Find Out Annie Potts’ Favorite Part of Swinging in Pippin

first_img Annie Potts The Tony-winning revival of Pippin is filled with awe-inspiring feats, but one of the musical’s show-stopping moments belongs to Annie Potts. The Emmy nominee is having a ball as the trapeze-swinging, “No Time at All”-belting Berthe, but she must have been nervous about the circus act, right? Nope. Potts swung by Today on February 11, and told hosts Kathie Lee Gifford and Hoda Kotb that the trapeze is her favorite part. “I’m up there with this beautiful boy who is mighty,” she gushed. Potts also talked about her musical theater background, a car accident that almost ended her career and Designing Women. Star Files Pippin Related Shows View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 4, 2015last_img read more

Read More »

Sunbelt Expo

first_imgVisitors to the 32nd annual Sunbelt Agricultural Exposition learned about the latest agricultural equipment, technology and information firsthand Oct. 20-22. They also got to watch college deans go udder-to-udder in a milking contest and witness the unexpected birth of baby roaches.The Sunbelt Expo, billed as “North American’s Premier Farm Show,” draws more than 200,000 visitors to Moultrie, Ga., each year to see more than 1,100 exhibitors.The Sunbelt Expo is not just one of the largest farm shows in the world, it’s become a leading educational venue for agriculture, said Scott Angle, UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences dean and director.“From row crops to aquaculture to livestock to home gardening, our faculty’s on-site research trials and seminars are well attended and received throughout the three-day event,” he said. “And each year, we are able tell our story directly to the thousands of visitors who stop by our building here. It’s also a great opportunity to recruit those students who will one day be Georgia’s leaders.”Midday on the first day, visitors to the UGA building got to see a roach in CAES entomologist Paul Guillebeau’s insect display give birth. The dozen or more cloudy-white babies scurried around the display, designed to look like a family kitchen. Though not for everyone, the scene was a rare sight to see live, Guillebeau said.CAES also spotlighted agrosecurity, renewable energy sources, farming conservation, UGA Cooperative Extension, student recruitment and plant breeding, along with live musical entertainment and 4-H Clovers and Company dancers.Angle competed in an old-fashioned milking contest against college of agriculture deans from Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College, Auburn University and the University of Florida. Auburn University College of Agriculture Dean Richard Guthrie squeezed out the victory.Florida cattleman Cary Lightsey won the 20th annual Swisher Sweets/Sunbelt Expo Southeastern Farmer of the Year award, announced each year during a first-day luncheon. Each year, 10 southeastern states each send a farmer to compete for the title. Georgia’s state winner was Tifton vegetable farmer Bill Brim.“Though Bill didn’t win the regional award, he is recognized as an innovator and a well-established leader in Georgia agriculture,” Angle said. “His on-farm collaborations with our college’s research and Extension faculty, particularly with those on our Tifton campus, continue to solve problems for what is a major part of Georgia’s economy.”last_img read more

Read More »

Seaport Global analysts project sharp drop in U.S. thermal coal exports in 2019 and 2020

first_imgSeaport Global analysts project sharp drop in U.S. thermal coal exports in 2019 and 2020 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($): U.S. thermal coal exports are expected to fall as much as 12% in 2019 and 25% in 2020 given the declining Northern European delivered price, which will put pressure on the U.S. utility and lower-grade U.S. metallurgical prices, Seaport Global analysts wrote April 8.Since October 2018, when the S&P Global Platts CIF ARA was assessed above $100/t, the price front-month CIF ARA price has dropped about 47% to $55.05/t on April 5. The price level for healthy U.S. exporters, Seaport senior analyst Mark Levin and senior associate analyst Nathan Martin wrote, is between $80/t and $90/t, based off the API2 price, with $75/t as the lower limit to keep exports afloat.On April 5, the analysts noted an API2 price of $74/t.Several U.S. producers have locked in tons into the export market at fixed prices, but “a lot of coal that was previously targeted for the export market could find its way back into the U.S. domestic utility market later [in 2019] and in 2020,” Levin and Martin wrote, which would put extra pressure on U.S. utility prices in heavy thermal export regions such as Northern Appalachia and the Illinois Basin.Approximately 54 million tonnes were exported into Europe and Asia when the front-month price averaged $92/t for the year, compared with exports averaging 35 million tonnes in the preceding five years when the price averaged $72/t.Levin and Martin listed a mild winter in Europe, weak natural gas prices, restriction in Australian imports into China, along with more Russian coal making its way into Europe as reasons why the price has dropped so significantly.More ($): Seaport: Falling U.S. thermal coal exports to put pressure on local utility marketlast_img read more

