Get an Extended Sneak Peek at the Into the Woods Film, Including Singing!

first_imgTake a break from staring at those breathtaking Into the Woods photos and feast your eyes on this. We now have an extended sneak peek at the film, including singing. YES, SINGING! Check out the featurette below to get a taste of snippets from the prologue, Meryl Streep’s “Stay With Me” and more! Also look out for James Lapine, Stephen Sondheim and Rob Marshall gushing about the cast, and the cast gushing about Lapine, Sondheim and Marshall. There’s a lot of love. We wish, more than anything, more than the moon, for it to be Christmas already! View Commentslast_img

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Future fuel

first_imgBy K.C. DasUniversity of Georgia Targeted GHG reductions can unintentionally eliminate some promising technologies that are lagging behind because of late starts, such as algae-based biofuels. Anaerobic digestion, a well-developed technology, is not considered because the energy output (methane gas) isn’t a liquid transportation fuel at room temperature. A similar process called landfill bioreactor produces methane biogas which can be converted to compressed natural gas. Its GHG emissions are 17 percent less than its fossil-based equivalent. Anaerobic digestion can create jobs and produce net income to farms and small biofuels producers. UGA researchers are developing a system that combines anaerobic digestion with algae production. Current regulatory policies don’t readily support developing such integrated solutions in early development. More pilot-scale testing could help move them to the marketplace faster. Federal agencies seem focused on large-scale demonstrations before pilot-scale research is completed.Welcomed policy changeCarbon sequestration is a welcomed change in national policy. Current regulatory emphasis favors carbon capture and storage through geological storage of compressed CO2. Although potentially a reliable technique, this approach favors larger-scale sequestration.One example of a smaller-scale method is using biochar, a byproduct of pyrolysis, a high-temperature breakdown of cellulosic materials that produces a liquid hydrocarbon, which could be converted to green diesel or other liquid fuels. Biochar has high carbon content and stays in the soil for decades, increasing agricultural productivity and sequestering carbon for a long time. However, the regulatory framework doesn’t favor developing this technology.There is great promise for biofuels to augment our energy supply. New ideas, technologies and discoveries are emerging from universities and research centers daily. Development and use of these discoveries could be faster if regulatory framework would support deeper exploration into novel crops that don’t pit fuel against food. Encourage innovationWe need policies to encourage processes and technologies that create jobs and income for farms and small businesses. We need support that allows us to investigate diverse feedstocks and low-cost, efficient production methods that protect and enhance the environment. If we are to reach 36 billion gallons of biofuels in our transportation fuel mix by 2022 while reducing GHG emissions, all avenues of exploration must be open and barriers to development removed. (K.C. Das is director of the Biorefining and Carbon Cycling Program with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and Faculty of Engineering. This editorial was presented as testimony before the U.S. House Committee on Small Business’ subcommittee on regulations and healthcare.) The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 charges the U.S. to add 36 billion gallons of biofuels to the country’s transportation fuel mix by 2022. Continued investment in research, development and deployment are required to achieve this goal.Recent scientific studies warn that increasing land use for producing biomass for biofuels would increase greenhouse gas, or GHG, emissions compared to gasoline. Some may disagree with these studies. However, they do show the weakness in expanding a crop-based fuel system without planning for sustainability.If we continue to try to produce more biomass from the current spectrum of crop choices, GHG emission restrictions could put small biofuel producers and family farms at a disadvantage. Reduced emissions require crops that are easier to grow; require less money to plant, harvest and water; and are easier to process. Needed production improvementsCorn ethanol production in the U.S. consumes a quarter of the country’s corn crop. Increasing ethanol production to the targeted 15 billion gallons a year by 2022 will double the corn required. That increase will impact land and water needs and create environmental concerns. We need to improve the productivity of corn and other biofuels crops and incorporate improvements into the production process. Producing lignocellulosic ethanol or other advanced biofuels, or green diesel, is a challenge. Technology development in this field has advanced, but most U.S. facilities are still in the early-demonstration phase. Using existing forestry and agriculture residues for biofuels would have minimal environmental impact while creating opportunity for small businesses and farms.Forestry and agriculture generate significant biomass. According to the Department of Energy and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, forestlands can produce 368 million dry tons of biomass annually. Current legislative definitions make renewable forest biomass off-limits to biofuels companies. Definitions must be changed, while maintaining the resources’ sustainability.Data from the UGA Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources suggests collecting residues and producing chips for biofuel production costs $11 to $12 per ton delivered to mills. Food v. fuelIt’s crucial that we have a diverse source of biomass that doesn’t compete with food supplies. Diversity allows different geographical regions to focus on crops best suited to local conditions. Current federal funding often favors specific feedstocks, hampering development and transfer technology for novel crops. Many novel crops are being explored. For example, a recent UGA study looked at using a multi-benefit winter cover crop, oil seed radish, for its biofuels potential. UGA scientists led a global team in sequencing the sorghum genome and are now working toward understanding how we can use the information to produce biofuels at lower costs in poor soils. Targets eliminate possibilitieslast_img read more

