The BEAMISH hot water drill system and its use on the Rutford Ice Stream, Antarctica

first_imgDuring the 2018/19 Antarctic field season, the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) Basal conditions on Rutford Ice Stream: BEd Access, Monitoring and Ice Sheet History’ (BEAMISH) project drilled three holes through the Rutford Ice Stream, West Antarctica. At up to 2154 m, these are the deepest hot water drilled subglacial access holes yet created, enabling the recovery of sediment from the subglacial environment, and instrumenting the ice stream and its bed. The BEAMISH hot-water drill system was built on extensive experience with the BAS ice shelf hot-water drill and utilises many identical components. With up to 1 MW of heating power available, the hot water drill produces 140 L min−1 of water at 85°C to create a 300 mm diameter access hole to the base of the ice stream. New systems and processes were developed for BEAMISH to aid critical aspects of deep access drilling, most notably the creation of cavities interlinking boreholes at 230 m below the surface and enabling water recirculation throughout the deep drilling operations. The modular design of the BEAMISH drill offers many benefits in its adaptability, redundancy, and minimal logistical footprint. These design features can easily accommodate the modifications needed for future deep, clean access hole creation in the exploration of subglacial environments.last_img read more

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Psychiatrist

first_imgRowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine is currentlyseeking a talented Psychiatrist to join our growing Department ofPsychiatry located in Southern New Jersey.This position is for a full-time adult psychiatrist with anacademic faculty appointment. The successful candidate will haveexperience in adult inpatient and outpatient care. Responsibilitiesinclude teaching medical students and residents and leading aninterdisciplinary team. Applicants must have an MD or DO degree,able to obtain or currently have a valid NJ Medical license, CDSand DEA and be AOBNP/ABPN Board Certified/Board Eligible.Salary is competitive and is accompanied by a comprehensivebenefits package.Our clinical campus is located in Southern New Jersey, which iswithin the Philadelphia metropolitan area approximately eight milesfrom Center City Philadelphia, one hour from the Jersey Shore, andhour and a half from NYC and two hours from Washington, DC.Rowan University values diversity and is committed to equalopportunity in employment.All positions are contingent upon budget appropriations.Advertised: Jan 30 2020 Eastern Standard TimeApplications close:last_img read more

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Report: South Bend now tops for robberies in Indiana

first_imgIndianaLocalNews Twitter Pinterest By Jon Zimney – March 22, 2021 0 356 Facebook WhatsApp Report: South Bend now tops for robberies in Indiana WhatsApp (Photo supplied/ABC 57) Some crimes may be up across the state, but robberies are on the decline.A new report from YourLocalSecurity.com says robberies in Indiana have decreased by 34%.It’s an improvement over last October’s report, which had Indianapolis as the top city for robberies in Indiana. That spot now belongs to South Bend, with about 26 robberies per 10,000 people.The reports use several pieces of data for each analysis, including statistics provided by the FBI. Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Google+ Previous articleSeveral local police agencies to conduct spring bus stop patrolsNext articleBoy, 14, faces murder and child molestation charges connected to death of New Carlisle girl Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney.last_img read more

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Greencore makes two new appointments

first_imgThe board of Greencore has appointed two non-executive directors – Heather McSharry and John Warren – who will join on 30 January 2013.The appointments follow the decision by chairman Ned Sullivan and non-executive director Pat McCann, announced in November, to retire from the board of Greencore at the Annual General Meeting, due to be held on 29 January.McSharry is currently a non-executive director of building materials company CRH, chairman of the Bank of Ireland Pension Fund Trustee Board and serves on the board of the Industrial Development Agency in Ireland.Warren is currently a non-executive director of The Rank Group, Bovis Homes Group, Spectris, 4imprint and Welsh Water. He is a former group finance director of United Biscuits, and also a former chairman of Uniq – which was acquired by Greencore in September 2011.Gary Kennedy, chairman designate, said: “On behalf of everybody at Greencore, I would like to welcome these outstanding market leaders to the board. Their diverse skills and international experience in markets will bring a greater focus for the group as it moves forward in its development.”last_img read more

