Razor Clam Digs Open Daily Through May 4

first_imgFacebook55Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by The Washington Department of Fish and WildlifeState shellfish managers today approved a series of razor clam digs beginning Sunday, April 27, at Twin Harbors and Long Beach.The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved digs at those two beaches each morning through May 4. Mocrocks beach also is open to razor clam digging May 2 through May 4.WDFW gave the OK for the series of digs after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat. No digging will be allowed on any beach after noon.Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, noted that more razor clam digs could be announced for mid-May.“We’ll look at harvest levels after these upcoming digs are finished and determine whether we have enough clams to offer more opportunities in May,” he said.The upcoming digs are scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:Apr. 27, Sunday, 5:53 a.m., -0.3 feet, Twin Harbors, Long BeachApr. 28, Monday, 6:39 a.m., -0.8 feet, Twin Harbors, Long BeachApr. 29, Tuesday,  7:22 a.m., -1.1 feet, Twin Harbors, Long BeachApr. 30, Wednesday, 8:03 a.m., -1.2 feet, Twin Harbors, Long BeachMay 01, Thursday, 8:43 a.m., -1.0 feet, Twin Harbors, Long BeachMay 02, Friday, 9:23 a.m., -0.7 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, MocrocksMay 03, Saturday, 10:04 a.m., -0.3 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, MocrocksMay 04, Sunday, 10:47 a.m., 0.1 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, MocrocksUnder state law, diggers can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container. Diggers may not harvest any part of another person’s daily limit, unless they possess a designated harvester card.Clam diggers and other beachgoers should avoid disturbing western snowy plovers, said Brock Hoenes, WDFW wildlife biologist. The small white birds, which nest on the state’s coastal beaches from April through August, are listed under the federal Endangered Species Act as threatened and by the state as endangered.last_img read more

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Saint Martin’s University Women’s Basketball Finalizes 2015-16 Schedule

first_imgSubmitted by Saint Martin’s UniversitySaint Martin’s University women’s basketball coach Tim Healy finalized the 2015-16 women’s basketball schedule that highlights 15 home games for the Saints.SMU will open its season with three exhibition games seeing The Evergreen State University on Nov. 2 in Marcus Pavilion and then will travel to Eastern Washington on Nov. 8. The Saints will also host University of Puget Sound on Nov. 10 and open the regular season at home against Warner Pacific on Nov. 17.Then it is off to Monmouth, Ore., for the WOU Tournament as SMU will face Northwest University on Nov. 21 and Chico State University on Nov. 22.SMU will play one more tournament and travel to Colorado Springs, Colo., for the UCCS Tournament and face Fort Lewis College on Nov. 27 and University of Colorado-Colorado Springs on Nov. 28.The Saints will open the Great Northwest Athletic Conference play on Dec. 3 in Marcus Pavilion and face newcomer Concordia University and see Western Oregon on Dec. 5.Saint Martin’s will play two more nonconference games before the break in California Baptist on Dec. 11 and Quest University on Dec. 12. Both games will be played in Marcus Pavilion.After the holiday break, SMU will hit the road and see Northwest Nazarene on Dec. 31 and Central Washington on Jan. 2.The Saints will play its final two games of the regular season in Marcus Pavilion on Feb. 18 against Alaska Anchorage and Feb. 20 against Alaska before closing out GNAC play on Feb. 25 at WOU and Feb. 27 at Concordia.Healy begins his 22nd season on the sideline at SMU and is returning seven players from the squad that finished 11-16 overall and 8-10 in conference play and competed at its second consecutive GNAC Tournament.Click Here for full schedule. Facebook0Tweet0Pin0last_img read more