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SUV Crashes Into Great Neck Store, Killing Woman

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 66-year-old woman was killed when an SUV crashed into the Great Neck cell phone store she was in on Monday morning.Nassau County police said a woman was driving a Toyota Rav 4 when she crashed into the AT&T store on Northern Boulevard at 10:51 a.m.The victim, Lizabeth Sbar of Great Neck, was taken to North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, where she was pronounced dead two hours later.Two other people suffered non-life threatening injuries in the crash. The driver and her passenger were not injured.Detectives are continuing the investigation.last_img

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Meadowbrook Parkway Driver Injured by Brick Thrown from Bridge

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Police are searching for a suspect who threw a brick off a Meadowbrook State Parkway bridge on Saturday, hitting the windshield of a BMW and injuring two people riding inside it, authorities said.A 21-year-old Island Park man was driving his car northbound when the brick crashed through his windshield just south of Glenn Curtiss Boulevard in Uniondale, injuring his right shoulder shortly before 8 p.m. Saturday, police said.The 22-year-old West Hempstead woman in the passenger seat suffered an injury to her left eye and bruising to her mouth, police said. The driver declined medical attention, but the woman was treated and released from Nassau University Medical Center.Investigators ask anyone with information regarding this incident to call them at 631-756-3300.  All calls will remain confidential.last_img read more

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Core City yields harden

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Arsenal legend Arsene Wenger reacts to Man City’s Champions League ban

first_img Metro Sport ReporterMonday 17 Feb 2020 3:21 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link1.1kShares Pep Guardiola looks set to stay at City despite the ban (Picture: Getty)‘The point of sport is basically to win, but by respecting the rules. We celebrate the best in every sport but we need to know they respect the rules.‘If that doesn’t happen it is not real sport so that’s why it’s so important. Once you play in a competition you agree to the rules.’Manchester City confirmed they will appeal the ban to the Court of Arbitration for Sport.But even if they are unsuccessful, manager Pep Guardiola looks set to stay at the Etihad, having told his players he was still committed in a meeting on Monday.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man City Arsenal legend Arsene Wenger reacts to Man City’s Champions League ban Advertisement Comment Arsene Wenger has reacted to Manchester City’s Champions League ban (Picture: Sky Sports)Arsenal legend Arsene Wenger has backed UEFA after they banned Manchester City from the Champions League.It was confirmed on Friday evening that Premier League champions City had been suspended from European club competition for the next two seasons.Man City had been found to have committed ‘serious breaches’ of UEFA’s club licensing and financial fair play regulations, and were also ordered to pay a £25m fine.Speaking out on the punishment, former Gunners boss Wenger said: ‘It is important for the clubs to work with the natural income they have. The rules have been created.ADVERTISEMENT‘I am convinced there is an evolution to be made in the way the rules are. But they are what they are and you have to respect them.AdvertisementAdvertisement‘People they don’t respect them by trying to get around the rules in more or less legal ways have to be punished. If it’s proven that this has been done on purpose it cannot be left unpunished.’Wenger was critical of Manchester City’s transfer policy while still in charge of Arsenal and added: ‘They bought all my players, yes! No, I think this is a deep question. Advertisementlast_img read more

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Man City vs Arsenal TV channel, live stream, kick-off time, team news and odds

