French Navy receives final B2M multi-mission ship

first_imgThe French defense procurement agency has accepted delivery of the fourth and final d’Entrecasteaux-class multi-mission ship from the Kership joint venture.Dumont d’Urville, as the unit is called, was delivered to the French Navy in a ceremony on April 5.Like its predecessors, the ship will sail from its current homeport in Brest to one of France’s overseas territories.B2M ships are constructed to carry out overseas missions of sovereignty, law enforcement and logistic support missions. The first ship in the class, FS d’Entrecasteaux, has been operating from Noumea, New Caledonia, since July 2016. Bougainville and Champlain, the third and fourth units in the class, are based in Tahiti and Réunion, respectively.The final ship will be based in Fort-de-France, Martinique.The 65-meter units displace 2,300 tons and are crewed by 20 sailors. They are capable of operating for up to 30 days before returning to port and achieve some 200 operational days a year.The vessels were delivered by Kership, a joint venture between DCNS and Piriou, under an initial three-ship contract from December 2013. A contract option for Dumont d’Urville was announced by DGA in 2015. View post tag: B2M View post tag: French Navy View post tag: KERSHIP View post tag: Dumont d’Urville Photo: Photo: French Navy Share this articlelast_img read more

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CherWell News – July

first_imgUniversity’s Royal Praise In the Pink: Beyon-slay All female Oxford a capella group In the Pink have released a Beyoncé medley, rehearsed and recorded remotely during lockdown. The group said: “We’re very much about girls empowering girls. We thought releasing a Beyoncé medley (arranged and produced by Priya Radhakrishnan) would be a great way to spread some joy and keep spirits high during lockdown! It’s lovely to know that our Beyoncé video put smiles on some faces as we’ve always had a blast getting to perform so many girl power anthems in one!” A huge mural of Sir David Attenborough has been painted in Cowley on the side of the East Oxford Games Hall by local artist Andrew Mani Manson, also known as The Big Orange M. Designed to honour the Cowley Road Carnival’s theme of ‘Mother Nature’ amidst its virtual celebrations, the documentary maker is depicted gazing at a brightly coloured butterfly resting on his finger. In the image’s corner, a quote from Attenborough is visible: “The future of humanity and indeed all life on earth now depends on us.” A new song – written by Alexander McCall Smith, the creator of The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency series, and performed by Tenebrae – has been released to raise funds for Oxford’s Covid-19 research fund. Hands of Hope thanks key workers and scientists, while commemorating lost lives and referencing the gradual easing of lockdown. The song will be re-recorded professionally when UK guidelines allow for this – then a final version will be released for download. Helen McShane, Professor of Vaccinology, said: “The Hand of Hope team has made an incredibly moving and fitting tribute to the frontline medical staff working to save lives and the scientists who are working around the clock to understand COVID-19 and find equitable solutions.” New Black History Prize New College Choir Lockdown Film Oxford has set up a new £250 prize for the best Final Honours School thesis on Black History. It will be named after Barbara D. Savage, previously a visiting professor in American History at the