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Rob Rice Homes Experts: Tips to Winterize Your Home

first_imgTip #3 – Fertilize in the fall “If you are looking to fertilize one time a year, fall is the time to do it,” says Ernie Unroe, co-owner of Pacific West Landscaping that does all the lawns and expansive landscaping for Rob Rice Homes. “You want to find something that is lower in nitrogen, a fertilizer that promotes root growth for your lawn.” Glen says that Rob Rice uses an architectural 30-year shingle that will last on a home 25 to 30 years with proper maintenance. Glen recommends cleaning off the roof in the spring and fall. Here are the top tips to winterize your home from the folks that partner with the area’s Best of South Sound builder to build Rob Rice Homes. The tips require little more than walking around and observing your roof, paint and landscaping. The fixes are simple, affordable and can prevent serious damage. “People try to wash their cars in the spring and the water runs down their walls and they wonder why,” says Eric. “We ask them if they left their hose connected and it is always “yes”. Tip #2 – Inspect your roof “When you change your clocks, inspect and clean your roof, blow it off and clean your gutters,” says Glen Paine, co-owner of Legends Roofing Company that sets the roof on each Rob Rice Home. “Look for damage or clogs in the roof valleys or around skylights. Check your protrusions—your vents and your plumbing pipe flashings for any problems.” “Nitrogen produces the top growth. If there is too much top growth and you get a hard freeze, it is destroyed. When you strengthen the root system to be heartier through the winter, it will give the lawn a much bigger boost for the spring.” Ernie says late October or early November is a good time for fall fertilizer.Have your heating system checked once a year.Tip #4 – Protect your heating system “Keep your heating system operating at its peak performance through regular maintenance—once a year—by a qualified and factory trained company,” says Matt Jones,  construction project manager for Sunset Air, the local company that installs energy efficient HVAC systems in Rob Rice Homes. Matt says that there are simple things homeowners can do themselves that are vitally important to the overall health of their system. Rob Rice is Thurston County’s largest local home builder and was voted the Best of South Sound for 2013 and 2014. He has built more than 3000 homes over the last 30 years. He and his wife Helena live in Olympia with their two sons; Alex Michael and Carson. Rob is a graduate of Washington State University with degrees in construction management and architecture. “Scrape the paint off, caulk the cracks and fix the paint. If water gets in cracks and the wood gets wet from behind, the wood can curl up.” “If you are cleaning off your roof regularly with a hose—and please don’t use a pressure washer—it keeps moss from growing. My house is 12 years old and I clean it off once a year and I have no signs of moss. After a heavy rain and wind storm I look it over and check my gutters.” Larry explains the simple process to correct any problems before they cause more damage.center_img “You also need to wash the dirt off of the house once or twice a year. People never wash their houses. Dirt eats away at the paint because the dust and the air move over them. A dirty home can develop mildew too.” “The simplest way to help your system operate efficiently is to regularly change or clean the filters (if washable). The build up of dust particulate in the filter can be harmful to a system. The clogged filter restricts airflow, which makes the furnace work harder to move the air throughout the house. The stress on the furnace can lead to failures of mechanical parts down the road. Not only does it hinder the performance and longevity of the equipment, but it also hinders the indoor air quality and potential comfort in the home.” Submitted by Rob Rice HomesWalk around your home and use these simple tips to protect your investment.Each Rob Rice Home is built with superior construction and products, but maintaining that high quality over the years requires regular home maintenance. Ernie explains that of the three numbers that represent fertilizers, the first number is nitrogen. “The second two numbers should be higher in your fall fertilizer.”The fall, he explains, is not the time to promote top growth. Eric explains that when homeowners leave their hoses connected, the water can freeze and break the hose bib and that leaves the potential for freezing back in the water line. “If there is water in the line it is the only way the freeze plug – a safety feature inside of the hose – can break.” If moss becomes a problem, Glen recommends Lily Miller’s “Moss Off” with a pump sprayer. Keep the paint on your home looking new by washing your home every year.Tip #5 – Check your paint & wash your house“Make sure there is no peeling or cracking paint on your home because if water gets in there and freezes it makes it worse,” Larry Hanson Imperial Printing LLC who has been using superior paint products on Rob Rice Homes for more than 30 years. “It can even make the wood crack. The longer you wait, the worse it gets.” Facebook55Tweet0Pin0 Tip #1 – Disconnect your hosesThe number one thing Eric Davis tells homeowners is to disconnect their hoses before winter hits. He should know as he is the building superintendent at our communities of Kensington in Lacey and The Villages at South Hill in Puyallup.Be sure your hose is disconnected to protect against damage from freezing.It is so important, that Eric reminds everyone in the final ‘walk out’ of their home to disconnect their hoses for winter. “But, every year people still forget to do it and we get calls in the spring.” Larry provides another simple tip to protect your home’s paint job.last_img read more

