Work hoarse?

first_img Comments are closed. Work hoarse?On 1 Aug 2001 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. More and more people use their voice at work whether in a call centre or aclassroom.  This presents a challenge theOH team which needs to help workers develop strategies to look after theirvocal health.  By Carey Gardner In modern societies about one third of the labour force works in professionsin which the voice is the primary tool. And this number is in- creasing withthe development of new employment arenas such as telephone banking and callcentres. Recent research has suggested that teachers, trainers and instructorscomprise a large proportion of the population who seek help and therapy forvoice disorders. Although voice problems are common, they are most common inprofessions where there is a heavy vocal loading, for example, prolonged voiceuse, long speaking distances and in the presence of background noise1. Smith et al2 found that schoolteachers report voice problems at a rate ofnearly three times that of a randomly selected group of individuals who workedin a variety of other occupations2. The voice is the primary instrument of communication for humans bothsocially and in the workplace. Although rarely life-threatening, voice problemscan have a tremendous impact on daily life3. According to Perkins, because the human voice is a powerful indicator of anindividual’s physical and emotional health, personality, identity and aestheticorientation as well as an acoustic signal for speech, singing, drama andemotional expression, voice disorders may exert a profound effect on affectedindividuals4. Voice disorders can result from many causes including disease processes, congenitalabnormalities, faulty use of the vocal mechanism, and psychogenic causes. Themajority of voice disorders are due to the latter two factors, that isfunctional rather than organic causes5. Koufman6 suggests that the voice in actuality is the entire person, sinceany abnormality of the psyche or soma can give rise to an abnormality of thevoice. Therefore, the voice is a measure of a person’s overall sense ofwell-being. He also claims that traditional medicine has created a dichotomousmodel of disease – organic versus functional – but many voice disorders can beboth organic and functional simultaneously. However, this dichotomy has littlerelevance to understanding the management of voice disorders. The causes of voice change Voice changes appear to be associated with vocalisations that occur overlong periods of time, at a high volume, at an unusual pitch, with excessive orinappropriate tension, in the presence of unhealthy vocal fold tissue or due toa combination of these factors7. Over the past 10 years there have been several studies that have sought toidentify the nature, frequency and risk factors that contribute to voicesymptoms experienced by teachers. However, research is important in identifyingrisk factors for any profession where there is a heavy vocal loading andenvironmental risk factors. A survey by Sapir et al8, which was designed to assess the prevalence andimpact of voice loss, suggested that it was prevalent among teachers. More thanhalf of teachers suffered more than three voice symptoms, and these symptomsadversely affected their ability to teach effectively. Teachers also felt thattheir voice was a chronic source of frustration or stress to them8. In research by Smith et al2 teachers complained that teaching had an adverseimpact on their voices, and 39 per cent had cut down on their teachingactivities as a result. Further research on teachers in comparison to individuals working in otheroccupations, suggested that teachers are at a high risk for disability fromvoice disorders and that this health problem may have significant work-relatedand economic effects: 20 per cent of teachers but only 4 per cent ofnon-teachers had missed work due to voice problems2. A group of aerobics instructors were studied by Long et al9. Results showedthat a significant number of instructors experienced partial or complete voiceloss during and after instruction, as well as increased episodes of hoarsenessand sore throats unrelated to illness. Several studies indicate teaching produces a high risk of voice symptoms,and that the problem is related to vocally abusive behaviours associated withthe occupation. This health problem may have significant work-related andeconomic effects on the affected individual. The working environment Individuals who use their speaking voice as the main instrument of theirprofession are often required to speak for prolonged periods where optimalvoice quality and projection is demanded, in environments which are notconducive, and where they are required to place exceptional and continualdemands on their voices in stressful circumstances. Noise Background noise can be significant in the development of vocal symptoms.Individuals will increase the volume of their voice in noisy situations inorder to be heard. Therefore, vocal intensity and the consequential strainincrease proportionately in order to communicate effectively in noisyenvironments10. Humidity and temperature A hot dry environment can be detrimental to the voice and humidification maybe required, especially during the winter. Dehydration should be avoided sincethis can affect the vocal process and it is important to