to beat, and Boro responded only belatedly when Howard fumbled O’Neil’s free-kick and Lescott produced a vital clearance. “That was not the real Everton in the first half and Steve Round got into them brilliantly at half-time,” said Moyes. “The principles we have instilled in them were not there, but they were in the end.” Shares00 match reports Middlesbrough Share on Pinterest Share on WhatsApp First published on Sun 8 Mar 2009 16.56 EDT Share on Facebook FA Cup Share via Email Share on Messenger Fellaini and Saha send Everton to Wembley for first time in 14 years Share on Twitter Topics Reuse this contentlast_img read more


What Do These Companies And Firms Have In Common

first_img Strategies For Minimizing Risk Under The FCPA A compliance guide with issue-spotting scenarios, skills exercises and model answers. “This book is a prime example of why corporate compliance professionals and practitioners alike continue to listen to Professor Koehler.” Wal-Mart, Amazon, GE Healthcare, Oracle, Lowes, SAP, Las Vegas Sands, Olympus, Post Holdings, McDermott International, Caesars Entertainment, Micron Technology, ADM, Cummins, Discover Financial Services, KBR, Halliburton, Johnson & Johnson, Crawford Co., Realogy Holdings, CVS Caremark, Ensco, HCA Healthcare, Carnival Cruise Line, Olin Corp., CB&I, Abbott, Marathon Petroleum, Expeditors, Netflix, Wells Fargo, Schnitzer Steel 3M, Briggs & Stratton, Sherwin Williams, Standard Motor Products, Graebel, Allison Transmission, Bunge, Chemours, Twitter, and many more.Debevoise & Plimpton, King & Spalding, Hogan Lovells, Greenberg Traurig, Bryan Cave, Squire Patton Boggs, Foley & Larder, Hughes Hubbard & Reed, Bass Berry & Sims, Perkins Coie, Pepper Hamilton, Seyfath Shaw, Quarles & Brady, Troutman Sanders, Stinson Leonard, Littler Mendelson, Barnes & Thornburg, Constantine Cannon, Archer Greiner, KPMG, Deloitte, and many more.All of these companies or firms have sent personnel to the FCPA Institute to elevate their FCPA knowledge and practical skills.The next FCPA Institute is in Minneapolis on June 20-21, 2019. Click here to learn more and register. Order Your Copylast_img read more


VE Latham and Andrews Kurth Advise in MA Worth 18 Billion

first_imgLawyers from the three firms helped ETP and Sunoco negotiate an $816 dropdown transaction and LINN Energy secure a $1 billion equity capital commitment from Quantum Energy Partners . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content. Lost your password? Username Remember mecenter_img Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook. Passwordlast_img


JC Penney Plans Store Closures No Word If Wenatchee Store Is IncludedRocky

first_imgJC Penney plans store closures and employee buyouts this year. The department store giant will close about 13-percent of their retail stores nation wide.The company recently reported its first quarterly profit since 2010.  CEO Marvin Ellison says they’re up against what he calls “the growing threat of online retailers”Thousands of employees could face layoffs and another 6-thousand will be offered early retirement packages.The list of stores slated for closure will be released in about 2 weeks. There’s no word yet on whether any Washington State stores will be impacted by the closures.last_img


Study shows how alcohol intoxication enhances likelihood of sexual aggression

first_imgJul 5 2018A new Aggressive Behavior study has examined alcohol’s “in the moment” effects on sexual aggression, or the acute effects of alcohol on men’s decisions about how to respond to sexual refusals in a dating simulation.In the study, 62 men in their 20s were randomly assigned to consume alcohol (target breath alcohol level 0.080%) or no alcohol. Participants were encouraged to talk to a simulated woman as if they were on a date, and they made choices from a list which included nonsexual and sexual options. The female agent was programmed to engage in some sexual activities but refuse others, and her refusals became more intense if participants persisted.Related StoriesRecreational cannabis legalization could impact alcohol industry, research showsSobering up: In an alcohol-soaked nation, more seek booze-free social spacesNew research examines whether effects of alcohol/pregnancy policies vary by raceAs predicted, participants’ self-reported desire to have sex was positively associated with choosing activities in which the woman willingly engaged. Consensual sexual activities were positively associated with the number of times participants persisted after the woman refused. Alcohol moderated this relationship such that it was stronger for intoxicated men than sober men. The more sexual refusals participants received, the more hostile verbal comments they made to the woman. Contrary to the investigators’ predictions, this relationship was not moderated by alcohol.”We found that when a man is sexually interested in a woman, being intoxicated increases the likelihood that he will be more persistent pushing sex, even when she clearly refuses his advances. Furthermore, being sexually refused is associated with making hostile comments to the woman, regardless of whether or not the men were drinking,” said lead author Dr. Jacqueline Woerner, currently at Yale University School of Medicine. Source:http://newsroom.wiley.com/press-release/aggressive-behavior/study-examines-alcohols-effects-sexual-aggressionlast_img read more