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Oysters, Canoeing and Cleaning Up The Waterways

first_imgOH, OYSTERS!FILM AND PANEL DISCUSSIONASBURY PARK – On Saturday, Oct. 20, the American Littoral Society is hosting Oh, Oysters! A Celebration of Re-Oystering New Jersey’s Waters to raise funds for coastal conservation and bring awareness to the plight of the once prolific Eastern Oyster. The event will include a reception (beer, wine, soft drinks, heavy hors d’oeuvres and a raw bar) prior to a screening of the 90-minute “The Oyster Farmers” film, as well as a panel discussion with the featured farmers, society staff and other experts. The event will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. at the House of Independents, 572 Cookman Ave. in Asbury Park. Tickets are $125 and available at littoralsociety.org.NAVESINK RIVER MUNICIPALITIES COMMISSIONRED BANK – The Navesink River Municipalities Commission, an advisory committee formed by representatives of the communities on the Navesink River watershed, meets monthly. The discussion lately has been about how to address the higher-than-acceptable levels of fecal coliform as it relates to restricted shellfish harvest west of the Oceanic bridge. “We have located and fixed a few issues in Fair Haven and Red Bank,” said chairman Brian Rice. “We have some more issues that are being assessed and will be fixed as well.Rice said that, along with representatives of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and Clean Ocean Action, the group has put together a citizens scientist program which collects samples to be sent for testing at the NJDEP’s marine water quality monitoring lab in Leeds Point, Atlantic County.The meetings, open to all, are held on the first Wednesday of the month. The next meeting is 7 p.m. Oct. 3 at the Red Bank Borough Hall, 90 Monmouth St.CANOEING, WOODEN BOATS AND POUND BOATSThe Navesink Maritime Heritage Association will be hosting three events on the Navesink in coming weeks.• On Saturday, Sept. 16, canoes will launch from Maple Cove at the north end of Maple Avenue for the Families, Adults, Youths Paddle Day. All are welcome to paddle in colorful River Rangers canoes from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. “This is your last opportunity this year to paddle with family and friends on the idyllic Navesink River,” NMHA says.• On Saturday, Oct. 6, a collection of classic and wooden boats will visit Monmouth Boat Club, 31 Union St. in Red Bank. Members will exhibit their own classic or wooden boats. The public is invited to come see and learn about these “beauties.”• On Wednesday, Oct. 17, local maritime historian Ned Lloyd will present a historical review of the commercial fishing methods and the pound boats that fished off the beaches of New Jersey for 150 years. Beginning with tub trawling and hand line fishing in the early 1800s to the advent of the pound nets that dominated the industry into the early 1960s, the Jersey shore’s unique Sea Bright skiff was well adapted as the pound boat grew and supported these fisheries for more than a century. The event is hosted at Bahrs Landing Restaurant, 1 Bay Ave. in Highlands. Come at 7:30 p.m. for coffee and cookies, or enjoy refreshments at the restaurant. The presentation lasts from 8 to 9 p.m. Free.RALLY FOR THE NAVESINKThe next Rally for the Navesink meeting will be held from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 27 at Bingham Hall in Rumson. Formed in 2016, the coalition of environmental groups is dedicated to improving Navesink River water quality.RED BANK GUINNESS OYSTER FESTIVALRED BANK – Tons of oysters, pints of Guinness, plus lighter beers and wine, live music and great food are all on tap for the Red Bank Guinness Oyster Festival, fashioned after the 62-year-old Galway Oyster Festival celebrating the opening of the oyster season. It is a huge food and music festival which will showcase Red Bank’s excellent restaurants as well as entertain thousands with great live music and family fun. Please note: Due to borough ordinance, pets are not allowed (service dogs only). Due to increased security all bags are subject to search.BAHRS OFFERS LOCAL CATCH TO BENEFIT CLEAN OCEAN ACTIONHIGHLANDS – Through Sept. 23, the last day of “The Bahrs’ 100 Year Summer,” restaurant owner Jay Cosgrove is offering the local catch of the day. $1 from each dish – like grilled yellow fin tuna and baked Jersey bluefish – benefits Clean Ocean Action. Bahrs has joined other Jersey Shore restaurants in replacing single-use items like plastic straws with more sustainable items, such as the paper straw that now comes in the Frozen Lobster Claw beverage. Bahrs is located at 2 Bay Ave.OFFSHORE WIND PUBLIC MEETINGSLONG BRANCH – The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection is alerting the public to three meetings and one webinar being hosted by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) in September. The public meetings will discuss the feedback BOEM has received in the recently published Call for Information and Nominations (Call) for potential offshore wind energy leas- ing and development in the Bight. One of the meetings will be held in Monmouth County from 5 to 7:45 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 20 at the Long Branch Library, 328 Broadway. The webinar hosted by BOEM will be held Tuesday, Sept. 25 from 1 to 4 p.m. at orep.adobeconnect.com/nybightareaid/. There is no cost to participate in the meetings or webinar.This article was first published in the Sept. 13-20, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