Read More »

Impact of Paper Products

first_imgDear EarthTalk: Are any major brands of disposable tissues, paper towels, napkins and toilet paper yet using recycled content and chlorine-free bleaching? — Sylvia Comstock, Montpelier, VTNot many. In fact, some of the biggest names in disposable paper products are the worst offenders. According to the nonprofit Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), forests at home and abroad are being destroyed to make toilet paper, facial tissues, paper towels and other disposable paper products. Giant paper producers such as Kimberly-Clark (Scott, Cottonelle, Kleenex and Viva) and Procter & Gamble (Puffs, Charmin and Bounty) are, in the words of NRDC, “forcing the destruction of our continent’s most vibrant forests, and devastating the habitat for countless wildlife species in the process.”Much of the virgin pulp used by these large manufacturers comes from Canada’s boreal forest. Some 500,000 acres of boreal forest in Ontario and Alberta alone—key habitat for caribou, lynx, wolves and scores of birds—are felled each year to provide pulp for disposable paper. Beyond wildlife concerns, Canada’s boreal forest, which stretches from coast to coast, comprises perhaps the world’s largest terrestrial storehouse of carbon dioxide, so it is critical to keep it intact to help mitigate global warming.Kimberly-Clark uses some 1.1 million cubic meters of trees from Canada’s boreal forests each year to produce 465,000 metric tons of pulp. Only 19 percent of the pulp it uses to make home use disposable paper products comes from recycled sources. Some of its brands, including Kleenex and Scott, contain no recycled content whatsoever. Nor do Procter and Gamble’s Bounty, Charmin or Puffs, says NRDC.Another issue with tissue (and paper overall) is the use of chlorine for whitening. Chlorine used in many bleaching processes contributes to the formation of dioxins and furans, chemicals that end up in our air and water and can cause cancer. Safer processes use oxygen compounds and result in paper that is “totally chlorine free,” “process chlorine free” (chlorine free except for recycled fibers that were previously chlorine-bleached) or “elemental chlorine free,” which substitutes safer chlorine dioxide for chlorine.NRDC and other groups are pressuring the tissue products industry to change its ways, and are working to educate consumers about their options when buying tissue paper products. NRDC’s online “Shopper’s Guide to Home Tissue Products” offers reams of free advice on which brands to look for—and which to avoid. Marcal is the only household name that NRDC rates high on paper sourcing (100 percent recycled and 40 to 60 percent post-consumer content) and chlorine use (process chlorine-free). Brands ranking highest (up to 80 percent post-consumer content and process-chlorine free) include 365 (the Whole Foods brand), Seventh Generation, Earth First, and Planet, among others. No brands are totally chlorine free.In general, consumers should seek out brands that specifically tout use of 100 percent recycled materials with a high percentage (40 percent or more) of post-consumer waste, and not just keywords like “green” or “eco” on their labels, which may be misleading. Also, before you even purchase that next roll of disposable paper think about how you can reduce the amount you use in the first place. Paper tissues, towels and napkins, for example, have re-usable options in handkerchiefs and cotton towels and napkins.CONTACTS: NRDC Shopper’s Guide to Home Tissue Products, www.nrdc.org/land/forests/gtissue.asp; Kimberly-Clark, www.kimberly-clark.com; Procter & Gamble, www.pg.com.GOT AN ENVIRONMENTAL QUESTION? Send it to: EarthTalk, c/o E/The Environmental Magazine, P.O. Box 5098, Westport, CT 06881; submit it at: www.emagazine.com/earthtalk/thisweek/, or e-mail: earthtalk@emagazine.com. Read past columns at: www.emagazine.com/earthtalk/archives.php.last_img read more