University during the 2018-19 academic year. Savage welcomed the prize, saying “I am excited that the prize will encourage Oxford students to explore black history with the creativity and commitment I saw during my time there as Harmsworth Professor in 2018-2019. It honours the field in which I work and am humbled that it bears my name.” This prize comes as students from various subjects have called to diversify the curriculum and amplify the voices of marginalised groups. Modern Art Oxford to Reopen As one of the first Malaysian women to become a professor at Oxford University, Dr Masliza Mahmod has been praised by several significant figures in Malaysia. Malaysia’s Director-General of Health (Datuk Dr Noor Hisham Abdullah) praised Mahmod’s brilliance, saying: “She is indeed a brilliant cardiologist and despite difficulties and challenges, her perseverance and deep passion in clinical research made her an outstanding academic cardiologist.” Malaysia’s monarch, Abdullah of Pahang, congratulated Mahmod: she “has made the nation proud… His Majesty hopes that Dr Masliza’s achievements and perseverance will be a source of inspiration for all Malaysians.”center_img Song Raises Funds for Covid Research Oxford Half Marathon in October Modern Art Oxford has announced that it will reopen on 11 August. Their exhibition Johanna Unzueta: Tools for Life has been extended. Online exhibitions have also been scheduled until early 2021, including Kiki Smith: I am a Wanderer and Lubaina Himid: Invisible Strategies. First Rapid Electric Charger in Oxford The Oxford Half Marathon will return on Sunday 11 October 2020. Restore, a local mental health charity, is currently looking for runners to participate. Basma El Doukhi, a Community Fundraiser, said “You may not recognise how much your actions impact others on a daily basis. You may think that what you do doesn’t make a difference or inspire others to do things with a greater impact… When others see you challenge yourself, they might follow your lead and start running, perhaps they’ll even join you in running the Oxford Half, or face a different fear or challenge in life. Be inspiring, create a difference, support a mental charity that is helping so many people affected by COVID-19, and run for Restore.” Last year, Restore set a personal record of 61 runners raising £14,800 between them. Giant David Attenborough Mural in Cowley Singers from New College Choir have joined with Positive Note, a production company, in a new film – apart / together. The film features shots of deserted chapels as the choir sings Bach’s Letzte Stunde. Robert Quinney, the Director of the Choir, writes: “This is the point where authoritative national research is needed to enable informed decisions about the viability of choral singing – which contributes so much to the nation’s spiritual cultural life, and to the education of so many people.” Also in local news, Oxford’s first 50kW rapid electric charger was installed in Cowley’s Marsh Road as part of the Electric Superhub Oxford (ESO) project, aiming to make Oxford a zero carbon city. ESO aims to save 10,000 tonnes of CO2 per year by 2021, rising to 25,000 tonnes per year by 2032. Tim Rose, ESO Programme Manager, Pivot Power explained: “These chargers, the vehicles that will use them and the information they deliver, will allow us to demonstrate how through research and real life actions, electric vehicles can form part of a smart, local energy system that accelerates Oxford’s journey to zero carbon and benefits the whole community.”last_img read more