have access todrinking water to lubricate the vocal system. Pace of work and job content Prolonged periods of using the voice can contribute to vocal fatigue. Notall vocal demands are of equal importance. Therefore a schedule of work thatleaves room for voice rest and recovery should be developed. If workers are suffering vocal problems and throat symptoms due to thenature of their work this has important implications from an occupationalhealth point of view since employers have responsibilities under legislationsuch as the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and the Management of Health andSafety at Work Regulations 1992. This legislation requires employers to carryout systematic health and safety inspections of their premises and practicesand to identify any risks or hazards to their workers arising from thosepremises or practices. Employers are then required to take action to eliminatethe risks and hazards to health identified, or reduce them as far as is reasonablypracticable. Remedial action could apply to environmental considerations such as roomacoustics, speaking duration, distance, humidity and noise levels. Combined with remedial environmental changes, where required, and areduction in risk factors associated with vocal abuse and overuse, thedevelopment of health education programmes focusing on the voice may help to preventthe development of voice symptoms. Education would increase awareness of the factors that affect voice health,and encourage workers to become more attentive to the risk factors that lead tovocal fatigue and discomfort. Chan has detailed a programme of vocal hygiene education. This programmeincludes: – Education on the anatomy and physiology of the vocal system – Explanation of vocal abuses, talking loudly, forced whispering, forexample – Lifestyle behaviours that can affect voice health – smoking, caffeine, andalcohol, for instance – Education on healthy vocal use including strategies to maintain order, bynon-vocal signals such as clapping, which aims to conserve the voice – Moving closer to the target audience to alleviate the need for strenuousvocal effort11. The impact of a voice disorder on an individual is considered immeasurable,and the resulting symptoms such as vocal fatigue, hoarseness, voice loss anddiscomfort of the throat, can affect a worker’s ability to function andtherefore may have significant work-related and economic effects. Voice dysfunction can lead to increased sickness absence, reduced effectivenessand may in severe circum- stances, lead to the individual leaving employment. Clear evidence is emerging from a number of recent studies for developmentof strategies and educational programmes for the maintenance of voice health. The voice is the primary instrument of one-third of the labour force and assuch every effort should be made to protect it. References1. Vilkman E (2000) Voice problems at work: a challenge for occupationalsafety and health arrangement. Folia Phoniatr Logop 52(1-3):120. 2. Smith E, Lemke J, Taylor M, Kirchner HL, Hoffman H (1998) Frequency ofvoice problems among teachers and other occupations. Journal Voice, 2(4):480-8.3. Garrett.CG, Ossoff RH (1999) Hoarseness. Medical Clinics of NorthAmerica, 83 (1):115-123. 4. Perkins WH (1971) Vocal function: a behavioural analysis. In:Travis LE,ed. Handbook of speech, pathology and audiology. New York: Appleton-CenturyCrofts. 5. Herrington-Hall BL, Lee L, Stemple JC, Niemi KR, McHone M (1988)Description of laryngeal pathologies by age, sex and occupation in a treatmentseeking sample. .Journal of Speech & Hearing Disorders, 53:57-64. 6.Koufman, James A. Medicine in the vocal arts. Center for Voice Disordersof Wake Forest University. http://www.bgsm.edu/voice/medicine_vocal_arts.html 7. Gotaas C, Starr CD (1993) Vocal fatigue among teachers. Folia Phoniatr(Basel), 45(3):120-1. 8. Sapir S, Keidar A, Mathers-Schmidt B (1993) Vocal attrition in teachers: surveyfindings.European Journal of Disorders of Communication, 28 (2): 177. 9. Long J, Williford HN, Olson MS, Wolfe. (1998) Voice problems and riskfactors among aerobics instructors. Journal Voice, 12(2):197-207. 10. Rontal E, Rontal M, Jacob HJ, Rolnick MI (1979) Vocal cord dysfunction –an industrial health hazard. Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol,88(pt 1):818-21. 11. Chan RW (1994) Does the voice improve with vocal hygiene education? Astudy of some instrumental voice measures in a group of kindergarten teachers.Journal Voice, 8(3):279-91. Carey Gardner RGN, BA(hons), BSc OHN (Bristol) Specialist NursePractitioner is a health adviser for Bupa Wellness (Cardiff) The manifestation of voice disordersVocal fatigue a problem that begins to occur as the speaking dayprogresses and which worsens during the dayLaryngeal fatigue affects the physical sensations and effort andperceptual quality of voice productionHoarseness a term used to describe a change in a person’s normalvoice quality or change in normal pitch, vocal abuse is one of the most commoncauses of hoarseness and can lead to other vocal pathologies such as vocalnodulesAphonia loss of voiceOdynophonia pain and soreness in the throat with prolonged vocal useVoice break or voce “crack”A loss of pitch range Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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Racial diversity is a business problem