Read More »

Toxic algae is spreading and killing dogs in the southeast

first_imgLook for foam or scum on the water and blue, red, vibrant green or brown colors on top of the water that can resemble spilled paint. Toxic algae can also smell very bad, though animals may be attracted to the odor. North Anna Branch (CONTAINS CHANGES FROM PRIOR ADVISORY; “UPPER” ADDED AND “LOWER” REMOVED) The Virginia Department of Health posted swimming advisories for the following areas of the lake along with safety tips. SEE MAP. Upper – From the upper inundated waters of the Pamunkey arm of the lake downstream to the confluence with Terry’s RunMiddle – From the confluence of Terry’s Run with Pamunkey Creek downstream to Rt. 612 (Stubbs Bridge)Terrys Run – from the upper inundated waters of the lake downstream to the confluence with Pamunkey Creek Pamunkey Branch (NO CHANGE FROM PRIOR ADVISORY) Recent warm water conditions make favorable conditions for an algae bloom. The toxic algae can bloom in freshwater and saltwater and may be hard to spot. The Department of Health advises the public to avoid contact with the Upper and Middle Pamunkey Branches as well as the Upper and Middle North Anna Branches of Lake Anna. Photo from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife: A blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) bloom at Clear Lake, Lake County, California, resulted in oxygen depletion in the water and the subsequent mortality of multiple aquatic species, including carp, catfish, bluegill and crappie. CDFW photos taken Aug. 1, 2016 by Kirsten Macintyre.https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ Routine monitoring occurs monthly above Route 208 on Lake Anna. Test results indicate samples collected on July 30 at sites within these areas contained potentially harmful algae (cyanobacteria) that exceed safe swimming levels. According to WDBJ the Virginia Department of Health said the same toxic algae has been spotted in the counties of Orange, Louisa and Spotsylvania County. Dog owners: beware. A toxic blue-green algae known as cyanobacteria has killed four dogs in North Carolina and Georgia this week. The dogs died after swimming in, and most likely drinking, algae-contaminated water, leading to liver failure.  Toxic algae is killing dogs in the southeast Cyanobacteria can cause skin rash and gastrointestinal illness, such as upset stomach, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. If you have been exposed to contaminated water, wash off with fresh water as soon as possible and monitor symptoms. Upper – From the upper inundated waters of the North Anna arm of the lake downstream to the Rt. 522 Bridge.Middle – From the Rt. 522 Bridge downstream to the Lumsden Flats / Rose Valley cove Symptoms of exposure in dogs include diarrhea, vomiting, weakness, drooling, difficulty breathing or seizures. If your dog experiences any of these symptoms, take the animal directly to the vet.  Avoid contact with any area of the lake where water is green or an advisory sign is posted,Do not allow children or pets to drink from natural bodies of water.Keep children and pets out of the areas experiencing a harmful algae bloom and quickly wash them off with plenty of fresh, clean water after coming into contact with algae scum or bloom water.If you or your animals experience symptoms after swimming in or near an algal bloom, seek medical/veterinarian care.To ensure fish fillets are safe to eat, properly clean fish by removing skin and discarding all internal organs, and cooking fish to the proper temperature.If you suspect you experienced health-related effects following exposure to a bloom, contact the Virginia Harmful Algal Bloom Hotline at 1-888-238-6154.To learn more about harmful algae blooms or to report an algae bloom or fish kill visit www.SwimHealthyVA.com. WHEN IN DOUBT, STAY OUT!last_img read more

Read More »