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State Cites Security Threat In Bid To Block Syrian Refugees

first_imgState Cites Security Threat In Bid To Block Syrian RefugeesDave Stafford for www.theindianalawyer.comThe administration of Gov. Mike Pence defended its bid to halt the resettlement of Syrian refugees in Indiana by asserting the federal government has not satisfactorily addressed security concerns.The state through the office of Attorney General Greg Zoeller filed a65-page response brief late Friday to a nonprofit agency’s federal lawsuit. Exodus Refugee Immigration Inc. seeks an injunction barring the Pence administration from withholding federal grant funds for Syrian refugee resettlement. A hearing on the injunction request is scheduled for Feb. 15.Pence announced suspension of federal grants to Exodus in November,prompting the nonprofit’s lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana. The suit contends the state is preempted from actions that attempt to block resettlement because immigration and refugee resettlement are matters reserved for the federal government, which has thoroughly vetted those granted refugee status.“The State of Indiana, to this point, is not satisfied that the United States has adequately discharged its obligation to consult with the State concerning refugee resettlement, particularly as it relates to refugees fleeing Syria,” the state’s response brief says. “Given the serious public security risks posed by such refugees, State officials should be afforded more access to information concerning refugees resettling here, the process by which they were designated to come here, and the extent to which it is even possible to conduct a worthwhile review of their backgrounds. Accordingly, the Governor’s directive is part of a larger effort not only to defer resettlement of Syrian refugees without better background checks, but also to persuade the United States to consult more seriously with States.“Based on the available information to date, the Governor’s judgment is that such resettlements are not safe at this time, and his action carrying out that judgment is a restrained, targeted response to a very real security threat, well within the traditional authority of States to protect public safety,” the brief says.Despite Pence’s announcement and personal appeals, Exodus proceeded with a planned resettlement of a family of four. Exodus plans to resettle additional Syrian families in Indiana this year.The state’s brief warns terrorists have infiltrated the United States and other nations posing as refugees and argues Obama administration officials expressed concerns about potential gaps in the vetting process.But the state in its response also argues Exodus has no standing to assert the equal protection rights of refugees. “(W)hile the Governor’s directive may harm Exodus’s economic interests, it does not harm the refugees,” the brief says. “Exodus has said it will resettle future Syrian refugees regardless of the Governor’s directive … and the state will continue to pay benefits directly to refugees who are resettled here (though it will not pay Exodus’s social services resettlement claims.)”Meanwhile, a top ACLU immigration attorney, Cecillia Wang, director of the ACLU Immigrants’ Rights Project, has entered an appearance in the litigation. ACLU officials did not reply to messages seeking comment.The case before Judge Tanya Walton Pratt in the District Court for the Southern District of Indiana is Exodus Refugee Immigration, Inc. v. Pence, et al., 1:15-CV-01858.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Tesco’s financial officer is called in months early