first_img Comments are closed. HR can help in the CRE’s drive for racial equality by promoting it to the boardas a business necessity. We learn how Trevor Phillips, the organisation’s newchief, plans to target the private sector as a priority, by Paul NelsonThe new head of the Commission for Racial Equality (CRE) realises howpowerful an image can be. When Personnel Today met Trevor Phillips, ex-television journalist andproducer, he was adamant that he wouldn’t pose for photos in front of the CRE’sblack and white holding hands logo. It is “too simplistic”, he said,before vowing to scrap it and replace it with an emblem that better sums up thechallenge for racial harmony in multi-cultural Britain. Phillips is certainly keen to advance the CRE’s cause. He plans to targetthe private sector for a serious improvement in race relations, because theyare not directly covered by race legislation. He also wants HR to makediversity mainstream by selling it to their boards as a way of increasingprofits. Phillips believes HR directors must run with the ball – selling diversity totheir firms as a business benefit, and not simply as a way to tackle a socialproblem. He feels that HR directors currently believe diversity is ‘dumped’ onthem, and the only way they will get support from other areas of the firm is topromote it as a business necessity. “HR directors aren’t Martin Luther King, they are hired to make theirorganisations work. We need to move out of the missionary position to one wherepeople think about the business,” Phillips said. “Some HR directors have taken a different approach and are aggressivein treating diversity as a business problem and not a social one. Wherecompanies state they are doing it [diversity] to hit targets so everyone has ajob next year, people will join in.” Phillips believes this is the only approach that will make business leaderscommit to mainstreaming diversity in firms. “The chief executive is brimming with racial niceness and says to theHR director, ‘Make us an inter-racial paradise’. And the poor HR director hasto report back to the chairman, and if they have not made it wonderful, thenthey have failed,” Phillips said. “A lot of HR directors feel ratherdumped on.” Phillips believes the private sector is “afraid of the CRE”, andadmits it doesn’t work closely enough with private companies. However, hewarns, he will not shy away from instigating formal investigations if they donot change their attitudes. He told Personnel Today that all private sector firms delivering publicservices must comply with the Race Relations Amendment Act (RRAA), which forcespublic bodies to actively promote racial equality. Employers must also publishannual reports charting progress and action plans in this area. He said the Government’s policy of encouraging private organisations to fundthe modern-isation of the public sector has led to an ever increasing number ofprivate firms delivering public services, creating a grey area in the law. “Even if the law [RRAA] does not specifically cover private sectorcompanies, we think it essentially captures private sector companies that workfor the public sector. I am going to operate as if it does,” Phillipssaid. “Why should public money be spent in a way that is racially biased? Icannot accept that. Everyone involved in a public-private partnership and acontract that provides services to the public sector – both morally and legally– will have to observe the public duty.” He admits the CRE must change its ways if a new, closer working relationshipis to be successful. “They [the private sector] are asking us how they cando it [improve racial diversity in the work-place] and that is the challenge wehave not quite risen to yet.” Phillips backs recommendations in a recent Government report, which calledon the CRE to ‘name and shame’ racist employers by making greater use of itsinvestigatory powers to put the spotlight on firms with bad equality practices– although he said he will give employers every opportunity to improve beforeusing the full force of the law that he has at his disposal. “There will be a considerable effort in tackling the image the privatesector has of us as a ‘heavy handed copper’,” he said. “I wouldrather the CRE is viewed as a friendly GP, who will give all the medicine andadvice to help an organisation to get healthy. But if a firm is going to disobey,then we will administer the nasty medicine or have it put into hospital. I ampretty straight with people, we will instigate formal investigations.” He also backs the Government’s move to merge the six equalities bodies(SEB), which include the CRE, the equal opportunities commission, thedisability rights commission and the Employers Forum on Age. He believes itwill give them more respect and influence over mainstream diversity issues. Phillips feels that because the individual specialist bodies look afterdifferent equalities areas, they are “marginalised”, viewed as an”add on” and done as “a favour”. He cites the instance ofone body overseeing the case of a black woman working in the City earning lessthan her white male colleagues as an example of how the new system can work inpractice. He wants the merged body to share core functions, including communication,management, estate and property. But he wants to ensure that existing expertisein specialist areas remain. Phillips is also promising to radically overhaul the racial diversity of hisown senior team by introducing more white commissions, as he fears the CRE isregarded as a place where “black people get together to whinge.” www.cre.gov.ukTrevor Phillips’ CV– 2003 – Chair, CRE – 2002 – Deputy chairman, GLA– 2001 – Chairman, GLA– 2000 – Member of the Greater London Authority– 1993 – Deputy general secretary, TUC– 1981 – Television journalist/producer (including head ofLWT’s current affairs 1992-1994)– 1980 Researcher, London Weekend Television Racial diversity is a business problemOn 29 Apr 2003 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Britain’s most powerful women

