Get a Glimpse of the Glamour Cat! Nicole Scherzinger in London’s Cats

first_imgFirst she was a Pussycat Doll—now she’s the Glamour Cat! Nicole Scherzinger is prowling to the West End in the new revival of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Cats. UK’s Daily Mail released some sizzling photos of the new star sporting a short, sleek Grizabella wig, a chic fur coat and fur-covered fingerless gloves. Ready to see the new revival? Catch the limited engagement of Cats from December 6 through February 28, 2015 at the London Palladium, with opening night scheduled for December 11. Meow! View Commentslast_img

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Computers in Farming

first_imgIf a farmer ever needed a reason to buy a computer for the farm, he’ll get it at AgShowcase ’96. Practical uses, networks and gee-whiz ideas will show off the technologychanging the future of farming.The Showcase is Saturday, June 29, at the Rural Development Center in Tifton. It startsat 9 a.m. and ends at 4 p.m. And it features the latest from Georgia agriculturalcolleges.The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences cosponsorsthe showcase with Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College and Fort Valley State College.The event showcases the work of Georgia Extension Service specialists and agents andGeorgia Agricultural Experiment Station researchers. It brings academic and researchadvances to the heart of Georgia farming.Many displays will use computers to explain their messages. One will show how programspredict crop yields. Others will detail software that supports farmers.Two new CDs will be on display. One includes 200 full-color pictures of forest insectsand damage. The other is the Extension Service’s ‘Pest Control Handbook.'”We’ll showhow to get the Extension CDs and use them,” said Don Hamilton, an Extension Service computer specialist.Hamilton will show how farmers can use the World Wide Web, too. He’ll show how they can findthe Extension Service Web page.”Our World Wide Web site has been accessed 50,000 timessince last June,”Hamilton said. “It’s averaging around 4,500 times a week.”The site has farm publications and news stories, names and phone numbers of countyagents and specialists, and much more.Ever see a GSAMS classroom? You can at the showcase. The (Georgia Statewide Academicand Medical System) classroom offers two-way voice and video links among up to sevensites.”This technology carries graphics, charts, photos andvideo,” said Bob Molleur, an Extension Service visual communications specialist.”It’s a wayof teaching in several remote sites at once.”GSAMS has 300 such classrooms in schools, libraries and state agencies. It has 59 inhospitals linked to the Medical College of Georgia. In the first three months this year,GSAMS carried 325 conferences in 900 sites.last_img read more

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Ag Forecast 2008

first_imgUniversity of GeorgiaAnyone who wants the latest information about crop prices, pending U.S. farm and energy policies, weather forecasts or water conservation should attend at least one of the five meetings planned across Georgia the week of Jan. 28.The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences will host its second annual Ag Forecast Breakfast Series 7 a.m. -10 a.m. Jan. 28 in Rome, Jan. 29 in Gainesville, Jan. 30 in Statesboro, Jan. 31 in Tifton and Feb. 1 in Macon. Participants will hear from farm experts and get to ask them questions. They’ll receive the 2008 Agricultural Price and Profit Planning Book, a detailed analysis of each major Georgia product, and get breakfast, too.Co-sponsors are Georgia Farm Bureau, Georgia Department of Agriculture and the Georgia Agribusiness Council. Registration costs $35 per person or $250 for a table of eight. For more information or to register, call (706) 542-2434 or visit the Web site www.GeorgiaAgForecast.com.last_img read more