first_imgTesco has pushed forward the start date of chief financial officer Alan Stewart by more than two months, as he begins with immediate effect. Stewart has been in the same role at Marks & Spencer for the past four years.He was due to join Tesco on 1 December, but negotiations with Marks and Spencer allowed his start sate at the supermarket to be brought forward.His early employment comes after the struggling supermarket giant uncovered a “serious issue” with accounts, and suspended four executives as a result of this.The company estimated there had been an overstatement on profits for the past six months by £250m.It has enlisted Deloitte to carry out an investigation into the issue, who will work alongside the company’s lawyers at Freshfields.Shares have continued to fall from 229p on Friday, to 195p Tuesday afternoon.last_img read more

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Umphrey’s McGee Brings Six-Song Second Set, ‘I Am The Walrus’ To Syracuse [Videos]

first_imgUmphrey’s McGee continued their summer tour domination last night, playing a scorching show at the F Shed in Syracuse, NY. With opening support from Brownout, fans were primed and ready for some serious musical power for Umphrey’s McGee. The band delivered a walloping performance, delving deep into their catalog and pulling out some serious home runs.The band opened up with a big “Walletsworth,” before bringing classic tunes “Der Bluten Kat” and “Anchor Drops” together for a jam sandwich. The “DBK” > “Anchor” > “DBK” kept the first set rolling, before jumping into 2016 favorite “Turn & Run.” “#5” came next, before the third-ever performance of the classic Squeeze song “Tempted.” Finally, “The Floor” closed out the first set in its awesome fashion.The second set saw the band get even tighter with their jamming, playing a six-song improvisational masterpiece. The set started with “The Crooked One,” stretching it out for a good 12 minutes before dropping into “Remind Me.” They stretched that song out as well, and cruised into “Miami Virtue” for another big time jam. After 13 minutes, the band segued into “The Bottom Half,” working their magic before delivering the final combination of “Uncle Wally” into “Mulche’s Odyssey.” What a set!The encore saw the band bring out “Much Obliged,” before ending the night with their second cover selection: “I Am The Walrus” by The Beatles. Goo goo g’joob.Watch some highlights from the show below, courtesy of Dancintank on YouTube: Setlist: Umphrey’s McGee at F Shed, Syracuse, NY – 8/14/16Set 1: Walletsworth, Der Bluten Kat > Anchor Drops > Der Bluten Kat, Turn and Run, #5, Tempted, The FloorSet 2: The Crooked One > Remind Me, Miami Virtue > The Bottom Half, Uncle Wally > Mulche’s OdysseyEncore: Much Obliged > I Am The Walruslast_img read more