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Saints fill netminder hole with addition of James Prigione

first_imgGoalies are supposed to rotate during the season and not in the off-season.For the fourth time this off-season the Selkirk Saints added a netminder.The Saints announced the playing commitment from goaltender James Prigione (Guelph, ON) to attend Selkirk College and compete for the Saints beginning in the 2013/14 B.C. Intercollegiate Hockey League season.Prigione fills a hole created when Myles Hovdebo decided skip Selkirk for a chance to play at the University of Calgary. “Myles had a great opportunity to compete at the CIS level that he couldn’t turn down,” said Saints skipper Jeff Dubois.”We’re very pleased for him, and also glad that we were able to bring James on board to fill a very important role with our team.”Former Nelson Leafs goalie Marcus Beasley also decided not to attend Selkirk after agreeing to a letter of commitment.The 22-year old Prigione closed out his junior career in 2012 with the Ontario Junior Hockey League’s Oakville Blades, posting a 17-7-2 record in 28 regular season games.He led all OJHL netminders with a 2.04 goals-against average and .932 save-percentage and won the league’s Top Goaltender award for the 2011/12 season.Prigione’s strong play carried over into the playoffs, where he once again topped the OJHL with a 1.91 GAA and .940 SV% over 11 starts while leading the Blades to a berth in the West Division finals. Prigione has also made a trio of Major Junior appearances with his hometown Guelph Storm of the Ontario Hockey League, picking up a pair of wins and recording a 2.09 GAA and .918 SV% during the 2008/09 and 2009/10 seasons. “We’re very excited to add a goaltender of James’ ability and experience level to our team,” said Dubois.”James is an athletic goaltender who put together a tremendous season as a 20-year old in Oakville. I expect him to step in to our line-up and be a big contributor in the BCIHL.” Prigione plans to study Business Administration at Selkirk College. “I’m excited to continue my education out west and have the opportunity to play for such a successful hockey program,” said Prigione, who describes himself as an athletic goaltender with quick foot speed and strong positional play.”I’m also looking forward to meeting my new teammates and spending time with family in the area. I love the idea of playing in a region so rich in hockey tradition, and hopefully contributing to another BCIHL championship at Selkirk.” Prigione is the second goaltender and 10th player overall to commit to the Saints for the 2013/14 season. He joins forwards Darnell Dyck (Langley, BCHL), Markus McCrea (Youngstown, USHL) and Garrett Kucher (Osoyoos, KIJHL), blueliners Stefan Gonzales (Aldergrove, PJHL), David Mead (Wenatchee Wild, NAHL), Arie Postmus (Beaver Valley, KIJHL), Ryan Procyshyn (Delta, PJHL) and Tanner Lenting (North Delta, PJHL) and goaltender Aaron Oakley (Abbotsford, PJHL).last_img read more