first_imgAdvertisement Man City vs Arsenal TV channel, live stream, kick-off time, team news and odds Pep Guardiola and Mikel Arteta meet for the first time as managers on Wednesday (Picture: Getty Images)The Premier League returns from the coronavirus hiatus on Wednesday night and Manchester City host Arsenal on the first evening back.The Premier League champions have not quite relinquished their title yet, but with Liverpool needing just two more wins to secure the trophy, they are fighting a losing battle.Arsenal have a more pressing fight on their hands as they look to keep their slim hopes of a Champions League place alive.The Gunners are down in ninth, but a top five finish may be enough to secure Champions League football if City’s two-year ban from the competition is upheld.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTThis is the first time Mikel Arteta will face his former employers since leaving his post as City assistant manager to take over as Arsenal boss in December.When is Man City vs Arsenal?The game kicks-off at 8pm on Wednesday 17 June at the Etihad.Man City vs Arsenal TV channel and live streamSky Sports Main Event and Sky Sports Premier League will be showing the game live with coverage following Aston Villa vs Sheffield United on the same channels.Sky Sports subscribers can stream the action on Sky Go or the Sky Sports app.Non-subscribers can stream the game by purchasing a NOW TV Sky Sports pass.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityMan City vs Arsenal team newsAfter the three-month break, Manchester City have a clean bill of health for this game, with Leroy Sane available to play for the first time this season.Arsenal are nearly at full strength, with only Calum Chambers out with a long-term knee injury.Man City vs Arsenal odds1/3 Man City9/2 Draw8/1 ArsenalOdds courtesy of Betfair Metro Sport ReporterWednesday 17 Jun 2020 12:45 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link Man City vs Arsenal head-to-head 15 Dec 2019: Arsenal 0-3 Man City – Premier League03 Feb 2019: Man City 3-1 Arsenal – Premier League12 Aug 2018: Arsenal 0-2 Man City – Premier League01 Mar 2018: Arsenal 0-3 Man City – Premier League25 Feb 2018: Arsenal 0-3 Man City – League Cupcenter_img MORE: Raheem Sterling concerned by Mikel Arteta’s inside knowledge ahead of Man City vs ArsenalMORE: ‘I don’t understand that at all!’ – Chris Sutton hits out at Arsenal over Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang’s contract situationFollow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.For more stories like this, check our sport page. Advertisement Commentlast_img read more

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Subsea UK Highlights Subsea Companies’ Role in Offshore Wind

first_imgSubsea UK has highlighted the opportunity for subsea companies to step-up and play their part in helping to meet the world’s renewable energy targets at an event in Aberdeen on Wednesday.Chaired by Neil Gordon, chief executive of Subsea UK, the event welcomed speakers from SIEM Offshore Contractors, Ecosse Subsea Systems, DeepOcean, Highlands and Islands Enterprise and James Fisher Marine Services, to discuss the synergies between the subsea and offshore renewable industries, share lessons learned, and examine the role that offshore renewables will play in the future energy mix.The seminar examined how the industry could work together to simplify existing initiatives; in a bid to increase efficiencies and reduce the cost of installing and maintaining wind farms.Neil Gordon, said: “The recent UK Government CFD (Contract for Difference) auction produced three contracts in offshore wind. This produced a new “strike price” of £57.50 MWh which is half what it was in 2015. By bringing together companies that are already active in the offshore renewables space, it was an opportunity to examine developments that have proven to be a success, while highlighting the challenges and the entry routes into the offshore wind market.”Roy Kirk, area manager for Highlands and Islands Enterprise (HIE) revealed how organisations like HIE, Scottish Enterprise and Business Gateway can help companies overcome some of the barriers by offering free advice on market entry requirements, diversification strategies and supply chain positioning.Alex Gauntt, business development manager of SIEM Offshore Contractors, looked at the development, planning and construction phases of offshore wind and tidal projects. He provided an insight into the inter-array cable installation and post-lay burial activities for the EUR 1.9 billion Veja Mate offshore wind farm project in Germany. The project saw SIEM install 73 composite submarine power cables totaling 97 kilometers in length.Iain Middleton, of Ecosse Subsea focussed on the “Simple, Safe, Robust” ethos that Ecosse applies to its operations and highlighted the company’s SCAR seabed system used on many offshore wind projects in the UK and overseas.“With a significant number of developments launching over the next few years, and with world renowned experience in offshore oil and gas engineering, the UK has the skills and expertise to lead the way. However, to do this, it’s vital we build alliances, strengthen the supply chain and embrace new technologies,” Neil Gordon added.Attendees also heard from John Best, head of sustainable energy at James Fisher and Sons who said that there is a huge window of opportunity for the UK to make its mark in the renewables sector over the next decade. He stressed the powers of collaboration and the skills challenge – the importance of making the industry appealing to youngsters, so they are aware of the pathways into the industry.Jonathan Edwards, business development director of DeepOcean also provided an insight into the recent cable lay for the Nemo Link project that will eventually see the national electricity grids of the UK and Belgium connected via a landmark subsea development.last_img read more

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Yamashita treasure buried in Igbaras village?