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Phish Wraps Mexico Run With First Stand-Alone “Mike’s Groove” In 21 Years, Monstrous “3rd Set” Encore

first_imgOn Saturday night, Phish continued their south of the border excursion with their third and final performance in Riviera Maya, Mexico.Phish opened up their first set with “The Curtain With”, also played in the opening slot at their 1/14/2017 Riviera Maya show. Trey Anastasio took no time to get things fired up, laying down some of his intricate composed work, with Page McConnell following closely behind. With the standard and spot-on “The Curtain With” opener , the quartet smoothly moved forward with “Punch You In The Eye”. Trey and Mike Gordon stepped front and center with smiles from ear-to-ear, breaking down into their signature “Punch” dance, as the beachfront crowd erupted with applause. Page let it all hang out on his grand piano, spitting back jazz-infused licks with Anastasio’s scorching guitar solos.It was clear the band was ready to continue fueling the fire, diving head first into “Blaze On”. Trey couldn’t contain his excitement as he belted out the lyrics, inviting Page to dazzle the crowd with an explosive piano solo. With Jon Fishman and Mike locking into a tight-knit groove pocket, the duo propelled the jam into a rocking segment, before Page took things into his own hands and added a dark and spooky element to the jam’s closure. Mike led the charge into “Destiny Unbound”, dropping some colossal bass bombs before taking the lead on vocals. Trey was out in his finest form on Saturday night, as he ripped through a series of gritty guitar solos backed by Fishman’s hard-hitting beats.With no brief pause or break to catch their breaths so far in the set, Phish smoothly segued into “Most Events Aren’t Planned”, Page’s Vida Blue original that the band has only played live four times since its debut at the band’s iconic Baker’s Dozen run. Page sounded bold and confident with his vocal lead before moving into the tune’s uptempo breakdown. With Page amping things up with a funky synth-infused showdown, Trey took no time to join in the fun, tenaciously charging into a high-voltage, ever-evolving solo. Phish continued pushing forward with a breezy oceanside rendition of “Divided Sky” before taking their first chance to pause and grab a sip of water. Trey let out the opening riff for “Steam”, with Mike and Fishman locking into the tune’s infectious groove. There is no denying Trey was on one last night, as he unleashed his inner “dark and evil” concealed within the theme before the “Steam” disappeared, and Phish triumphantly marched into a set closing “Chalk Dust Torture”.Phish showed no signs of slowing down, as they came back out to open their second set with a bouncy “First Tube”. Trey threw down some sinister wails out of the gates before jumping around like a mad man all over the stage. Fishman and Mike are a rhythmic force to be reckoned with, as they laid down a fierce backbeat for Trey to continue his hot-streak with a scorching guitar peak. As Chris Kuroda’s mind-bending rainbow light patterns reflected off of the Caribbean coastline water, Phish moved forward with “Mike’s Song”. For the first time since 1998, the band decided to toss zilch in the middle of their usual “Mikes Groove” sandwich, moving straight forward with a plinko-heavy “Weekapaug Groove”. With Trey dancing around on his pedals, some hints of “First Tube” reemerged, followed by a ripping finale back into the vocal closing segment of “Weekapaug”.Phish kept it rolling with “Fuego”, igniting a full-fledged dance party for those lucky enough to be boogying under the Spanish moon. A standard but smooth-sailing “Fuego” led way to “Tweezer”, as Trey dialed things in, leading his bandmates into an at first eerie and dark jam, which quickly took a hard-turn into blissful Type II jam territory.  With Fishman laying down the foundation, Page and Trey connected and found their sweet spot, progressively evolving into an earth-shattering peak. Slowing down the tempo coming out of “Tweezer”, and a possible hint of a forthcoming slower tune was the biggest fake out of the evening, as Phish crashed into “Carini”.Last night’s “Carini” was as tender and silky-smooth as it gets, the Phish that every fans travels thousands of miles and through international customs to bask in. With Trey laying down some heavy-fan action on his Languedoc, he quickly spit out the “Tweezer” lick before taking the charge forward with the opening “Ghost” riff. “Ghost” lasted no longer than a few minutes, as the band made the game-time decision to shower the crowd with a set-closing “Say It To Me S.A.N.T.O.S.”. Highlighted by Trey’s newly added lyrics of “We are vapor, we are liquid, we are love”, Gordon paved the way into last night’s scorching improvisational “S.A.N.T.O.S” segment, giving Trey once last chance to blaze on with a red-hot solo.Phish returned to the stage with a massive, multi-faceted encore, beginning with “Simple”.  Moving out of “Simple”, the band pushed forward with a “Martian Monster” chock-full of quotes and shenanigans, including “Spanish Moon”, “Death Don’t Hurt Very Long”, and “Sanity”. The biggest surprise of the night came next with “Kung”, played last over Phish’s 2016 New Year’s run. “Kung” contained “Shipwreck” teases from Page, followed up by “Big Black Furry Creature from Mars”, which was lathered with “Martian Monster” quotes. Trey took a brief moment to thank C.I.D. Entertainment and founder Dan Berkowitz for putting on such a magical event, before letting Fishman take the lead into a crowd-assisted “Sleeping Monkey”. “Tweezer Reprise” brought the marathon of an encore to a close, capping off undoubtedly Phish’s greatest Mexico run they’ve played.Setlist: Phish | Riviera Maya, Mexico | 2/23/19Set One: The Curtain With > Punch You In The Eye > Blaze On > Destiny Unbound > Most Events Aren’t Planned > Divided Sky, Steam, Chalk Dust TortureSet Two: First Tube, Mike’s Song > Weekapaug Groove, Fuego , Tweezer > Carini , Ghost > Say It To Me S.A.N.T.O.S.Encore: Simple > Martian Monster > Kung > Big Black Furry Creature from Mars, Sleeping Monkey > Tweezer Repriselast_img read more