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Ex-Leaf sinks old team as Boycuzk scores in OT to power Hawks to 3-1 Murdoch series lead

first_imgA former Nelson Leaf player came back to haunt his own teammates.Jacob Boyczuk scored at the 1:32 mark of the first overtime period to lift the Beaver Valley Nitehawks to a 2-1 Kootenay International Junior Hockey League playoff victory over the Nelson Leafs Tuesday night in Fruitvale.The victory gives the Hawks a 3-1 stranglehold in the best-of-seven Murdoch Final.Game five is set for Thursday night back in the Heritage City. Puck drop is 7 p.m. at the NDCC Arena. Game four was nothing like the 7-0 pasting Beaver Valley put on the Leafs the night before.Fact is it was Nelson that took a 1-0 lead early in the second period following a scoreless opening frame.KIJHL regular season scoring champion Jamie Vlanich gave the Green and White to the lead with a power play marker.Beaver Valley tied the game with its own power play tally later in the frame as Archie McKinnon scored with assists to Braden Fuller and Dallas Calvin.In the third Beaver Valley pushed for the winning tally, controlling much of the period out shooting the Leafs 15-9. But Patrick Zubick had a bounce-back game in the Nelson nets after getting pulled 25 minutes into Monday’s Game three.The hometown Hawks out shot the Leafs 40-36 in the contest making a winner out of Brett Clark.ICE CHIPS: Ryan Edwards, with an assist on the game winner by Jacob Boyczuk, and Dallas Calvin each tallied a point to add to their playoff point total. Calvin leads the KIJHL playoff scoring with 15 points. Edwards is two points behind in third spot. Nelson’s Carsen Willans is locked in a four-way tie for fourth in playoff scoring with 13 points. . . Leaf defenceman Robson Cramer sat out his first game of his suspension after receiving a match penalty during Game three. . . . In the Eddie Mountain Division, Kimberley took a 3-1 series lead over Creston with a 6-3 win in the Bavarian City.last_img read more

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Regular Season Title Within Reach for Selkirk College Saints Hockey Team

first_imgWith three games remaining in the British Columbia Intercollegiate Hockey League (BCIHL) regular season, the Selkirk College Saints hold the fate of home ice advantage for the post season in their own hands.Coming off a pair of playoff-like contests against rival Simon Fraser University this past weekend at the Castlegar & District Recreation Centre, each team captured a victory which means the Saints can finish first overall in the league by closing out the season on a winning streak.“It’s now up to us,” says Saints head coach Brent Heaven. “We have the opportunity to clinch home ice throughout the playoffs and give ourselves the best opportunity to succeed.”Simon Fraser came into the weekend as the BCIHL’s top team and after a back-and-forth opening period on Friday night, the game stayed level at zeroes. Early in the second period, Saints’ forward Alex Milligan scored on the powerplay to give the home side the lead, but four minutes later Simon Fraser’s Michael Sandor tied the game.A mere 11 seconds after that, rookie Marcel Fuchs restored the Selkirk College lead and by the midway point of the middle period, Tylor Branzen and Ryon Sookro would make the advantage 4-1.Simon Fraser added to a wild second period with a goal by Mathew Berry-Lamontagna to close the gap and Jono Ceci made it close midway through the third period, but Selkirk College held on for the 4-3 victory.“It was an extremely exciting game and it was good to see some guys get rewarded for hard work,” says Heaven.“Overall it was a good, solid playoff atmosphere. Those are the games you are going to expect to have to play and it’s a battle.” On Saturday night, it was the Saints who came out strong in the first period with defenceman Arie Postmus scoring his first goal of the season and Branzen adding a powerplay marker for a 2-0 first period lead.The Clan scored with two minutes left in the second period to narrow the gap and with 37 second remaining on the clock in third, Berry-Lamontagna scored to send the game into overtime.Though the Saints dominated the overtime period, Simon Fraser goaltender Jordan Liem kept the puck out of the net. The game went to shootout where the visitors came out on top to steal the victory.Despite the loss, Heaven says the outstanding play of veteran goaltender James Prigione over the entire weekend came at the perfect time.“James was fantastic for us last year in playoffs, he was one of the big reasons why we were able to succeed,” Heaven says of the team’s third straight league title last March.“He has had the opportunity to carry most of the weight this season and we’re extremely happy with what he has been able to do. Hopefully he can sustain that because goaltending will be important when the playoffs begin.”After the dust settled on weekend action, Simon Fraser continues to hold a one-point advantage in the standings but the Saints have a game-in-hand.The Saints and SFU will complete their third game in a row on Friday night in Burnaby where the stakes will be even higher. They then travel to Trinity Western University on Saturday night to take on the formidable Spartans.The regular season wraps up at home on Saturday, March 5 when the Eastern Washington University Eagles visit Castlegar.“Compared to other buildings in our league, the atmosphere we have in our own rink is huge,” Heaven says of the desire to clinch top spot.“We get 1,000 people to the games for playoffs and it’s huge to play in a loud building where there is support from fellow students and the great hockey fans in our communities. When we are in a situation to succeed, the fans really get behind us and give us that extra spark we need.”The Saints have clinched a playoff spot. The first best-of-three round will take place on the March 11-13 weekend and the league championship series is set for March 18-20.last_img read more