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To the top

first_imgBy Stephanie Schupska University of Georgia From bicycle-powered light bulbs to algae bubbling in plastic bags, 30 universities showed off their biofuels research under a circus-size tent at the second annual Bioenergy Awareness Days in Washington June 19.The three-day event took place at both the Whitten Federal Building of the U.S. Department of Agriculture and at the National Arboretum. Close to 80 exhibitors were featured. The University of Georgia is among 13 winners of the Grand Challenge, an honor that allowed them to exhibit at both locations. The title recognizes universities for their leadership in renewable energy research, teaching and outreach and for their collaborations with other private or public institutions.“The Grand Challenge was looking and challenging universities to work with other universities and industries and other institutions to develop a vision on how to meet the energy concern in the next few years,” said Gale Buchanan, USDA under secretary for research, education and economics and former dean of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. The USDA and the 25x’25 Alliance sponsored the challenge. 25x’25 is a coalition of leaders from agricultural, forestry and renewable energy communities. They are committed to providing 25 percent of the nation’s energy from farms and forests by 2025. The exhibit dates were chosen for their proximity to the summer solstice on June 21, the longest day of the year. Researchers from UGA’s Athens and Tifton campuses hauled algae, chicken fat, wood pellets, a remote-controlled tractor and sugar cane through Georgia, the Carolinas, Virginia, D.C. and finally Maryland to participate in the event at the National Arboretum. For three days they faced cameras and fielded questions like, “Chicken fat? Really?” Mention algae and chicken fat together, and visitors, reporters and dignitaries alike headed eagerly toward UGA’s lab-like display, which was set up in a walk-through trailer. K.C. Das, a CAES associate professor and director of UGA’s Biorefining and Carbon Cycling Program, estimates algae will be commercially viable as a source for biofuel in about five years. Algae have the potential for producing 2,000 gallons of oil per acre annually. In comparison, soybeans produce 48 gallons an acre. Corn produces 18 gallons an acre. Much of the research UGA displayed is already being put to commercial use. In north Georgia chicken fat is manufactured as biodiesel. Pellets made from both peanut hulls and Georgia’s timber scraps are being burned for fuel. The UGA remote-controlled “sipping” tractor runs on both ethanol and solar power and earns its name by sipping just enough fuel to keep going. And sugar cane is just one of many crops UGA researchers are putting through the grind in search of better biomass. More than 80 researchers and economists are working on basic and applied biofuels research, collaborating through UGA’s Biofuels, Biopower and Biomaterials Initiative (B3I). From rotten fruit to cotton stalks, they’re searching for the second generation of biofuels that will produce energy without eating up valuable food crops.(Stephanie Schupska is a news editor with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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Stuttgart special report