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NIH makes $8.5M investment in promising projects

first_imgEight Harvard scientists will receive nearly $8.5 million in funding through the National Institutes of Health’s High Risk, High Reward program to support research into a host of questions, ranging from understanding humans’ music faculty to the growth of axons to storing and reading out information from DNA.Ahmed Badran, a postdoctoral fellow in chemistry and chemical biology, will receive an Early Independence Award; Charles Lieber, the Joshua and Beth Friedman University Professor and chair of the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, will receive a Pioneer Award; Jeffrey Macklis, the Max and Anne Wien Professor of Life Sciences in the Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology and professor of surgery and neurology, will receive a Pioneer Award; Samuel Mehr, postdoctoral fellow in psychology, will receive an Early Independence Award; Sherri Rose, associate professor of health care policy, will receive a New Innovator Award; Alexander Schier, Leo Erikson Life Sciences Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology, will receive a Pioneer Award; David Sinclair, professor of genetics, will receive a Pioneer Award; and Zirui Song, assistant professor of health care policy, will receive an Early Independence Award.“I continually point to this program as an example of the creative and revolutionary research the NIH is supporting,” said Francis S. Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). “The quality of the investigators and the impact their research has on the biomedical field is astounding. I always look forward to seeing what the new awardees are proposing and to watching how it is accomplished over the years.”Ahmed Badran“I am absolutely thrilled and honored to have been selected as recipient of the 2017 NIH Early Independence Award,” Badran said. “This funding has already allowed my lab to delve into dissecting ribosomal biology, and we are excited to see how the area of research develops over the course of the next five years.”Arguably the most ancient molecule on the planet Earth, the ribosome carries out one of the critical functions that biologists use to define life — translating information encoded within the genome into proteins.Despite its critical role, studying ribosomes and the translation process remains an uphill battle, Badran said, for two reasons.The ribosome is a wildly complex biological machine — in most organisms it consists of three RNAs and more than 50 proteins. What’s more, because they are an essential requirement for life, even minor modifications to ribosomes or their components can have disastrous consequences for cells, making it a challenge to understand how each piece works.Badran seeks to understand protein translation by generating slightly modified ribosomes capable of translating just a single gene, which acts as a reporter of activity, while leaving native ribosomes to translate all the cellular proteins needed to keep the cell working properly.“Through this approach, we have already learned much about the various kinetic parameters affecting in vivo translation and even begun to dissect the origin of the ribosome and translation itself,” Badran said. “Our continued efforts will hopefully illuminate the basic biological principles underlying ribosomal biogenesis and catalytic efficiency. Through this improved understanding, we aim to provide avenues for the production of novel non-proteogenic biomolecules, and perhaps one day robustly predict resistance profiles for commonly used anti-ribosomal antibiotics.”Charles LieberLieber plans to use the funding from the NIH Pioneer Award to continue to develop the capabilities of the syringe-injectable mesh electronics for stable monitoring and modulation of neural circuitry.“We are really excited to bring the unique capabilities of our system to bear on addressing the evolution of neural circuitry associated with natural and pathological aging, and exploring new concepts for ameliorating or even overcoming associated cognitive declines,” Lieber said. “This technology provides a new window into brain science and opportunities for electronic therapeutics.”It was particularly gratifying, Lieber said, to find that the noted biologists and clinicians who comprised the committee reviewing the grant applications were excited about the potential for the injectable mesh.“This confirms that my vision is indeed a good one, and I now have the resources to follow through,” he said. “The funding [is] also exciting because it provides us with the flexibility to not only pursue high-risk, but potentially revolutionary new capabilities for the mesh electronics paradigm, [which] will allow us to explore their unique capabilities as a tool to investigate and ultimately [create] neural prosthetics for the retina, spinal cord and neuromuscular junctions.“As a final example, this funding will really help our goal of translating the work to human studies and ultimately human therapeutics/brain-machine interfaces,” he added. “Indeed, the funding has allowed planning for and taking steps toward the first human acute measurements with Dr. Sydney S. Cash, from the Department of Neurology at Massachusetts General Hospital. We’re really excited for what the future holds.”Jeffrey MacklisReceiving a Pioneer Award, Macklis said, will enable him to explore some of the central questions in neuroscience, ranging from what molecular machinery directly implements the specificity of initial developmental “wiring” of the brain to why that wiring cannot naturally regenerate.Macklis’ work is focused on structures known as “growth cones,” which — guided by signals in the nervous system — direct the growth of axons to create the synaptic connections between neurons.Understanding those signals, however, has been a challenge.“These questions have been inaccessible in multiple core aspects,” Macklis said. “We are now able to directly investigate molecular machinery of distinct growth-cone subtypes, thus distinct circuits, as they build, grow, mature, become diseased, and are potentially manipulated therapeutically.