New guideline recommends firsttrimester screening of pregnant women for asymptomatic bacteriuria

first_img Source:http://www.cmaj.ca/ Jul 9 2018First-trimester screening of pregnant women for asymptomatic bacteriuria — higher than normal bacteria levels without symptoms of a bladder infection — is recommended by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care in an updated guideline in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).”As the data underlying this long-standing screening practice have not been revisited in decades, the task force saw the need for an updated guideline looking at the evidence on potential harms and benefits of screening while considering women’s values and preferences around screening and treatment,” says Dr. Ainsley Moore, a family physician and associate professor of family medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario.Current practice in Canada is to screen via urine culture in the first trimester, regardless of whether there are symptoms of a urinary tract infection, and to treat elevated bacteria levels with antibiotics.Related StoriesRaw meat can act as reservoir for bacteria associated with hospital infectionsNew research could help design algae that produces fuels and cleanup chemicalsStudy shows link between gut microbiome health and successful joint replacementThe recommendation to continue screening is based only on low-quality evidence that showed a small reduction in kidney infections in pregnant women and in the number of babies with a low birth weight. The task force calls upon researchers to apply new methods to evaluate such entrenched standards of care to inform the care of pregnant women in Canada.For women with recurrent urinary tract infections, diabetes, kidney issues or sickle cell disease, doctors should follow high-risk screening recommendations from authorities such as the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC), which, for example, advises screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria once during each trimester of pregnancy in women with recurrent urinary tract infections.Kidney infection has been associated with bacterial blood infection (septicemia) and kidney disfunction in mothers, and with low birth weight and preterm birth in infants.This guideline updates a 1994 guideline from the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination that recommended routine prenatal screening.In creating the guideline, the task force engaged women across Canada (aged 21-41 years) for their views on the potential benefits and harms of screening. The participants viewed screening as beneficial, although some were concerned about antibiotic use if they screened positive.”We saw considerable variation in women’s values and preferences when presented with evidence of the benefits and harms,” says Dr. Brett Thombs, Chair of the task force. “Women who are interested in small potential reductions in the risk of kidney infection and low birth weight may choose to screen, while others who are more concerned about the potential risks of antibiotics may decide not to screen. It ultimately comes down to patient preferences and a discussion between the clinician and patient to determine these.”This clinical practice guideline has been endorsed by the Canadian Association of Midwives/Association canadienne des sages-femmes (CAM/ACSF) and the Nurse Practitioner Association of Canada (NPAC).last_img read more