first_imgINTRO: We present a selection of the numerous new products for the rail industry on show at the UITP’s City Transport 97 exhibition in Stuttgart last monthLess wheel squealTRACK component specialist Ortec has developed a number of new products designed to help railways in their efforts to cut wheel-rail noise. Resilient rail surrounds for urban applications include Germany’s Wuppertaler Schwebebahn, but the company says that the vibration-inhibiting design can be adapted for steel bridges on conventional railways.Of special interest to urban operators who have sharp curves is the ’Golden Silence’ concept which is intended to reduce or eliminate wheel squeal. The rail is treated on the head and gauge face with an aluminium-bronze coating that can be applied without raising the rail temperature above 50°C and which has no effect on the rail’s structure. It can be applied to rails that are already in situ.A product for use with German B70 sleepers consists of rubber inserts that sit in plastic holders next to and below the rail; the size of the inserts can be varied according to the application.Ortec, Nümbrecht, GermanyReader Enquiry Number 143Door developmentsVISITORS to the Faiveley stand at Stuttgart were able to see demonstrations of two types of sliding-plug door. One was a lightweight design with full-depth glazing in aluminium panels for light rail and tram applications. Thanks to a telescopic support, the operating mechanism is mounted entirely on a bar above the door, requiring just two fixings to the car body. The second design (right) is that chosen for the Juniper family of trains being built in Britain by GEC Alsthom. The same design is being fitted to Stockholm’s T2000 cars, German Railway’s ’Lint’ light regional railcars under construction by Linke-Hofmann-Busch, and SNCF’s TER2N regional double-deck trainsets.Faiveley Transport, Saint-Denis, France Reader Enquiry Number 144Refitting RATP ticket countersSchlumberger has begun work on a contract to re-equip 900 booking office ticket counters for Paris Transport Authority. Following development of prototypes by Dassault and another company, Schlumberger is to supply equipment that will allow carnets of 10 Edmondson style tickets to be issued in 8sec.Design of the counter (above) and open architecture computer equipment was carried out in close co-operation with the trades unions to ensure good ergonomics. At the busiest locations in central Paris up to 3000 transactions a day are expected from a single counter. First installation will be in 1998, with all units on site by 2000. Schlumberger plans to install and refit each counter in a single night shift.Another Schlumberger contract is to supply 150 ticket vending machines for French National Railways to be installed in time for the 1998 World Cup championship. Using the same type of customer interface as bank cash machines with select buttons to right and left of an LCD screen, the equipment can issue a ticket in less than 15sec. Payment is by bank card, coins or electronic purse.The company has developed a prototype hand-held ticket issuing and reservations machine for use by on-train staff. Called the Watson (right), it uses an electronic pen for data input.Schlumberger, Montrouge, FranceReader Enquiry Number 145Ticket issueSECURITY was a prime consideration in the design of Dassault’s TVM200 wall-mounted ticket machine for Paris Transport Authority. The first of 150 machines was installed a few weeks ago under a contract shared by Dassault and Monétel.Intended to be able to resist attack by vandals or thieves armed with hand tools for 20min, the TVM200 includes features such as a hard wall immediately behind the touch screen that prevents further access to the interior if the screen is smashed. Maintenance and servicing staff have access by electronic codes only to those parts of the machine which they require.Destinations and ticket types are selected using a roller bar below the screen, and passengers accept the displayed data by pressing a single button. Payment is by conventional bank cards or smartcards, which can be recharged in the machine. Contactless smartcards can also be used.Dassault, Paris, FranceReader Enquiry Number 146Railcar drivesTransmission specialist Voith is supplying T312br converter coupling hydrodynamic transmissions for German Railway’s VT612 diesel trainsets, which are to be fitted with Cummins engines. The T312br features a retarder device and electronic controls and is similar to the equipment fitted to DB’s Class VT611 units, the first of which have re-entered commercial service after numerous technical problems.Voith also holds a letter of intent from Linke-Hofmann-Busch to supply transmissions to 30 Class VT640 vehicles. The VT641 railcars jointly ordered for SNCF and DB railcars will also have Voith drives with electronic controls.Voith, Heidenheim/Brenz, GermanyReader Enquiry Number 147last_img read more

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APG reverses offshore-windpower policy after new risk assessment

first_imgThe €396bn asset manager APG has said it is now ready to invest in offshore windfarms after overcoming initial reservations about the risks involved.After considering new data – in part provided by energy companies – it said it was able to make a risk assessment that met its investment criteria. In addition, last year’s Energy Agreement assured APG that the government’s subsidy rules for investments in offshore windpower would remain in place, according to spokesman Harmen Geers.As part of the accord – brokered by the Social and Economic Council (SER) – the Dutch government has committed itself to subsidising 3,450 megawatts of offshore windpower for the 2015-19 period. APG’s announcement that it was ready to invest in local windfarm Borssele I coincided with the presentation of a petition urging the asset manager to divest its stakes in coal, shale gas and tar sands within two years.The petition was signed by 10,000 participants of the €344bn civil service scheme ABP, APG’s largest client, and was presented to José Meijer, ABP’s vice-chair, by the ABPfossil-free organisation. Currently, ABP has a €30bn stake in energy and energy infrastructure, and €1bn invested in sustainable energy, including onshore windfarms. Geers said ABP wanted to double its share in renewable energy to €2bn.“However, finding the right investments is not easy, as the investment must be at least €100m, and our investment criteria prevent us from owning more than 50% of any project,” he said.He that investments must also match APG’s risk/return criteria.That said, APG’s participation in the planned windfarm Borssele I would in part be subject to the outcome of a survey into the expected interaction with a Belgian windfarm nearby, Geers said.According to the spokesman, the project is expected to be tendered at the end of this year, and APG intends to join one of the subscribing consortia.Geers added that APG also supported a sustainable climate policy, but one enacted through gradual changes.“Divesting all our stakes in coal within two years, for example, is too sudden,” he said.“And what is more, as an investor, we wouldn’t be able to engage with those companies about their policies any longer.”last_img read more