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Britain’s most powerful womenOn 2 Jul 2004 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Thetop 10 1.         Marjorie Scardino, the only chiefexecutive of a FTSE 100 company (Pearson).2.         Patricia Hewitt, head of the DTI andMinister for Women.3.         Rachel Lomax, deputy governor of theBank of England.4.         Clara Furse, first female chair of theLondon Stock Exchange.5.         Val Gooding, chief executive of Bupa.6.         Baroness Hogg, chairman of 3i anddeputy chairman of GKN.7.         Kate Barker, member of the monetarypolicy committee. 7.        Marian Bell, member of themonetary policy committee.8.         Cherie Booth.9.         Rose Marie Bravo, Founder of Café Rougeand CEO of Spirit Taverns.ByRebecca HoarManagement Today, July 2004last_img read more

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Succession planning: Mind the gap

first_img Comments are closed. Businesses of all sizes are now under pressure to have succession plans in place. But how can you ensure you are prepared to fill a space? Virginia Matthews investigates.Last month’s resignation of Liberal Democrat leader Charles Kennedy – and the subsequent succession race – caused a frenzy that would be rare in the business world. Yet succession planning is climbing up the business agenda as thousands of organisations get to grips with a downsized workforce that leaves no room for unexpected absence, let alone sudden departures like Kennedy’s.Legal compliance, increased corporate governance and more volatile markets have also forced organisations to place more emphasis on succession. But it’s not just a case of who will fill the shoes of a departing chief executive. Organisations also need to consider issues as diverse as what happens when an office manager takes extended leave when their mother falls ill, or the deputy head of a department unexpectedly does a Shirley Valentine after a fortnight’s holiday in Greece.Levels of succession planning depend entirely on the culture of the organisation behind it. At retailing giant Tesco, it encompasses not just senior board executives, but also junior managers; whereas at soft drinks firm Britvic, succession planning is seen as a tool for handling only the very top positions.Susie Gear, a partner at consulting firm Accenture, says that succession planning is a hot issue both internally and for its clients.“Aside from the general job mobility and the belief that jobs are no longer for life, there is the need to take an increasingly long-term view of business performance,” she explains.“Corporates are under pressure from City analysts to both identify their future leaders and to ensure the organisation has real future value. Inevitably, much of that long-term value revolves around the strength of the CEO.”The key to succession planning, adds Gear, is that it should be inextricably linked to overall business strategy, and should involve the whole organisation, not just HR.Heir and a spareSo how long should an organisation plan for? Should the succession scheme be restricted to finding an ‘heir and a spare’ – as practised by monarchs of old – or should it be in force for the most trivial of eventualities?In defiance of traditional top-tier-only talent development schemes, a growing number of business leaders, including Bill Gates – who recently asked the head of each country in the Microsoft empire for a detailed presentation on the succession plan – believe that planning for ‘what if’ should spread throughout the organisation.Douglas Barnett, risk control strategy manager at Axa Insurance, believes that the succession plan should be seen as a high priority in these days of ‘no fat, no waste’ management and that HR should take ownership of the process.However, Kate Banks, group talent manager at Axa, disagrees. She believes that responsibility for succession arrangements should be handed over to the managers themselves. “If there’s a vacancy, we want our managers to look first at the succession plan but not to become slaves to it,” she says. “If the person expected to move into a role is still right for the job and they want it, then fine. If they aren’t interested, perhaps the succession plan should be torn up and a new one started.”Where Barnett and Banks do agree is on the vital role played by people in all aspects of business continuity. “Having the right people lined up to fill positions should be on a par with having the right terms and conditions or legal compliance,” says Barnett. “Whether it is holiday cover, sick leave, maternity, resignation or retirement, organisations need to be proactive on the issue of succession.” And it is important to recognise that the departure of a junior member of staff could have as great an impact on some parts of the business as the resignation of a key director.