Astronomers say a Neptunesized planet lurks beyond Pluto

first_img (DATA) JPL; BATYGIN AND BROWN/CALTECH; (DIAGRAM) A. CUADRA/SCIENCE The 8-meter Subaru Telescope atop Mauna Kea in Hawaii has a large field of view—enabling it to search efficiently for Planet X. Batygin and Brown inferred its presence from the peculiar clustering of six previously known objects that orbit beyond Neptune. They say there’s only a 0.007% chance, or about one in 15,000, that the clustering could be a coincidence. Instead, they say, a planet with the mass of 10 Earths has shepherded the six objects into their strange elliptical orbits, tilted out of the plane of the solar system.The orbit of the inferred planet is similarly tilted, as well as stretched to distances that will explode previous conceptions of the solar system. Its closest approach to the sun is seven times farther than Neptune, or 200 astronomical units (AUs). (An AU is the distance between Earth and the sun, about 150 million kilometers.) And Planet X could roam as far as 600 to 1200 AU, well beyond the Kuiper belt, the region of small icy worlds that begins at Neptune’s edge about 30 AU.If Planet X is out there, Brown and Batygin say, astronomers ought to find more objects in telltale orbits, shaped by the pull of the hidden giant. But Brown knows that no one will really believe in the discovery until Planet X itself appears within a telescope viewfinder. “Until there’s a direct detection, it’s a hypothesis—even a potentially very good hypothesis,” he says. The team has time on the one large telescope in Hawaii that is suited for the search, and they hope other astronomers will join in the hunt.Killing Pluto was fun, but this is head and shoulders above everything else.Mike Brown, CaltechBatygin and Brown published the result today in The Astronomical Journal. Alessandro Morbidelli, a planetary dynamicist at the Nice Observatory in France, performed the peer review for the paper. In a statement, he says Batygin and Brown made a “very solid argument” and that he is “quite convinced by the existence of a distant planet.”Championing a new ninth planet is an ironic role for Brown; he is better known as a planet slayer. His 2005 discovery of Eris, a remote icy world nearly the same size as Pluto, revealed that what was seen as the outermost planet was just one of many worlds in the Kuiper belt. Astronomers promptly reclassified Pluto as a dwarf planet—a saga Brown recounted in his book How I Killed Pluto.Now, he has joined the centuries-old search for new planets. His method—inferring the existence of Planet X from its ghostly gravitational effects—has a respectable track record. In 1846, for example, the French mathematician Urbain Le Verrier predicted the existence of a giant planet from irregularities in the orbit of Uranus. Astronomers at the Berlin Observatory found the new planet, Neptune, where it was supposed to be, sparking a media sensation.Remaining hiccups in Uranus’s orbit led scientists to think that there might yet be one more planet, and in 1906 Percival Lowell, a wealthy tycoon, began the search for what he called “Planet X” at his new observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona. In 1930, Pluto turned up—but it was far too small to tug meaningfully on Uranus. More than half a century later, new calculations based on measurements by the Voyager spacecraft revealed that the orbits of Uranus and Neptune were just fine on their own: No Planet X was needed.Yet the allure of Planet X persisted. In the 1980s, for example, researchers proposed that an unseen brown dwarf star could cause periodic extinctions on Earth by triggering fusillades of comets. In the 1990s, scientists invoked a Jupiter-sized planet at the solar system’s edge to explain the origin of certain oddball comets. Just last month, researchers claimed to have detected the faint microwave glow of an outsized rocky planet some 300 AU away, using an array of telescope dishes in Chile called the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). (Brown was one of many skeptics, noting that ALMA’s narrow field of view made the chances of finding such an object vanishingly slim.)Brown got his first inkling of his current quarry in 2003, when he led a team that found Sedna, an object a bit smaller than both Eris and Pluto. Sedna’s odd, far-flung orbit made it the most distant known object in the solar system at the time. Its perihelion, or closest point to the sun, lay at 76 AU, beyond the Kuiper belt and far outside the influence of Neptune’s gravity. The implication was clear: Something massive, well beyond Neptune, must have pulled Sedna into its distant orbit. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Outside scientists say their calculations stack up and express a mixture of caution and excitement about the result. “I could not imagine a bigger deal if—and of course that’s a boldface ‘if’—if it turns out to be right,” says Gregory Laughlin, a planetary scientist at the University of California (UC), Santa Cruz. “What’s thrilling about it is [the planet] is detectable.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe If the search pans out, what should the new member of the sun’s family be called? Brown says it’s too early to worry about that and scrupulously avoids offering up suggestions. For now, he and Batygin are calling it Planet Nine (and, for the past year, informally, Planet Phattie—1990s slang for “cool”). Brown notes that neither Uranus nor Neptune—the two planets discovered in modern times—ended up being named by their discoverers, and he thinks that that’s probably a good thing. It’s bigger than any one person, he says: “It’s kind of like finding a new continent on Earth.”He is sure, however, that Planet X—unlike Pluto—deserves to be called a planet. Something the size of Neptune in the solar system? Don’t even ask. “No one would argue this one, not even me.” LANCE HAYASHIDA/CALTECH That something didn’t have to be a planet. Sedna’s gravitational nudge could have come from a passing star, or from one of the many other stellar nurseries that surrounded the nascent sun at the time of the solar system’s formation.Since then, a handful of other icy objects have turned up in similar orbits. By combining Sedna with five other weirdos, Brown says he has ruled out stars as the unseen influence: Only a planet could explain such strange orbits. Of his three major discoveries—Eris, Sedna, and now, potentially, Planet X—Brown says the last is the most sensational. “Killing Pluto was fun. Finding Sedna was scientifically interesting,” he says. “But this one, this is head and shoulders above everything else.”Brown and Batygin were nearly beaten to the punch. For years, Sedna was a lone clue to a perturbation from beyond Neptune. Then, in 2014, Scott Sheppard and Chad Trujillo (a former graduate student of Brown’s) published a paper describing the discovery of VP113, another object that never comes close to the sun. Sheppard, of the Carnegie Institution for Science in Washington, D.C., and Trujillo, of the Gemini Observatory in Hawaii, were well aware of the implications. They began to examine the orbits of the two objects along with 10 other oddballs. They noticed that, at perihelion, all came very near the plane of solar system in which Earth orbits, called the ecliptic. In a paper, Sheppard and Trujillo pointed out the peculiar clumping and raised the possibility that a distant large planet had herded the objects near the ecliptic. But they didn’t press the result any further.Later that year, at Caltech, Batygin and Brown began discussing the results. Plotting the orbits of the distant objects, Batygin says, they realized that the pattern that Sheppard and Trujillo had noticed “was only half of the story.” Not only were the objects near the ecliptic at perihelia, but their perihelia were physically clustered in space (see diagram, above).For the next year, the duo secretly discussed the pattern and what it meant. It was an easy relationship, and their skills complemented each other. Batygin, a 29-year-old whiz kid computer modeler, went to college at UC Santa Cruz for the beach and the chance to play in a rock band. But he made his mark there by modeling the fate of the solar system over billions of years, showing that, in rare cases, it was unstable: Mercury may plunge into the sun or collide with Venus. “It was an amazing accomplishment for an undergraduate,” says Laughlin, who worked with him at the time.Brown, 50, is the observational astronomer, with a flair for dramatic discoveries and the confidence