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Dutch should adopt principles-based funding framework: Aon Hewitt

first_imgA principles-based approach ought to replace the tight rules of the financial assessment framework in the Netherlands in order to create scope for innovation for a new pensions system, consultancy Aon Hewitt has argued.Speaking at a conference in Amsterdam last week, Frank Driessen, chief executive of Aon Hewitt Netherlands, contended that a one-size-fits-all system would not be the solution for the current multi-cultural society.An approach similar to that taken by the EU’s pension fund legislation, IORP II, would allow innovation for a new system, he said. In his opinion, a principles-based assessment framework would offer more potential to modernise defined contribution arrangements, such as lifecycle investments based on participants’ risk profile. Driessen’s vision of a new pensions system included the introduction of individual pensions accrual combined with collective investing – as is still being assessed by the Social and Economic Council – with participants choosing their risk profile.The consultancy’s CEO also argued in favour of employers being enabled to select their pensions provider rather than the current mandatory participation in sector pension funds.He said he was also in favour of allowing pension funds to pick their specific pensions contract.A “hard stop” for the old pension arrangements would be crucial for a transfer to a new pension contract in the Netherlands, Driessen also argued.  This would avoid discussions about who would fit the bill and problems in merging existing pension rights accrued under the current arrangements with new pensions accrual under a new pensions contract.  Driessen also warned that, after 10 years of what he said were fruitless discussions about a new pensions system, the risk was real that “emotions in society” could force pension funds to respond in some way.“We don’t want to end up in such a position,” he said.The Dutch government wants to introduce a new pension model in 2020, but many in the industry doubt this is achievable.last_img read more

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Grenada individual investor program shelved

first_img Sharing is caring! 33 Views   no discussions NewsRegional Grenada individual investor program shelved by: – March 6, 2012 Share Tweetcenter_img Share ST GEORGE’S, Grenada — Just days before the presentation of the 2012 budget, ministry of finance officials in Grenada are being forced to revisit their projected sources of revenue for planned programs and projects of government.The country was expecting to generate millions of dollars under an initiative called Grenada Individual Investor Program (GIIP).Finance Minister Nazim Burke.However, according to a finance ministry source, GIIP has been put on hold for the moment. “Our information is that the idea did not receive the approval of a majority of cabinet members who recently met to discuss the program,” said the source, who spoke on condition of anonymity.It is believed that many government ministers, as well as longtime supporters of the ruling National Democratic Congress (NDC), fear backlash from the implementation of GIIP, which is reminiscent of the “passport selling” Economic Citizenship program of the former New National Party (NNP) administration.The NNP program, which allowed successful applicants to secure Grenadian passports, may have contributed to the party’s 2008 general election defeat, and led to Canada’s inclusion of Grenadians on a list of foreign nationals who now require visas to enter that country.In a series of media appearances in late February, Finance Minister Nazim Burke acknowledged that there is likely to be “a lot of national anxieties” about GIIP because of the failed economic citizenship program of the NNP.But he was confident that GIIP, once approved by government, could “bring substantial benefits to Grenada if it is well designed; if it is properly managed; if it is well implemented.”Burke said GIIP “provides an opportunity to expand the national economy; to increase the revenue base for the country; to increase employment generation; and is an additional source of foreign exchange for Grenada.”The 2012 budget, which was rescheduled from its expected January presentation, will be delivered on Friday by Burke, who is also minister of planning, economic development, cooperatives and energy.The country is facing a budget deficit estimated to be about EC$100 million. Caribbean News Now Sharelast_img read more