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The Chilean Military Promotes Diversity by Recruiting Indigenous People

first_imgBy Dialogo January 15, 2015 The Chilean Military is recruiting indigenous men and women to join its ranks, part of an effort to represent the country’s diversity in the Armed Forces. “This initiative is the result of a cultural change towards respecting and integrating the various peoples into the national reality,” said National Defense Minister Jorge Burgos during his opening speech at the “Seminar on Indigenous Peoples and Defense” at the Joint Center for Peace Operations of Chile (CECOPAC). The seminar was held on December 3 at the General René Schneider Military Base, in La Reina. The first commitment was the creation of an indigenous law, Law 19,253, and indigenous institutions; the ratification of Convention 169 of the International Labor Organization (ILO) came in 2008; and the third commitment was the constitutional recognition that there is a standing debt with the original peoples of Chile. In recent years, this effort “has been gaining strength,” said Miguel Navarro, a researcher with the National Academy of Political and Strategic Studies (ANEPE) in Chile. “Until we value cultural diversity and recognize ourselves as a multicultural society, Chile can never legitimately aspire to development,” Burgos added. The government “will foster and promote the rights of indigenous peoples and will adapt its internal mechanisms to effectively implement the international treaties that Chile has ratified on this issue, as well as ensuring that indigenous peoples have access to their natural resources.” Addressing a historic debt “This initiative is the result of a cultural change towards respecting and integrating the various peoples into the national reality,” said National Defense Minister Jorge Burgos during his opening speech at the “Seminar on Indigenous Peoples and Defense” at the Joint Center for Peace Operations of Chile (CECOPAC). The seminar was held on December 3 at the General René Schneider Military Base, in La Reina. “The Ministry of Defense has wanted to be a pioneer in this field and therefore established a team focused on inclusion to generate internal policies that effectively advance not just the indigenous issue, but also issues related to gender, disabilities and sexual diversity,” Burgos said during the December 3 seminar. “Until we value cultural diversity and recognize ourselves as a multicultural society, Chile can never legitimately aspire to development,” Burgos added. The government “will foster and promote the rights of indigenous peoples and will adapt its internal mechanisms to effectively implement the international treaties that Chile has ratified on this issue, as well as ensuring that indigenous peoples have access to their natural resources.” Historically, Military institutions, particularly the Army, have been viewed by many Chileans as a mechanism for social mobility, which has attracted indigenous people to the Armed Forces. In 1989, presidential candidate Patricio Aylwin joined with representatives of indigenous peoples from throughout Chile in a “New Imperial Agreement” in which three commitments were established, according to the Ministry of Defense. The Armed Forces has been recruiting more minorities and women into its ranks for at least 25 years. “The Ministry of Defense has wanted to be a pioneer in this field and therefore established a team focused on inclusion to generate internal policies that effectively advance not just the indigenous issue, but also issues related to gender, disabilities and sexual diversity,” Burgos said during the December 3 seminar. Officials from the Chilean Army, Navy, and Air Force attended the conference. They were joined by leaders from indigenous groups, academicians, and representatives from the Armed Forces of Canada and New Zealand, who spoke about their respective experiences with recruiting efforts to increase diversity. The Mapuche people are well represented in the Military Historically, Military institutions, particularly the Army, have been viewed by many Chileans as a mechanism for social mobility, which has attracted indigenous people to the Armed Forces. The campaign to increase diversity within Chile’s Armed Forces will address the country’s “historic debt” with indigenous people, according to a December 2 press release from the Ministry of Defense. Chilean Military officials are seeking to add indigenous recruits to the ranks of the countrys 64,000 members of the Armed Forces. The size of the Armed