to match. He wears shorts and sandals to work, puts his feet up on his desk, and has a breeziness that masks intensity and ambition. He has a program all set to sift for Planet X in data from a major telescope the moment they become publicly available later this year.Their offices are a few doors down from each other. “My couch is nicer, so we tend to talk more in my office,” Batygin says. “We tend to look more at data in Mike’s.” They even became exercise buddies, and discussed their ideas while waiting to get in the water at a Los Angeles, California, triathlon in the spring of 2015.First, they winnowed the dozen objects studied by Sheppard and Trujillo to the six most distant—discovered by six different surveys on six different telescopes. That made it less likely that the clumping might be due to an observation bias such as pointing a telescope at a particular part of the sky.Batygin began seeding his solar system models with Planet X’s of various sizes and orbits, to see which version best explained the objects’ paths. Some of the computer runs took months. A favored size for Planet X emerged—between five and 15 Earth masses—as well as a preferred orbit: antialigned in space from the six small objects, so that its perihelion is in the same direction as the six objects’ aphelion, or farthest point from the sun. The orbits of the six cross that of Planet X, but not when the big bully is nearby and could disrupt them. The final epiphany came 2 months ago, when Batygin’s simulations showed that Planet X should also sculpt the orbits of objects that swoop into the solar system from above and below, nearly orthogonal to the ecliptic. “It sparked this memory,” Brown says. “I had seen these objects before.” It turns out that, since 2002, five of these highly inclined Kuiper belt objects have been discovered, and their origins are largely unexplained. “Not only are they there, but they are in exactly the places we predicted,” Brown says. “That is when I realized that this is not just an interesting and good idea—this is actually real.”Sheppard, who with Trujillo had also suspected an unseen planet, says Batygin and Brown “took our result to the next level. …They got deep into the dynamics, something that Chad and I aren’t really good with. That’s why I think this is exciting.”Others, like planetary scientist Dave Jewitt, who discovered the Kuiper belt, are more cautious. The 0.007% chance that the clustering of the six objects is coincidental gives the planet claim a statistical significance of 3.8 sigma—beyond the 3-sigma threshold typically required to be taken seriously, but short of the 5 sigma that is sometimes used in fields like particle physics. That worries Jewitt, who has seen plenty of 3-sigma results disappear before. By reducing the dozen objects examined by Sheppard and Trujillo to six for their analysis, Batygin and Brown weakened their claim, he says. “I worry that the finding of a single new object that is not in the group would destroy the whole edifice,” says Jewitt, who is at UC Los Angeles. “It’s a game of sticks with only six sticks.”center_img The solar system appears to have a new ninth planet. Today, two scientists announced evidence that a body nearly the size of Neptune—but as yet unseen—orbits the sun every 15,000 years. During the solar system’s infancy 4.5 billion years ago, they say, the giant planet was knocked out of the planet-forming region near the sun. Slowed down by gas, the planet settled into a distant elliptical orbit, where it still lurks today.The claim is the strongest yet in the centuries-long search for a “Planet X” beyond Neptune. The quest has been plagued by far-fetched claims and even outright quackery. But the new evidence comes from a pair of respected planetary scientists, Konstantin Batygin and Mike Brown of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, who prepared for the inevitable skepticism with detailed analyses of the orbits of other distant objects and months of computer simulations. “If you say, ‘We have evidence for Planet X,’ almost any astronomer will say, ‘This again? These guys are clearly crazy.’ I would, too,” Brown says. “Why is this different? This is different because this time we’re right.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) At first blush, another potential problem comes from NASA’s Widefield Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), a satellite that completed an all-sky survey looking for the heat of brown dwarfs—or giant planets. It ruled out the existence of a Saturn-or-larger planet as far out as 10,000 AU, according to a 2013 study by Kevin Luhman, an astronomer at Pennsylvania State University, University Park. But Luhman notes that if Planet X is Neptune-sized or smaller, as Batygin and Brown say, WISE would have missed it. He says there is a slim chance of detection in another WISE data set at longer wavelengths—sensitive to cooler radiation—which was collected for 20% of the sky. Luhman is now analyzing those data.Even if Batygin and Brown can convince other astronomers that Planet X exists, they face another challenge: explaining how it ended up so far from the sun. At such distances, the protoplanetary disk of dust and gas was likely to have been too thin to fuel planet growth. And even if Planet X did get a foothold as a planetesimal, it would have moved too slowly in its vast, lazy orbit to hoover up enough material to become a giant.Instead, Batygin and Brown propose that Planet X formed much closer to the sun, alongside Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Computer models have shown that the early solar system was a tumultuous billiards table, with dozens or even hundreds of planetary building blocks the size of Earth bouncing around. Another embryonic giant planet could easily have formed there, only to be booted outward by a gravitational kick from another gas giant.It’s harder to explain why Planet X didn’t either loop back around to where it started or leave the solar system entirely. But Batygin says that residual gas in the protoplanetary disk might have exerted enough drag to slow the planet just enough for it to settle into a distant orbit and remain in the solar system. That could have happened if the ejection took place when the solar system was between 3 million and 10 million years old, he says, before all the gas in the disk was lost into space.Hal Levison, a planetary dynamicist at the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado, agrees that something has to be creating the orbital alignment Batygin and Brown have detected. But he says the origin story they have developed for Planet X and their special pleading for a gas-slowed ejection add up to “a low-probability event.” Other researchers are more positive. The proposed scenario is plausible, Laughlin says. “Usually things like this are wrong, but I’m really excited about this one,” he says. “It’s better than a coin flip.”All this means that Planet X will remain in limbo until it is actually found.Astronomers have some good ideas about where to look, but spotting the new planet won’t be easy. Because objects in highly elliptical orbits move fastest when they are close to the sun, Planet X spends very little time at 200 AU. And if it were there right now, Brown says, it would be so bright that astronomers probably would have already spotted it.Instead, Planet X is likely to spend most of its time near aphelion, slowly trotting along at distances between 600 and 1200 AU. Most telescopes capable of seeing a dim object at such distances, such as the Hubble Space Telescope or the 10-meter Keck telescopes in Hawaii, have extremely tiny fields of view. It would be like looking for a needle in a haystack by peering through a drinking straw.One telescope can help: Subaru, an 8-meter telescope in Hawaii that is owned by Japan. It has enough light-gathering area to detect such a faint object, coupled with a huge field of view—75 times larger than that of a Keck telescope. That allows astronomers to scan large swaths of the sky each night. Batygin and Brown are using Subaru to look for Planet X—and they are coordinating their efforts with their erstwhile competitors, Sheppard and Trujillo, who have also joined the hunt with Subaru. Brown says it will take about 5 years for the two teams to search most of the area where Planet X could be lurking. Subaru Telescope, NAOJ IMAGES: WIKIMEDIA COMMONS; NASA/JPL-CALTECH; A. CUADRA/SCIENCE; NASA/JHUAPL/SWRI; (DIAGRAM) A. CUADRA/SCIENCE Mike Brown (left) and Konstantin Batygin. Emaillast_img read more