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Blue-liner quietly continues to shine in senior season

first_imgMEGHAN CONLIN/Herald Photo”Offense sells crowds, but defense wins games,” Badger defenseman Joe Piskula said, mimicking the commonly heard sports axiom. This season the Badgers have managed to fill the stands with their offense (3.48 goals per game), something that has come as a bit of a novelty in the Mike Eaves coaching era.As always, though, Wisconsin has continued to win its games with stellar defense, starting at the top with senior blue-liner Tom Gilbert.Gilbert’s emergence last year as one of the league’s top defensemen gave the gritty Badger defense a face. Even now, followers can easily spot when the senior is on the ice by the long locks protruding from underneath his helmet. More than that, they can recognize the controlled ferocity with which he plays.”He’s such a competitor,” assistant coach Mark Osiecki said. “He is probably one of the most, if not the most, competitive guys on our team.”That spirited play put Gilbert on the map last season, when coaches gave him more responsibility due to a large amount of underclassmen defensemen and the loss of Ryan Suter, who left the team to pursue a career in the NHL. Gilbert helped the team hold opponents to 2.2 goals per game for the season.”Something happened in the second half of last year where he was given more responsibility, it was a necessity thing, and he just blossomed,” Eaves said. “Then his confidence grew, and he’s continued to play that way.”Gilbert has gone nowhere but up since that time. This season, as his team climbed the ranks to No. 1 in the country, Gilbert led a defense that at one time was ranked first in the country. He also emerged as one of the top scoring defensemen in the WCHA, as he currently ranks second in defensemen scoring in the WCHA with 18 points.While his feats on the ice continue to rack up, his status in the media has been put in neutral. Although he was the face of last year’s stingy defense, this year the media has focused on the play of goaltender Brian Elliott.It is hard to ignore a netminder that is leading the country in every viable goaltending statistic, but it’s also hard to ignore a 6-foot-3 defenseman who creates the outer wall around the net. “A lot of people look at us as a one-player team, and that’s Brian Elliott,” Osiecki said. “Obviously, he’s done very well, but I think it does steal a little bit away from how gifted Tom Gilbert is.”Whatever the attention level, the assistant captain has continued to go about his job and has done it better than almost anyone at his position. He and defensive partner Piskula have anchored the best team defense in the WCHA, with the Badgers allowing only 1.83 goals per game this season.The pair have also become paramount to the team’s offensive success, as evidenced by plus / minus ratings of +23 for Gilbert and +24 for Piskula — by far the two highest ratings on the team. Not only are teams not scoring when those two are on the ice, but the Badgers also become more effective on offense.”He’s a very good offensive defenseman,” Piskula said of his defensive partner. “He knows when to jump in the rush and when to find that line in the offensive zone. It’s good to watch him and see the stuff he does.”Piskula has watched, and he has learned. He has scored 11 points of his own this season, a personal best and significant improvement from last season’s total of six points. Most of that learning has been done by observing the way Gilbert plays.”He’s more of a leader by example,” Piskula said. “He tries to do everything to a tee and just lead that way.”Gilbert’s effectiveness on offense can be attributed to his expanded role. He is the quarterback on one of the team’s power play formations, and he often times acts as a fourth offensive player when the Badgers are on the attack. His increased role has led to a career-high 22 points this season.When Gilbert is not helping his team score, he is doing the little things that help his team win. He cuts off shooting lanes, blocks shots with the best of them and he makes very few mistakes.What the future holds for the rangy defender nobody knows. The Edmonton Oilers hold rights to Gilbert when he turns professional after they traded Tommy Salo and their 2005 sixth-round draft pick to get him from the Colorado Avalanche. His coaches believe his career won’t end in college.”I think he’ll play,” Osiecki said of Gilbert’s chances in the NHL. “He’s going to have a chance to play, and once he gets his chance, he’s going to stay and play very well.”For now, though, Gilbert will continue blocking shots for Wisconsin. The NHL will have to wait.last_img read more