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CALIFORNIA-BRED WARREN’S VENEDA IS SMASHING 7 ¼ LENGTH WINNER OF GRADE I, $400,000 SANTA MARGARITA STAKES; WARREN HOMEBRED MARE RIDDEN BY BAZE AND TRAINED BY LEWIS

first_imgARCADIA, Calif. (March 14, 2015)–California-bred Warren’s Veneda firmly established herself as the West Coast’s top older filly or mare with a sensational 7 ¼ length win in Saturday’s Grade I, $400,000 Santa Margarita Stakes, as she negotiated 1 1/8 miles under Tyler Baze in 1:48.73.Conditioned by Craig Lewis, the 5-year-old chestnut mare by Affirmative registered her third win in-a-row and followed up on a career-best 2 ¾ length win in the Grade II Santa Maria Stakes on Feb. 14. Drawn outside in a field of six older fillies and mares, Warren’s Veneda was hung three-wide while last into the Club House turn and cruised to the leaders while in-hand under Baze going to the far turn. Three-wide turning for home she lengthened her considerable stride and put her competition away with a furlong to run.“The last three times I’ve ridden her, she just does things so easy,” said Baze. “I haven’t gotten to the bottom of her yet. There’s so much horse under me and she just does what she needs to do to win…Usually, if you’re sitting mid-pack, horses won’t flick their ears back and forth and just relax, but she was…and was totally relaxed.“Craig tells me she’s only getting better and she proved it today. She’s special. She’s named after Mr. Warren’s late wife, so I know how special this is for him.”Owned by her breeder, Benjamin, C. Warren, Warren’s Veneda provided Warren, who has owned and bred horses in California for 35 years, with his first-ever Grade I win.“Out of our 800 horses, that’s the best win, the biggest,” said Warren, who currently resides in Las Vegas.The 3-2 favorite, Warren’s Veneda paid $5.00, $2.60 and $2.20. The Santa Margarita was her eighth win from 22 career starts, and with the winner’s share of $240,000, she increased her earnings to $827,612.“I was pretty confident that she was going to win, but I didn’t think that she would be that dominating, because I thought the two Eastern fillies (runner-up Dame Dorothy and early pace setter Cassatt) looked awful good on paper,” said Lewis. “We’re thinking about the Charles Town Classic (versus males on April 18). We’re going to have to take on some pretty tough boys, but she could be up to the task.”Dame Dorothy, who shipped in from South Florida for trainer Todd Pletcher, stalked the early pace and overhauled Thegirlinthatsong and Uzziel late to run second by a half length. Ridden by Rafael Bejarano, Dame Dorothy was the second choice at 2-1 and paid $3.20 and $2.60.Ridden by Mike Smith, Thegirlinthatsong was off at 8-1 and finished third, a half length in front of Uzziel and paid $2.80 to show.Fractions on the race were 23.15, 46.64, 1:10.68 and 1:35.79.First post time for a nine-race card on Sunday is at 12:30 p.m. Admission gates open at 10:30 a.m. –30–last_img read more

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