Top stories Chocolate money the rise of multicellularity and pet rabbit brains

first_img By Katie LanginJun. 29, 2018 , 4:45 PM Top stories: Chocolate money, the rise of multicellularity, and pet rabbit brains Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Billions of years ago, life crossed a threshold. Single cells started to band together, and a world of formless, unicellular life was on course to evolve into the riot of shapes and functions of multicellular life today, from ants to pear trees to people. It’s a transition as momentous as any in the history of life, and until recently we had no idea how it happened.Why your pet rabbit is more docile than its wild relativeWhy does a wild rabbit flee when a person approaches, but a domestic rabbit sticks around for a treat? A new study finds that domestication may have triggered changes in the brains of these—and perhaps other—animals that have helped them adapt to their new, human-dominated environment.U.S. judge tosses climate lawsuits by California cities, but says science is soundA federal judge this week threw out lawsuits from two California cities seeking to make oil companies pay for worsening sea-level rise and other climate change impacts. San Francisco and Oakland, California, sued Chevron Corp., BP PLC, ConocoPhillips, Exxon Mobil Corp., and Royal Dutch Shell PLC, arguing the companies make and sell products that, when combusted, create a public nuisance. The cities also contended that the companies knew the global dangers for decades and hid that information while protecting their assets.Hundreds of new genes may underlie intelligence—but also autism and depressionBeing smart is a double-edged sword. Intelligent people appear to live longer, but many of the genes behind brilliance can also lead to autism, anxiety, and depression, according to two new massive genetic studies. The work is also one of the first to identify the specific cell types and genetic pathways tied to intelligence and mental health, potentially paving the way for new ways to improve education, or therapies to treat neurotic behavior. (left to right): ARINA HABICH/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO; WANG CHI LAU/ EMBRYOLOGY COURSE AT THE MARINE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY; istock.com/martinedoucet The Maya civilization used chocolate as moneyYour Hershey bar may have been worth its weight in gold in Mayan times. A new study reveals that chocolate became its own form of money at the height of Mayan opulence—and that the loss of this delicacy may have played a role in the downfall of the famed civilization.The momentous transition to multicellular life may not have been so hard after alllast_img read more