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Hoosiers rebounding prowess concern for Badgers

first_imgWhile Taylor Wurtz paces the Badgers, sophomore Morgan Paige will need to score if the team hopes to have a consistent offensive output in both halves.[/media-credit]It’s been a rough stretch of games for the Wisconsin women’s basketball team.Losers of five straight and struggling with consistency, the Badgers (8-18, 4-10) will find themselves paired with another struggling team Thursday night as they take on the Indiana Hoosiers (5-22, 0-14) in Bloomington, Ind.Despite their winless conference record and current 14-game losing streak, the Hoosiers have battled opponents like Illinois, Michigan and Northwestern down to the wire.While the Hoosiers look like the doormat of the conference record wise, the team has a surprising amount of competitiveness. Indiana is currently the Big Ten’s third best rebounding team, averaging 42 rebounds a game despite losing their best rebounder, senior double-double threat Georgie Jones, to a season-ending ACL tear.This could pose a danger to Wisconsin, a team that has struggled to contain and box out opponents on the boards throughout the season.“If I’m [Indiana] and I’m looking at tape and seeing that in certain games we’ve given up 21 and 23 offensive rebounds, I’d say ‘Hey, last game at home, everybody rebounds,’” Wisconsin head coach Bobbie Kelsey said. “I’d be saying they aren’t going to box you out because we haven’t proven we can. Until you prove it, why would they not attack us”?Besides being outrebounded in every game during their five-game losing streak, the Badgers have given up a combined 69 offensive rebounds in that span, good for an average of almost 14 a game.It’s no mystery that the Badgers fate against the Hoosiers will be tied to the battle of the boards.“They’re a good rebounding team, they don’t have just a good rebounder, they have a good rebounding team,” senior forward Anya Covington said. “So we all have to box out, and we’ve been lacking in that area. It all comes down to discipline, but I know we can do that and box out.”The Badgers will also need consistent offensive production from their guards. While junior guard Taylor Wurtz’s offensive dominance has been well documented, the rest of the conference has caught on. Opponents’ best defenders have flustered Wurtz or double-teamed the star guard in the second half of the conference season, leading to Wisconsin’s struggles in maintaining a consistent scoring output.If the Badgers want to play the spoilers on the Hoosiers’ Senior Night at Assembly Hall, guards like Morgan Paige will have to step up like she did Sunday against Nebraska. Leading the team with 15 points in a losing effort, Paige showed her ability to do it all for Wisconsin, scoring on jump shots as well as on the drive.“My percentage is really high, and the scouting report for other teams probably says contest hard and make her put the ball on the ground,” Paige said. “I think as soon as I hit an outside shot, they came out harder on me. My favorite thing is to put the ball on the ground. I love to use pump-fakes, so when I get to go straight line to the basket for wide-open layups it’s always a great opportunity for us.”The Badgers will need everything Paige can muster Thursday night, as the matchup against the Hoosiers will feature the two worst scoring offenses in the Big Ten. While the Badgers have shown glimpses of offensive greatness against the conference – highlighted by a 79 point outburst against Iowa on Feb. 2 – the Badgers have only mustered on average 59.2 points per game this season.For Kelsey, the Badgers just need someone to step up during crunch time to help give the team some consistency on the offensive end.“This is not a group that’s used to having close games,” Kelsey said. “None of them have had to do that in their careers here. They’ve never been put in those situations where someone has to be the closer.“I mean, who is that? We have a hard time sometimes, identifying one. Taylor can close, but when she gets double-teamed who else? … It’s hard to not have that veteran experience of someone that’s been in that situation before.”last_img read more

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