“Of course, it is vital that the next CEO of an oil company or bank is identified and groomed for succession, but that’s already understood,” says Barnett. “If you’re a young company, such as an online trader, where the key interface with the public is via mail order, then knowing who will run the mailroom if Tom walks under a bus is absolutely vital to your company and its reputation.”Britvic, which floated on the stock exchange in December, says that each of its 3,000 staff are given an individual set of ‘personal business objectives’, which are discussed and formulated with line managers on entry to the company, and can help them move to the next rung of the ladder.Yet the company believes that pure succession planning is of more relevance to senior management. It has recently appointed seven staff into ‘cross-functional’ roles, so they can learn about different aspects to the business on top of their own areas of expertise. “We feel this is a reflection of the strength of the system we already have in place,” says Shaun O’Hara, Britvic’s head of talent management and learning. “To develop our senior managers or leaders of the future, we have a high-potential assessment process in place that assesses candidates against a set of differentiators specifically designed for Britvic.”All candidates receive a feedback report, which can then help them plan their development. The successful ones enter a senior management development programme.Secret successorsTraditionally, banks or retailers have kept their succession plans largely secret – fearful that by giving the nod to ambitious employees and not to the happy-go-lucky ones, they might lose a key member of the team (albeit one who was unlikely ever to receive a key to the executive washroom).Today’s succession planning environment is far more transparent, says Barnett. “If it’s all done in secret by a committee and your career is mapped out for you behind your back,” he says, “then you may well feel aggrieved – particularly if you learn that you are not actually part of the succession plan.”He adds: “It must be made clear to all staff that discussion around succession is ongoing, not fixed, and that while someone may not be a key employee this time around, their role may be more pivotal, or the nature of the business radically different, by the time the next review takes place.”Organisations also need to adapt their succession strategies as the dynamics of the business change.“In one period, a firm may need to have a very cost-driven CEO, while in another, it may need an innovator who invests in new product development,” explains Gear. “For this reason, it is vital to have a number of individuals who could be considered CEO material, and it is important to keep the succession plan fluid rather than fixed.”Political parties often learn the succession lesson the hard way. In the business world, plenty of forward planning and flexibility mean this needn’t be the case.Every little helps at TescoAt Tesco, where virtually every member of the board has worked their way up through the business, succession planning “forms an important part of the career development and training of our people at all levels”, according to Claire Peters, resourcing and training manager.The supermarket chain has an ‘Options’ management training scheme for staff wishing to progress from, for example, general assistant to section leader. In addition, the company has a ‘Talent Spotting’ programme that is far broader and involves a career discussion for every member of staff each year. It has benefits, says the retailer, for the individual and the organisation.“Individuals’ skills are assessed, opportunities developed and people with the right skills can be matched to the right jobs when vacancies arise,” says Peters. “At the same time, individuals can be developed to meet the needs of the business.” Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article Succession planning: Mind the gapOn 21 Feb 2006 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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Kent Swig launches his own cryptocurrency

first_imgTerra Holdings’ Kent Swig (Swig Equities, iStock)Real estate investor and Terra Holdings owner Kent Swig has secured $6 billion in gold reserves to back his new cryptocurrency.DIGau, his digital token, will be pegged to the market price of the gold, Bloomberg News reported. The gold is guaranteed by liens that Swig and partner Stephen Braverman secured against mining claims in Nevada and Arizona through their company, Dignity Gold.Read moreBig on Bitcoin: Caruso now largest real estate firm to accept rent in cryptocurrencySocialite relists UES co-op for $45M The Covid churn: Inside resi brokerages’ recruiting games “Gold was one of the original rock-solid backings of all currencies,” Swig told the publication. “We’re not reinventing the wheel here. What we’re doing is applying the world’s stable backing of a lot of things to a very advanced technology.”ADVERTISEMENTWhile cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin have seen massive swings, pegging the new coin to a physical asset could stabilize it.Swig’s new coin isn’t the first attempt to combine gold and crypto; other attempts haven’t had much success, according to Bloomberg. But an interest in both has increased in recent years, as investors seek to protect themselves against inflation.Billionaire Rick Caruso’s real estate firm recently became the largest real estate firm to accept rent in cryptocurrency.[Bloomberg] — Sasha JonesContact Sasha Jones Email Address* Tags Full Name* Message* Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Share via Shortlink CryptocurrencyKent Swiglast_img read more