Airport construction threatens unexplored archaeological sites in Peru

first_img Cuzco Felix Lipov/Alamy Stock Photo Ollantaytambo Madrid Machu Picchu PERU N. Desai/Science Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Lizzie WadeFeb. 5, 2019 , 2:50 PM Email ITALY Atlantic Ocean 125 Lima Bilbao 0 FRANCE Chinchero (airport)center_img Last month, a phalanx of bulldozers and trucks arrived in Chinchero, Peru, to begin to clear land for a 40-year-old dream: an international airport in the heart of the country’s tourist region high in the Andes. Once it is completed in 2023, authorities say 6 million visitors a year will have an easier, more direct route to nearby Incan sites, including the famed royal estate of Machu Picchu. But archaeologists, anthropologists, historians, and others say the airport and the resulting surge in development and tourism will destroy archaeological sites and some of the very cultural riches the visitors come to see. Nearly 200 Peruvian and international experts have signed a letter to Peruvian President Martín Vizcarra asking him to suspend construction and consider relocating the project. More than 2000 people have signed an accompanying petition.Chinchero overlooks Peru’s Sacred Valley, one of the first areas conquered by the Incas in the 1300s as they began to expand their empire from their capital of Cuzco, 29 kilometers southeast of Chinchero. The Sacred Valley provided maize and other crops to Incan rulers, and several emperors built their private estates there. Incan agricultural terraces still cover the hillsides around Chinchero and are used by local farmers. “It’s one of Peru’s most archaeological and historically complex places,” says Natalia Majluf, a Peruvian art historian at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, former director of the Lima Museum of Art, and one of the petition’s organizers. “You put an airport in the middle of that landscape and it’s a disaster.”Topa Inca, who ruled from 1471 to 1493, built a royal estate at Chinchero, similar to Machu Picchu (built by his father, Pachacuti), and others nearby including Ollantaytambo and Písac. Unlike those, Chinchero has remained largely untouched. Its preservation is “phenomenal,” says Stella Nair, an architectural historian at the University of California, Los Angeles, who spent a year in Chinchero measuring and mapping the Incan imperial buildings and landscaping that still dot the town and the farmland around it. “The key for studying the architecture is finding sites that haven’t been altered for tourist consumption. And that is incredibly hard,” she says. IR. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Airport construction threatens unexplored archaeological sites in Peru A controversy takes off A new airport in Chinchero, Peru, would ferry tourists to Machu Picchu and the Sacred Valley. Researchers fear it will spur a building boom. Sacred Valley Alan Covey, an archaeologist at the University of Texas in Austin, led a survey of the region in 2004 and 2005. He found that, unlike the heart of the estate, which is in a protected archaeological zone, the airport site had little evidence of pre-Columbian occupation, as measured by visible ceramics and architecture. But archaeologists have conducted no excavations there. “We don’t know what’s underneath,” says Abel Traslaviña Arias, a Peruvian archaeologist and doctoral student at Vanderbilt University in Nashville. And once airport construction begins, “you’ll never get [those sites] back,” worries Thomas Cummins, an art historian at Harvard University who has worked in Chinchero.Since the 1970s, the regional government has dreamed of replacing the current Cuzco airport, which can handle only short-hop flights, with an international hub that could receive jets from Miami, Florida, and other distant cities. That would greatly ease a foreign tourist’s trip to Machu Picchu, which now involves at least two flights and can take several days. Vizcarra, who visited the construction site this week, has called the airport “a necessity for Cuzco and for Peru.” Officials have promised it will bring increased economic opportunities, and at least some area residents are eager for the potential boom. One of Chinchero’s three Indigenous communities sold its land to the government for the project. Andes Mountains The ruins of an Incan royal estate in Chinchero, Peru. SPAIN But Traslaviña Arias, Covey, and others fear the airport will fuel unregulated development. Businesses will race to build luxury hotels and restaurants, they say, drawing workers who will also need housing. New apartment complexes have already sprouted up along a main highway to house one community displaced by the project. Because most of the new infrastructure will be aimed at wealthy foreigners, Traslaviña Arias calls it “the gentrification of cultural patrimony.” (Peru’s Ministry of Culture did not respond to a request for comment.)Some researchers also wonder whether the development will end up making the region less appealing to visitors, not more. “The kind of degradation that [the airport] will bring … is going to be such that the tourists are going to be going somewhere else,” says Gabriela Ramos, a Peruvian historian at Cambridge and an organizer of the petition. They also note that Machu Picchu can’t accommodate more tourists, as it already receives well over the limit of 2500 daily visitors agreed to by Peru and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, which includes Machu Picchu on its list of World Heritage Sites.So far, the experts opposed to the airport have not received a response to their letter. And the Peruvian government is promising to complete the airport’s initial land clearing phase by September. If the project moves ahead, it would be “a tragedy,” says Mónica Ricketts, a Peruvian historian at Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (and an organizer of the petition). “We run the risk of destroying what the Spanish could not destroy.” Písac Km Atlantic Ocean PORT. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more