first_imgILOILO – An ongoing excavation at aprivate lot in Barangay Pasong, Igbaras town has alarmed residents. “Kontuod nga may ara, kontani damo nga mal-am ang mahambal sina,” he said. Part of the letter read: “This is inresponse to the complaint received by my office regarding the alleged treasurehunting in Barangay Pasong, Igbaras, Iloilo. We have exhausted all possiblemeans to settle the issue by calling for a dialogue with the permitee, NolyLaquihon Bayogos with permit No. CPD-THP-2019-20 dated June 01, 2019 issued bythe National Museum and signed by Angel P. Bautista, acting assistant director,chief, CPRD. However, upon discussion, the permitee refused to suspend theiractivity despite the petition of the barangay officials and residents. Thelocation is said to be at very high risk of landslide and soil erosion as perassessment of the Mines and Geosciences Bureau.” Behind an enclosure surrounding thelot, men are reportedly digging for treasures. Led by Igbaras’ Mayor Jaime Esmeralda,barangay officials of Pasong sought the help of Gov. Arthur Defensor Jr.yesterday. Some residents say the diggers arelooking for the buried gold treasures of World War 2 Japanese general TomoyukiYamashita. Yamashita was assigned to defend theJapan-colonized Philippines from the advancing Allied forces in the waningyears of World War 2. He failed to stop the Allied advance, and Japanultimately surrendered in August 1945. Before his Philippine assignment,Yamashita and his men were said to have plundered other Southeast Asiancountries that Japan attacked and/or invaded during the war and buried the lootin the Philippines. For his part, Barangay CaptainCornelio Elumba of Pasong dismissed speculations there could be Yamashitatreasures buried in his village. According to the mayor, around 10diggers have so far covered 1,000 square meters.center_img But what worries residents are thepossible adverse effects of the excavation on their village such as landslide,soil erosion and the earth caving in. As far as the municipal government ofIgbaras and barangay council of Pasong were concerned, said Esmeralda, they havenot issued any permit for treasure hunting, ground excavation or mining in thevillage. “I learned that the excavation hasbeen going on for about one and half years already beginning in 2018 before Iwas elected mayor. Residents fear this could result to soil erosion. Ninenearby households are very concerned,” said Esmeralda. According to Esmeralda, he had also writtenNational Museum of the Philippines’s head Jeremy Barns seeking informationabout the so-called permit issued to Bayogos. According to Esmeralda, the municipalpolice was also tasked to investigate but the cops were turned away and toldthat only President Rodrigo Duterte could stop the excavation. Defensor vowed to help verify theIgbaras digging at the National Museum of the Philippines. From what he had gathered, saidEsmeralda, a certain Noly Laquihon Bayogos claimed to have secured a “TreasureHunting and Disposition of Recovered Treasures Permit” from the National Museumof the Philippines purportedly signed by Angel Bautista, acting assistantdirector, chief, Cultural Properties Regulation Division of the museum. Themayor wanted this verified. He also alerted the Provincial LegalOffice and Provincial Environment and Natural Resources./PNlast_img read more

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Clifford O. Niese

first_imgClifford O. Niese, age 73 of Batesville, died Wednesday, November 21, 2018 at the St. Andrews Health Campus.  Born February 27, 1945 in Batesville, he is the son of Pauline (Nee: Koetter) and Louis Niese.  He married Elizabeth White June 26, 1971 at St. Joseph’s Church in Florence, Alabama.  Cliff worked at the Hill-Rom Company 39 years before retiring in 2009 and was a member of St. Louis Church and the Knights of St. John Commandry #243.Family was important to Cliff.  He always loved having his family around and enjoyed traveling to visit family and friends.  He liked old tractors, antiques, swimming and fishing.  According to his family, he was a fan of Colts, Reds, I.U. basketball and had a weakness for black licorice.  Having lost his eyesight, the one thing he didn’t like was being told “no”.Cliff is survived by his wife Elizabeth; daughter Deborah Garbarini; sons Kevin and Keith Niese, all of Batesville; his mother Pauline of Batesville; sisters Pat Schrank of Oldenburg, Viola Billman of Sunman, Lucille Honnert of St. Mary’s; brothers Virgil and Dale Niese, both of Batesville, Jim Niese of St. Peter’s and seven grandchildren.  In addition to his father, he is also preceded in death by his sister Ann Montag.Visitation is Monday, November 26th, from 4 – 7 p.m. at the Weigel Funeral Home.  Funeral services are 10 a.m. Tuesday, November 27th at St. Louis Church with Rev. Stan Pondo officiating.  Burial will follow in the church cemetery.  The family requests memorials to the Indiana School for the Blind or the St. Louis Cemetery Fund.last_img read more

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