Forces has declined from nearly 81,000 Troops in 2004. While it has declined in size, the Chilean Armed Forces has greatly improved its technological capabilities in recent years, according to Navarro. “There has always been a significant proportion of Mapuche in the Armed Forces,” explained Navarro. “The Mapuche are considered to be very good soldiers and have not had any limitations in making it to the highest ranks within military institutions.” In 1989, presidential candidate Patricio Aylwin joined with representatives of indigenous peoples from throughout Chile in a “New Imperial Agreement” in which three commitments were established, according to the Ministry of Defense. “There has always been a significant proportion of Mapuche in the Armed Forces,” explained Navarro. “The Mapuche are considered to be very good soldiers and have not had any limitations in making it to the highest ranks within military institutions.” The campaign is being promoted by high-ranking officials, including Undersecretary of the Armed Forces Gabriel Gaspar. Currently, indigenous people account for about three percent of all recruits, the Diario Uchile newspaper reported on December 16. In recent years, this effort “has been gaining strength,” said Miguel Navarro, a researcher with the National Academy of Political and Strategic Studies (ANEPE) in Chile. The country’s largest indigenous group, the Mapuche people, is well represented in the Military. The Mapuche people, who are also known as “Arucanos,” live in south-central Chile and have a strong sense of cultural identity. The campaign is being promoted by high-ranking officials, including Undersecretary of the Armed Forces Gabriel Gaspar. Currently, indigenous people account for about three percent of all recruits, the Diario Uchile newspaper reported on December 16. The first commitment was the creation of an indigenous law, Law 19,253, and indigenous institutions; the ratification of Convention 169 of the International Labor Organization (ILO) came in 2008; and the third commitment was the constitutional recognition that there is a standing debt with the original peoples of Chile. MThe Armed Forces of Chile, which had 80,900 troops in 2004, declined to a force of 64,200 eight years later, according to the Military Statistics for South America, 2013 published by the website Nueva Mayoría. Officials from the Chilean Army, Navy, and Air Force attended the conference. They were joined by leaders from indigenous groups, academicians, and representatives from the Armed Forces of Canada and New Zealand, who spoke about their respective experiences with recruiting efforts to increase diversity. Chile’s indigenous population is at 1.71 million (out of 16 million total), according to figures from the 2012 Census; of those, 84 percent identify themselves as Mapuches, with the rest divided among 10 other ethnic groups. Most of the country’s indigenous people live in metropolitan regions. The country’s largest indigenous group, the Mapuche people, is well represented in the Military. The Mapuche people, who are also known as “Arucanos,” live in south-central Chile and have a strong sense of cultural identity. The campaign to increase diversity within Chile’s Armed Forces will address the country’s “historic debt” with indigenous people, according to a December 2 press release from the Ministry of Defense. The Chilean Military is recruiting indigenous men and women to join its ranks, part of an effort to represent the country’s diversity in the Armed Forces. The Mapuche people are well represented in the Military Chile’s indigenous population is at 1.71 million (out of 16 million total), according to figures from the 2012 Census; of those, 84 percent identify themselves as Mapuches, with the rest divided among 10 other ethnic groups. Most of the country’s indigenous people live in metropolitan regions. The Armed Forces has been recruiting more minorities and women into its ranks for at least 25 years. Chilean Military officials are seeking to add indigenous recruits to the ranks of the countrys 64,000 members of the Armed Forces. The size of the Armed Forces has declined from nearly 81,000 Troops in 2004. While it has declined in size, the Chilean Armed Forces has greatly improved its technological capabilities in recent years, according to Navarro. Addressing a historic debt MThe Armed Forces of Chile, which had 80,900 troops in 2004, declined to a force of 64,200 eight years later, according to the Military Statistics for South America, 2013 published by the website Nueva Mayoría.last_img read more