Long Island Potholes Worse Than Last Year

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Nearly five feet of snow has fallen on Long Island amid an especially harsh winter, opening up more potholes on local roadways than the moon has craters—frustrating drivers and road crews.The cost of pothole repairs on roadways maintained by New York State in Nassau and Suffolk counties has nearly quadrupled from $354,877 last year to $1,397,193 so far this year, according to the state Department of Transportation. Driver advocates and government officials on both sides of the county line also report increases this season.“Oh, it’s definitely worse this year,” said Chris McBride, the Community Transportation Specialist for the American Automobile Association (AAA). “I’ve noticed throughout January, and now into February, a lot more potholes than usual. It’s like a minefield out there.”Nearly 59 inches of snow has fallen on the region as of early March, well above the average of about 20 inches by now, according to Upton-based National Weather Service forecasters.Potholes are formed when water seeps below the pavement, freezes, expands and causes the asphalt above to bend and crack. The pressure of thousands of vehicles running over the weakened point in the roadway then causes the street to crumble. Areas where water is closer to the surface tend to have more potholes.The cycle turned stretches of Long Island Expressway, among other roadways, into Swiss cheese.“In just two days [in February], crews used 136 tons of asphalt to repair potholes on the Long Island Expressway,” said Eileen Peters, the LI regional spokeswoman for the state transportation department. She added that the agency has responded to over a 1,000 pothole reports.Nassau and Suffolk county officials said the price tag for pothole repairs was not yet available, but there were signs that this year is worse than before in both counties.“As of the middle of last week, we received 88 pothole complaints [for Suffolk roads], which were up 10 percent from last year,” Vanessa Baird-Streeter, a Suffolk spokeswoman, said last month. “We’re trying to repair the potholes as quickly as possible… however, you have to be very cognizant of the roadways.”Michael Martino, a spokesman for the Nassau County Department of Public Works, said his agency has responded to more than 100 calls as of early March.“The majority of pothole reports received by the County are for non-County roads,” he added.Hempstead town officials declared “war on potholes” after a Levittown man reportedly started filling the holes himself out of frustration.The AAA’s McBride said his group usually receives the most calls about potholes toward the end of the winter season. But, because of the repeated snowstorms that has have pounded the region, pothole complaints have come in sooner than expected.“There’s certain stretches of roads where you tend to get a lot of them,” he said. “Those areas are just a lot worse than normal this year.”With two more weeks of winter left before the spring solstice—and the possibility of more snow beyond that—McBride warns drivers to slow down and be on the lookout for potholes to avoid damage to their vehicles.“Obey the speed limit,” he said. “Keep your speeds down because it will give you more time to react if there is a pothole in front of you.”To report potholes call the NYS Pothole hotline at 1-800-POTHOLE.last_img read more

Read More »

More data doesn’t make a better CEO

first_img 178SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Ask for predictive insight rather than historical data. This practice guards against another problem CEOs face as they gather information from their teams: almost all the data they get is about what has already happened, not what will happen.Therefore, one of the best forms of data the CEO can collect is the answer to this simple question: “Will your group achieve its goals on time?” In answering, the functional leader can mentally place his or her group’s data in the context of organizational priorities (step 1) and make an informed forecast.If you’d like to get some specific best practices on how to get useful, forward-looking insight from your team, I hope you’ll join us on May 24, 2015, at 1:00pm EDT for a webinar: “Why Big Data Isn’t What CEOs Need.” You can register here. Hope to see you there! As you have surely heard many times over the past few years, big data is opening a lot of doors for modern organizations. Leaders are told again and again about the virtues of being “data driven.”But the many valid uses of big data aside, it’s even more important for CEOs and leaders to guard themselves against the data deluge. I recently saw a presentation by Frank Spencer, founding principle and creative director of Kedge, and one of his slides hit the nail on the head. It read: “Data-driven approaches become a worn and familiar blanket that leaves us vulnerable to threats while blinding us to new opportunities.”If you jump into the deep end of the data pool, you will very likely reduce your ability to lead your credit union with focus. Big data is great when you have massive, highly variable data sets and machines making the decisions—but it doesn’t necessarily help CEOs lead their organizations day to day.No matter how smart you are, it’s impossible to expect that you can grasp all the functional data generated by the organization—from accounting, lending, marketing, HR, and so on. With the volume of enterprise data projected to grow 50x year-over-year between now and 2020, CEOs are at risk of losing the signal in the noise.If you’ve led as many executive team meetings as I have, you know the pain point here: slide after slide, graph after graph, and the feeling that you’re getting a lot of spin and very little insight about what you really want to know: Are we on track as an organization? Will we meet our objectives?Here’s the approach I advise CEOs to take to ensure they’re getting not just loads of information, but the information they need to run the credit union well: Set clear priorities and metrics to collect data against. The best way to guard against a bottoms-up flow of too much data is to reverse it and come at the problem from the top down. As CEO, ensure that you’ve established a clear destination for the organization, broken that into a few success criteria, and asked functional leaders to communicate their department’s data in terms of those criteria.last_img read more