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A barcode of life database for the Cephalopoda? Considerations and concerns

first_imgThe concept of a Barcode of Life Database (BoLD) for the Class Cephalopoda (Phylum Mollusca) was introduced at the Cephalopod International Advisory Council (CIAC) symposium in Hobart, Australia, February 2006. This suggestion was met with significant interest, concern and debate. This review attempts to describe the concept of the BoLD initiative and to outline considerations and concerns specific to a cephalopod BoLD.last_img

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End-to-end in Southern Ocean ecosystems

first_imgSouthern Ocean ecosystems matter for us all because they are important in Earth System processes and contribute to food security; they are also undergoing some of the most rapid changes being seen anywhere on the planet. The changes are not uniform, with warming in some regions and cooling in others, and the ecological effects being observed in these areas also vary. These changes need to be interpreted in the context of historical changes generated by harvesting of marine mammals, fish and Antarctic krill at various times over the last two centuries. To examine the relative importance of the factors that determine ecosystem structure and functioning requires integrated analyses of whole ecosystem operation from ‘end-to-end’ (microbes to whales and from small (<10 km) to circumpolar scales). We present a perspective that highlights the urgent need for concerted action, and that analyses of Southern Ocean ecosystems have relevance for analyses of ecosystems across the global ocean.last_img read more

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The BEAMISH hot water drill system and its use on the Rutford Ice Stream, Antarctica

first_imgDuring the 2018/19 Antarctic field season, the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) Basal conditions on Rutford Ice Stream: BEd Access, Monitoring and Ice Sheet History’ (BEAMISH) project drilled three holes through the Rutford Ice Stream, West Antarctica. At up to 2154 m, these are the deepest hot water drilled subglacial access holes yet created, enabling the recovery of sediment from the subglacial environment, and instrumenting the ice stream and its bed. The BEAMISH hot-water drill system was built on extensive experience with the BAS ice shelf hot-water drill and utilises many identical components. With up to 1 MW of heating power available, the hot water drill produces 140 L min−1 of water at 85°C to create a 300 mm diameter access hole to the base of the ice stream. New systems and processes were developed for BEAMISH to aid critical aspects of deep access drilling, most notably the creation of cavities interlinking boreholes at 230 m below the surface and enabling water recirculation throughout the deep drilling operations. The modular design of the BEAMISH drill offers many benefits in its adaptability, redundancy, and minimal logistical footprint. These design features can easily accommodate the modifications needed for future deep, clean access hole creation in the exploration of subglacial environments.last_img read more

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Scoreboard roundup — 4/5/18

first_img Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailiStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Here are the scores from yesterday’s sports events:   AMERICAN LEAGUEBoston      3  Tampa Bay       2, 12 InningsTexas       6  Oakland         3Detroit     9  Chi White Sox   7, 10 InningsMinnesota   4  Seattle         2Baltimore   5  N-Y Yankees     2NATIONAL LEAGUEN.Y. Mets       8  Washington   2Philadelphia   5  Miami        0 Colorado       3  San Diego    1Pittsburgh     5  Cincinnati   2Arizona        3  St. Louis    1Chi Cubs       8  Milwaukee    0NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATIONIndiana    126  Golden State   106Cleveland  119  Washington     115Houston     96  Portland        94Brooklyn   119  Milwaukee      111Utah       117  L.A. Clippers   95Denver     100  Minnesota       96NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUEPittsburgh      5  Columbus      4; OT  Nashville       4  Washington    3Philadelphia    4  Carolina      3New Jersey      2  Toronto       1N.Y. Islanders   2  N.Y. Rangers   1Montreal        4  Detroit       3Florida         3  Boston        2Winnipeg        2  Calgary       1Edmonton        4  Vegas         3Vancouver       4  Arizona       3;  OT  L.A. Kings      5  Minnesota     4;  OT  San Jose        4  Colorado      2Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. April 5, 2018 /Sports News – National Scoreboard roundup — 4/5/18center_img Beau Lundlast_img read more