“We have developed an entirely new set of approaches to discover essentially the entire molecular machinery, both proteins and various types of RNAs, that function in the growth cones at critical times during development,” he added. “We may even be able to examine these circuits later, during function, disease, or during attempts at regeneration.”“My lab and I are extremely excited to have the opportunities made possible by this award,” Macklis continued. “We are looking forward to discovering new ways that neurons control their initial growth and later function to be so highly specific to enable us to read and think and make art and perform all of our other human capabilities.“What makes this Pioneer Award so wonderful is that it is designed for exploration, discovery, and pioneering, even if risky and out of our comfort zone. We have more standard grant funding, of course, for work with more tightly defined questions and lower risk outcomes, but this award is totally different. I am already establishing new collaborations outside and within neuroscience to look at some very unconventional possibilities raised by our work so far. We are excited at what we might find, since neurons appear to have some surprises in store for us!”Samuel MehrMehr plans to use the funding from his Early Independence Award to understand some basic questions about music and humans’ affinity for it.“The news is still sinking in as I start putting my lab together,” Mehr said. “After spending years working with my fantastic mentors — Elizabeth Spelke, Steve Pinker, Howard Gardner, and Max Krasnow — I’m still getting used to saying ‘my lab’!”Among the questions Mehr plans to explore: what aspects of music are universal and what aspects vary across cultures, how infant behavior and affect are altered by music, and whether and how families might use music to improve health-related outcomes for infants and parents.“This award came as a complete surprise,” he said. “I’m thankful and humbled that the NIH is making this investment in my research. It’s a great honor.“The grant makes it possible for me to create a lab in psychology that is focused purely on music, with a solid team of researchers, and all the resources we need to build a research program from the ground up,” he added. “I’m very excited to get started!”Sherri Rose“I am beyond honored to be selected for an NIH Director’s New Innovator Award,” said Rose. “My research program focuses on integrating novel statistical methods to advance human health, with a particular focus on comparative effectiveness, risk adjustment, and health program impact evaluation.”With the NIH funding, Rose plans to expand her work on developing statistical machine-learning techniques that can be applied to the challenges of making predictions, causal inferences, or generalizing results from randomized and observational studies.Among the questions she hopes to address is the role of health insurance on health outcomes in low-income populations, a project that will involve new, risky, big-data linkages from multiple sources. Ultimately, Rose and colleagues plan to create open-source data-science tools for the research community to use in varied applications.“Finding out I received this grant was easily one of the most memorable days of my faculty career so far,” Rose said. “I was about to step into an elevator after watching my visiting undergraduate students present their summer project when I saw the email. I was speechless! The NIH Director’s New Innovator Award program gives investigators incredible freedom and flexibility to try to solve broad scientific problems.”Alexander Schier Analogous to tape recorders that record and store information on magnetic tape, Schier aims to use the funding from his Pioneer Award to develop technologies capable of introducing new information into the DNA of a cell.“Scientists always think about the future because that’s where we hope to find the answers to today’s big puzzles,” Schier said. “I am thrilled that the NIH believes that my lab can be a pioneer in exploring that future.”The power of such DNA-based recording, he said, lies in its permanence and easy retrieval by sequencing.As an example, Schier suggested that researchers might attempt to induce changes in DNA by exposing cells to an environmental signal, then sequencing their DNA days or months later. By determining which cells changed their DNA sequence, they would be able to deduce which cells received the signal.David SinclairIn recent years, researchers working in Sinclair’s lab have discovered hundreds of new human protein-coding genes that might be used to identify new causes of disease, as well as potential therapies to treat them.Sinclair plans to use the funding from the Pioneer Award to study those genes with a goal of developing revolutionary medicines based on what they can uncover.Currently, he said, there are only a handful of small human hormones. “Our work suggests there are hundreds more that have been missed because of their small size. We believe many of these could lead to revolutionary drugs.“My lab members and I are deeply honored to be receiving this funding to push the boundaries of medical knowledge,” Sinclair said. “This work is a platform for our lab and thousands of others to uncover new hormones in the human body.”Zirui Song “It is an honor to receive this grant and join a community of colleagues whose work is inspiring and impactful,” Song said. “I am grateful to the faculty and colleagues whose mentorship prepared me to pursue this work, and to Harvard Medical School for nominating me as a candidate.”Supported by funding from the Early Independence Award, Song plans to continue to focus on strategies to improve the value of care, understand the impact of payment changes, and address important questions in federal programs such as Medicare Advantage.In particular, he said, the grant provides the opportunity to advance research related to delivery-system reform and further our understanding of how different segments of the population fare in the age of health care reform.“The sustainability of our health care system, the value of care we deliver, and the ways that providers and payers can work together to help patients navigate this era of change are key issues in health policy that I hope this work will contribute to in the years ahead,” he said.last_img read more