Valerie Castile Pays Off Lunch Debt For Students

first_img 62 Black Men And Boys Killed By Police The mother of Philando Castile—a 32-year-old Black man who tragically lost his life at the hands of a police officer in Falcon Heights, Minnesota three years ago—is honoring her son’s legacy by turning her pain into something positive. According to CBS Minnesota, Valerie Castile has paid off the lunch debt for students at Robbinsdale Cooper High School. Castile donated $8,000 to the school through the Philando Castile Relief Foundation. The funds will go towards clearing the lunch debt bill for high school seniors who are graduating. Within the district, students who have outstanding lunch debts are barred from receiving their diplomas. Castile said she wanted to make the donation because Philando—who worked at a school cafeteria—was adamant about helping students pay off their lunch debt.“This is something that Philando held near and dear to his heart,” she told the news outlet in a statement. “He’d pay for children’s lunch meals out of his own pocket instead of letting a child go hungry that day he would pay for it himself.” Last year a charity created in Philando’s honor raised $130,000 to pay off the lunch debt for students who attended school in St. Paul.Outstanding lunch debt has become a growing issue within the school district. According to Carlton Jenkins who serves as the superintendent of Robbinsdale Area Schools, the amount of debt has skyrocketed to $300,000. Many of the students who have debt are living in poverty, making it extremely hard for them to pay for lunch. Donations like the one made by the Philando Castile Relief Foundation are needed. The Minnesota school district isn’t the only one facing lunch debt issues. USA Today reported that 75 percent of school districts across the country had unpaid student meal debt during the 2016-2017 academic year.SEE ALSO:Philando Castile Honored With Two-Day Proclamation In Falcon HeightsMinnesota Deputy Under Fire For Racist Tweet About Philando Castile’s Girlfriend Lunch Debt , Philando Castile , Philando Castile Relief Foundation , Robbinsdale Cooper High School , Valerie Castilecenter_img Black boys and men killed by police composite photo Philando Castile’s Mom Presents $8,000 Donation To Help Clear Student Lunch Debts https://t.co/3BcZ2BMIPs pic.twitter.com/enh7OEzJog— WCCO – CBS Minnesota (@WCCO) April 26, 2019last_img read more