Read More »

Clinical trials of human H5N1 flu vaccine to start soon

first_imgNov 17, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – Clinical trials of a vaccine designed to keep the H5N1 avian influenza virus from sparking a human flu pandemic will begin early in 2005, the head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) said this week.Under contracts with the NIAID, Aventis Pasteur and Chiron Corp. are each producing 8,000 to 10,000 doses of an H5N1 vaccine based on virus isolated from a human patient who contracted avian flu in Asia this year.In a wide-ranging Nov 15 press briefing on flu research, NIAID Director Anthony Fauci, MD, said, “Production of pilot lots has begun, we expect them to be finished by the end of December, and we expect clinical trials to begin soon thereafter.” He later mentioned January as the month when the trials will probably begin. A recording of the briefing is available on the NIAID Web site.The vaccine will be tested for safety and immunogenicity, or the ability to trigger production of antibodies, Fauci said. Participants will not be exposed to the H5N1 virus, which has caused 44 human cases with 32 deaths in Asia this year.Chiron is making pilot lots of H5N1 vaccine in a plant in Liverpool, England, but it’s not the same plant where contamination problems doomed nearly half of the US flu vaccine supply this fall, Fauci said. The company was expected to supply up to 48 million doses of seasonal flu vaccine to the United States, but the supply was lost when some lots of the vaccine were found to be contaminated and the whole supply was declared unsafe.Fauci said Chiron, which is based in California, has asked the British government to inspect the plant where the H5N1 vaccine is being made. “I do know the Chiron people have asked the UK [United Kingdom] regulators to look at the plant to make sure it’s OK,” he said.Chiron is also under contract to make pilot doses of a human vaccine for H9N2 avian flu, which infected three people in Hong Kong in 1999 and 2003 and is regarded as another possible source of a human pandemic. Fauci said that vaccine is being made in a plant in Siena, Italy.Besides making H5N1 vaccine for the clinical trials, Aventis Pasteur has a separate contract to produce 2 million doses of the vaccine. Fauci said the purpose of that contract is to provide vaccine for public health and laboratory workers and to prepare for mass production of the vaccine in case a pandemic erupts.”It’s going to be much easier for Aventis to go from 2 million up to 50 million than it would be if they were stuck at a pilot of 8,000 to 10,000 [doses],” he said.The H5N1 virus has not yet shown an ability to spread easily from person to person, but many disease experts are worried that it will soon acquire that ability and launch a pandemic. Some experts have said the virus could cause a pandemic on the scale of the Spanish flu of 1918, which killed between 20 million and 50 million people worldwide. Officials have said there is no guarantee that the NIAID’s H5N1 vaccine will work if a pandemic occurs.In response to questions, Fauci said a flu pandemic is probably on the way but not likely to begin in the next few weeks. “If you look at history, it’s unlikely that we’re going to have massive person-to-person spread in December,” he said. “Is it going to happen sometime in the near future? The answer is yes, we’re due for it, but you can’t predict when it’s going to happen.”In other comments, Fauci said he thinks it will be possible, though difficult, to produce a “perennial” flu vaccine—one that doesn’t have to be changed each year to match the circulating strains. “I think we can meet the challenge, but it’s not going to be easy,” he said.Slight changes occur frequently in flu virus surface proteins (hemagglutinin and neuraminidase) that enable the virus to enter and exit human cells. Because these changes permit the virus to evade detection by the immune system and because current vaccines target these proteins, it is necessary to adjust vaccines each year. Flu experts hope to design a vaccine that would target more stable components of the virus, so that it wouldn’t be necessary to change the vaccine every year.Brian Murphy, an NIAID flu expert who attended the roundtable, sounded less optimistic than Fauci about producing a perennial vaccine. He noted that most people have been exposed to many flu strains over the years, yet they become susceptible to the virus again when the surface proteins change.”In order for a perennial vaccine to be effective, you have to make something better [at inducing immunity] than repeated infections with wild-type virus,” he said. “Somebody who has tried to make vaccines for a long time would find that a very difficult task indeed.”See also:NIAID video recording of flu research briefinghttp://videocast.nih.gov/ram/flu111504.ramlast_img read more