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Beautiful’s Anika Larsen on Her Pregnancy & Baby Guru Kelli O’Hara

first_imgBeautiful Tony nominee Anika Larsen is expecting her first child with partner Freddie Maxwell in late June. Of course, balancing eight shows a week with pregnancy can be tricky, so Larsen turned to someone who really knows babies and Broadway: five-time Tony nominee Kelli O’Hara. “When I was still having to be secretive about it, I bumped into Kelli and thought, ‘She’s the one to talk to!’ She’s done it twice now—gotten pregnant while she was on Broadway—so I sidled up to her and told her my news,” says Larsen. “Kelli has insisted on being my buddy throughout this, and she’s been incredibly helpful about what to expect. [Like] when to tell my dresser in secret, so she could move a button for me, or when I was going to have to tell wardrobe that there would have to be bigger alterations “Larsen, who is about four months along in her pregnancy, says she’s not showing yet, but she’s noticed plenty of other changes: “The baby’s a size of an avocado this week, so it means that it’s definitely pushing against my bladder. I have to pee during every single costume change now.”The excited expectant parents had a Beautiful beginning to their relationship. Larsen met Maxwell when her dresser set them up on a blind date last February. “We’re old enough to know what we want and to recognize when we’ve found it and snatch it and never let it go,” she says about their whirlwind romance. “We’ve been on turbo-speed.”The actress says she doesn’t have a timeline yet for when she’ll leave the show, but she does guarantee she’ll be back: “I’ve never done this before, so we’re just going to play it by ear.” Beautiful: The Carole King Musical Star Files Anika Larsen Show Closed This production ended its run on Oct. 27, 2019 View Comments Related Showslast_img read more

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Joel Grey & Stephen Daldry Among 2015 Drama League Award Honorees

first_img View Comments The Drama League will give special recognition to Tony and Oscar winner Joel Grey, Tony and Olivier-winning director Stephen Daldry and WNET’s Neal Shapiro and David Horn. As previously reported, the 81st annual Drama League Awards ceremony will take place on May 15 in the Broadway Ballroom at the Marriott Marquis Times Square. A host for the evening will be announced soon.Grey will receive the Distinguished Achievement in Musical Theater Award. He is perhaps most known for creating the role of the Emcee in Cabaret which won him a Tony Award in 1967 and an Oscar in 1973. He was also Tony nominated for his performances in George M!, Goodtime Charley, The Grand Tour and for directing the 2011 revival of The Normal Heart. His additional credits include Chicago and Wicked.Daldry will be honored with the Founders Award for Excellence in Directing. His productions of Skylight and The Audience are currently on Broadway this season. He won Tony awards in 1994 and 2009 for helming An Inspector Calls and Billy Elliot, respectively.Shapiro, CEO of WNET, and Horn, Executive Producer of Great Performances and Director of Performance and Arts Programming at WNET, are responsible for bringing arts education and programming to the New York City region through networks Thirteen, WLIW21 and NJTV. In addition to these special honors, nominations for the five competitive Drama League categories (Distinguished Play, Distinguished Revival of a Play, Distinguished Best Musical, Distinguished Revival of a Musical and Distinguished Performance) will be announced on April 21.last_img read more

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Small farmer workshop

first_imgA workshop for small-scale farmers and home gardeners interested in growing and marketing vegetables for profit is set for Sept. 20 on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin. Taught by UGA Cooperative Extension vegetable horticulturist Bob Westerfield, the class will cover the basics of how to begin earning extra income by growing and selling vegetables. Workshop topics will include which vegetables to grow, how to grow them, using plastic mulch and high tunnels, understanding soils, equipment selection and pest identification and control. The workshop is designed for beginning growers or homeowners who would like to sell their produce at a farmers market, at a roadside stand or to individuals. The program will be held from 9 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. at the UGA Research and Education Garden off Ellis Road in Griffin. The cost of the workshop is $39, which includes all materials, lunch and break refreshments. For more information or to register, call Beth Horne at (770) 228-7214 or email her at [email protected]last_img read more

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