Ancient molecules reveal surprising details on origins of bizarre sloths

first_img By Gretchen VogelJun. 6, 2019 , 11:00 AM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country In one of the new studies, paleoprotein expert Samantha Presslee of the University of York in the United Kingdom and her colleagues sampled more than 100 sloth fossils from across North and South America for traces of collagen. This protein is prevalent in bones, and can stick around for more than 1 million years. In 17 samples the researchers analyzed, the collagen was preserved well enough that they were able to piece together the amino acid sequences that form the building blocks of proteins. That allowed them to compare the various collagens—one of which was more than 130,000 years old—and build likely family trees, which they describe today in Nature Ecology & Evolution. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Jorge Blanco iStock.com/sdominick Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email A sloth at rest From elephant-size animals that browsed North American grasslands to moose-size swimmers that plied the Pacific coast of South America, sloths have roamed Earth for more than 50 million years. Yet scientists know little about how the dozens of known species are related to each other. Now, two new analyses of ancient sloth DNA and proteins—some of which are more than 100,000 years old—are rewriting the sloth family tree. The studies even suggest a land bridge connected the West Indies with South America 30 million years ago, allowing the slow-moving animals to reach the islands.“It’s a remarkable achievement,” says Timothy Gaudin, a paleontologist at the University of Tennessee in Chattanooga, who was not involved in the work.Of the more than 100 sloth species identified, all but six are extinct. So scientists have had to compare the shapes of fossil bones to piece together how the animals evolved. Such comparisons are not clear-cut, however, and new techniques for isolating DNA and proteins from fossils have made it possible to compare the genetics of long-extinct animals. Ancient DNA allows scientists to compare genes directly, but proteins last longer. So although they provide less precise information, paleontologists are increasingly using them to study even older fossils. Genetic analysis suggests today’s three-toed sloths (top) are related to the giant ground sloths Megatherium (right) and Megalonyx (center), whereas modern two-toed sloths (upper right) are cousins of the South American Mylodon (left). Ancient molecules reveal surprising details on origins of ‘bizarre’ sloths Working independently, evolutionary biologist Frédéric Delsuc of the University of Montpellier in France and colleagues analyzed nearly full mitochondrial DNA sequences—the genetic material found in a cell’s energy-producing machinery—from 10 sloth fossils, ranging in age from 10,000 to 45,000 years old. They, too, used the data to draw likely sloth family trees, which the group describes today in Current Biology.The two teams came to strikingly similar conclusions: Today’s three-toed sloths don’t form their own branch on the tree as previously thought, but are related to the giant ground sloth, Megalonyx, which lived in North America until about 15,000 years ago. And today’s two-toed sloths are distant cousins of the giant South American Mylodon, believed to be the last ground sloth to go extinct, less than 10,000 years ago.Perhaps most surprising, the wide variety of now-extinct sloths that lived on the islands of the West Indies until about 5000 years ago all seem to have evolved from a common ancestor that lived about 30 million years ago. “Nobody had ever suggested that,” Gaudin says. That means a single population of sloths likely reached the islands just once. That fits with a theory that, instead of swimming or drifting, many animals reached the islands by walking over a land bridge that appeared about 30 million years ago and later was submerged.“The fact that the [two studies] agree with one another is really interesting,” Gaudin says. But, he cautions, the analysis only includes a fraction of the known species. “There are loads of different extinct sloths that we could add to the tree,” Presslee says. “That’s the next step.”Combining data from fossil shapes with the genetic data could produce even better trees, says Gerardo De Iuliis, a paleontologist at the University of Toronto in Canada. That might reveal how certain sloth traits—like the long, powerful forearms that allow today’s sloths to move while hanging from branches—arose independently multiple times. “They are bizarre animals that are bizarre in similar ways,” Gaudin says.last_img read more


Nitin Gadkari in Rajya Sabha Govt may make silicon nitrogen mandatory for

first_img Explained: What the government intends to do to improve road safety? Advertising Written by Abantika Ghosh | New Delhi | Published: July 9, 2019 1:59:08 am Parliament Monsoon Session, Nitin Gadkari, nitrogen in car tyres, Road Transport, Yamuna Expressway accident, road accidents, road safety, silicon car tyres, Indian express Union minister Nitin Gadkari. (File)The government is looking at making use of nitrogen in car tyres mandatory. Road Transport and Highways Minister Nitin Gadkari said this in Rajya Sabha on Monday while replying to a question on traffic accidents on the Yamuna Expressway. If you want good service, you have to pay: Nitin Gadkari on toll collection Advertising 2 Comment(s) Govt can’t do away with tolls, pay for good services: Nitin Gadkari “…till now we did not know about how tyres manufactured in India matched up to those manufactured as per international standards. In America and other western nations, silicon is added to the rubber in tyres. This ensures that there are less complaints about tyre bursts. Second, if instead of normal air, nitrogen is used in tyres, it stays cool. We are thinking of making both these things mandatory,” Gadkari said in the House while replying to the starred question asked by BJP MP Harnath Singh Yadav.The minister also informed the House that on the “cement and concrete highway”, 133 people died in 2016, 146 in 2017 and 11 in 2018.Earlier, Trinamool Congress members staged a walkout over the proposed disinvestment of 42 PSUs in the Union Budget. When MP Dola Sen enquired about the status of her notice on the issue, Chairman M Venkaiah Naidu told her that as he had conveyed to her in his chamber too, the matter is under consideration. There were some disruptions during which Naidu said, “This is not the way. I will never get work done under pressure.” He also denied Trinamool MP Sukhendu Sekhar Roy’s point of order, asking how he could raise it when his party was not in order. The Trinamool MPs walked out after a few minutes of disruptions.Naidu finished not only all the Zero Hour notices but also took up special mentions during the first hour. However, he retracted his earlier directive that ministers would have to reply to all Zero Hour issues, saying that he had gone wrong in his “enthusiasm” and that was not possible.DMK members, too, staged a walkout after party leader Tiruchi Siva raised the issue of NEET. “The Tamil Nadu Legislative Assembly unanimously passed two Bills, which have come to the Union government. Now, it has been revealed in the Supreme Court that the Home Ministry has rejected the proposal of the Tamil Nadu Legislative Assembly… this is totally against the spirit of federalism. Disowning the decision of the State Legislature is not acceptable… in protest, we walk out,” Siva said. AIADMK leader Navneethakrishnan too raised the same issue. Related News last_img read more