Read More »

With bird sacrifices and chants, Cuba’s Santeria seek protection from coronavirus

first_imgTopics : Rituals via social media Some Santeria devotees are also coordinating, largely via social media, small simultaneous rituals performed in self-isolation at home.These are also being done in other Latin American countries like Venezuela where the religion has gained a following.The rollout of mobile internet in Cuba, where most homes do not have online connections, is enabling spiritual communion in times of self isolation.On March 22, for example, Santeria devotees heard they should light two candles at a precise hour and pray to the Orishas for their protection.”May Obatala [one of the main Orishas] protect us from the pandemic,” wrote Magdalena Barrera Valdes on a Facebook group for Santeria practitioners worldwide with 44,000 followers, posting a photo of her candles, on which 76 people commented “ashe” meaning “may it manifest” in Yoruba.Later that day, some Santeria priests, known as babalawos, were said to be imploring Iku, the spirit of death, to not take any more victims. Devotees warned one another to cover their heads to protect themselves as Iku swept across earth during and after the ceremony.”Religion is mainly about faith,” said Rodriguez, “and we want to give people hope.” The risk of spreading the virus has ruled out the large ceremonies of drumming and dancing that characterize Santeria, a religion that fuses Yoruba beliefs and traditions, brought to Cuba by African slaves, with elements of Catholicism.But devotees – of which there are millions in the Caribbean island nation – are turning to their pantheons of Yoruba deities called Orishas for strength in intimate family ceremonies or individual rituals at home.”Every day when I get up, I stand on the porch, look up to the sky and ask God to … send the epidemic away,” said Montoya, who in normal times runs a weekend school teaching Cubans to get in touch with their divine gifts like the ability to hear or see spirits.”Then I light a candle and pray to my Orishas for the whole world,” she said, her thick, twisted Afro locks wound up into a white scarf, as mandated for such Santeria ceremonies.center_img The family of Emilia Montoya, 79, sacrificed four white doves and two roosters, chanted in the African language Yoruba and pounded a wooden staff rhythmically on the floor in a ceremony to protect Montoya from coronavirus.The small gathering in her Havana home appealed to their ancestors and honored Inle, the deity of health in Santeria, a ritual-filled Afro-Cuban religion. Montoya does not have the virus though Cuba has so far reported 170 confirmed cases.”We are calling these blessings upon her to keep her healthy,” said her nephew Henry Rodriguez, 40, leading the ceremony. “But this ceremony isn’t just for us; it’s also for global health.”last_img read more

Read More »

Gold Coast records huge profit on property sales

first_imgGold CoastMore from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa18 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days agoGOLD Coast homeowners are making more than $480 million in profits with new figures confirming a booming property market.The latest CoreLogic Pain and Gain report reveals nine out of 10 property owners made a profit in the December quarter.More than 90 per cent of sales recorded a total profit of $482,076,853 while 8.2 per cent of sales recorded a $15,613,522 loss.The quarterly report tracks home sales across Australia and reveals the proportion of sales being sold at a profit versus those being sold at a loss.“With property values continuing to increase over the final quarter of 2017, albeit at a more moderate pace, the proportion of properties resold at a profit has continued to climb,” Research analyst Cameron Kusher said.last_img read more

Read More »