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Twitter calls out ‘policing of women’s bodies’ in sports

first_img Written by August 30, 2018 /Sports News – National Twitter calls out ‘policing of women’s bodies’ in sports FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailiStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Just days after Billy Jean King criticized the French Open’s tournament chief of “policing women’s bodies” for saying Serena Williams’ catsuit “would no longer be accepted,” the U.S. Open came under fire after a female player was penalized for briefly removing her top on the court.Once again, King, whose name graces the facility where the grand slam tournament is held annually in Queens, New York, was among the chorus of voices demanding change.“This rule is outdated and impractical,” she wrote on Twitter.Less than an hour later, the U.S. Open released a statement reversing its policy one day after the controversial call against French player Alize Cornet.“We regret that a code violation was assessed to Ms. Cornet yesterday,” the statement said. “We have clarified the policy to ensure this will not happen moving forward. Fortunately, she was only assessed a warning with no further penalty or fine.”According to the statement, all players will be allowed to change their shirts while sitting in the player chair.The statement added, “Female players, if they choose, may also change their shirts in a more private location close to the court, when available. They will not be assessed a bathroom break in this circumstance.”“The more these incidents come out, that’s a good thing,” Asha Dahya, founder and editor of GirlTalkHQ, told ABC News. “That’s going to lead to culture change more than policy ever will.”Dahya said both incidents point to a bigger systemic problem with the way that women’s bodies are policed.“Women’s bodies seem to be a commodity in public spaces,” she said. “Women’s bodies are regulated through policies, and their bodies are dissected by the media.”Dahya said incidents like these play a part in the #MeToo conversation over assault, harassment and gender disparity.“It’s about who is in the position to take advantage of others,” she said. “In the sporting arena, it’s who is around, who is making these rules. It’s men, not women.”The controversy started last week when French Open President Bernard Giudicelli said Williams and other players would have to dress more conservatively in future tournaments. According to The Independent, a U.K. newspaper, he singled out Williams in an interview with Tennis magazine, saying, “I believe we have sometimes gone too far. Serena’s outfit this year, for example, would no longer be accepted. You have to respect the game and the place.”His remarks went viral, with some of Williams’ fans calling them misogynistic and even racist. King was among those responding on Twitter.“The policing of women’s bodies must end,” the tennis great tweeted. “The ‘respect’ that’s needed is for the exceptional talent @serenawilliams brings to the game. Criticizing what she wears to work is where the true disrespect lies.”Williams, who said the fitted suit was designed to protect her against blood clots, laughed off the entire ordeal at a press conference at the U.S. Open days later.“Everything’s fine, guys,” she said. “When it comes to fashion, you don’t want to be a repeat offender.”To her point, Williams showed up for her opening match in Queens wearing a custom-designed tutu by Louis Vuitton designer Virgil Abloh and Nike. She paired it with NikeCourt Flare trainers and fishnet compression tights.Twitter went wild.A day later, as Cornet returned to the court following a 10-minute break from the 100-degree heat, she seemed to realize that her shirt was on backwards. She quickly pulled up her pink striped top and turned away from the court cameras as she took it off, showing her black-and-red sports bra underneath. Within seconds, Cornet put her shirt back on.The chair umpire overseeing the match immediately hit her with a code violation. The Women’s Tennis Association rulebook states that female players are only permitted to remove or change their clothing while they are off the court at the closest, most-private location. There is no such rule for male players.The incident drew immediate criticism on Twitter.“Alize Cornet came back to court after 10 minute heat break. Had her fresh shirt on back to front. Changed at back of court. Got a code violation. Unsportsmanlike conduct….. But the men can change shirts on court,” tweeted Scottish tennis coach Judy Murray, who is the mother of professional tennis player Andy Murray.Other Twitter users didn’t mince words and called the ruling “sexist.”“The most important thing we’ve seen is the backlash,” said Jane McManus, a longtime sportswriter for ESPN and other outlets.McManus recalled the 1999 Women’s World Cup final when Brandi Chastain ripped off her shirt and slid on the grass in her shorts and sports bra after scoring the winning penalty kick for the U.S. women’s team.“She wore far more than most women on the beach, but some said it distracted from the victory,” McManus said. “It ended up being such a huge moment for women in sports. It also became part of a conversation about whether it was appropriate.”Twenty years later, McManus said, the conversation has evolved from how women look and what they are wearing to “what is the most functional thing for women athletes to be wearing.”“I think overwhelmingly you’re seeing that women who are sports fans want that agency to be returned to women athletes,” McManus said.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.center_img Beau Lundlast_img read more

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