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County judges work to coordinate education efforts

first_imgCounty judges work to coordinate education effortsAmy K. Brown Assistant Editor Increasing public trust and confidence in the courts has long been a focus of the judiciary, and now the Conference of County Court Judges of Florida is taking steps to coordinate the public education efforts of county judges throughout the state. At a March 8 meeting of the Conference, representatives from each of the state’s 20 circuits met as part of the Public Education of the Court Teams (PECTs) project. PECT representatives discussed what county court judges in their respective circuits are doing in terms of public outreach and education. The meeting allowed county judges in each circuit to exchange ideas and information in order to encourage active participation by all county judges. The campaign to educate the public about the role of the courts is one of the judges’ most important functions, according to co-chairs Miami-Dade County Judge Beth Bloom and Pinellas County Judge Patrick Caddell. “The county judges have had a long-standing tradition of reaching out to educate the community,” said Bloom. “The purpose of PECT is to share ideas, resources and creativity so that we can continue to reach out to the community to educate them about the court system, the independence of the judiciary, and the workings of the courts.” “We have been reaching out to educate the community for some time now, and this is an opportunity to place under one umbrella all the programs county judges have been doing with other groups,” she said. Second Circuit: Judge Augustus Aikens said the circuit currently has two components to its PECT program: school/civic speakers and communications. Judges in the circuit provide instruction to schoolchildren and civic organizations on the basic concepts and values of the legal system, and the PECT has taken steps to provide wider distribution of the circuit’s newsletter to schools and civic organizations. Third Circuit: One of the most unusual initiatives in the circuit is the Citizens’ Police Academy in Suwannee County, reported Judge William Slaughter II. He also hosts a live radio show broadcast once a month from his chambers. “I’ve discovered the public has a real thirst for knowledge about the court system,” he noted. The circuit, like the other reporting circuits, schedules judges to speak at schools and civic organizations. In addition, the circuit runs a teen court, a twice per year family law lecture at a local high school, and the Suwannee County Courthouse hosts classes of fourth and fifth grade students each year. Fourth Circuit: Judge Pauline Drayton-Harris reported that although the PECT program isn’t formally initiated in Duval County yet, the judges actively participate in public education through speaking engagements. The program proposal was “well-received and the judges were excited about it,” she commented. Sixth Circuit: The circuit has aid from the well-established local bar associations, making media and public relations much easier, said Judge Robert Morris. The courts are very active with the Law Day and Great American Teach-In programs, sending judges to area schools during the events to speak about the judiciary. Each school in Pinellas County has a volunteer coordinator, according to Morris, who regularly calls on the judges for assistance. In addition, a local law firm has its own public access television show that involves the judges as guests. Plans are also in the works to provide joint presentations with area legislators to discuss the relationship between the judiciary and the legislature. As several other circuit representatives noted, Morris expressed a reticence to get involved with the media in his circuit, noting “it’s like shoving your head in the mouth of a lion.” Eighth Circuit: Judge Phyllis Kotey has received direct help from the Court Administrator’s Public Information Officer and local bar associations in organizing speaking engagements for area judges. The courts regularly host fifth grade students for mock trials, which has become a tradition in the circuit, as well as running a teen court for older students. Kotey also hosts a television show in conjunction with PBS and the University of Florida called “Law Matters,” which features judges, lawyers, and litigants discussing current cases and issues. One of the most successful public outreach initiatives in the circuit is the production of videos to show to pro se litigants before trials. The videos, covering topics such as small claims and divorce, are available to schools and legal professionals throughout the state. Ninth Circuit: As in the eighth circuit, the ninth circuit PECT program has help from the Court Administrator’s Public Information Officer, who sends out news releases and deals directly with the media, noted Judge C. Jeffery Arnold, which “makes the media people more comfortable.” Ninth Circuit judges regularly speak to Girl Scout and Cub Scout troops and at schools for Law Day, and Arnold said that their focus is “primarily at the elementary school level.” The court also has two open forum programs that are videotaped and regularly appear on the local PBS television station. The programs discuss what’s going on in the courthouse and popular issues such as jury service, collection court, and the guardian ad litem program. They were established about a year and a half ago. Contrary to what many other circuit representatives said, certain judges in the ninth circuit have welcomed the media into their courtrooms. One judge holds an “adoption day” in which the judge presides over several adoptions and encourages members of print and TV media to cover the event. Another judge invites a media representative to sit on the bench with him while he sentences felons, to give the public a better understanding of the process. Tenth Circuit: Judge Olin Shinholser reported that judges in his circuit have worked diligently to establish a rapport with the media during noncontroversial times, so when a controversial situation arises, members of the media are less likely to “attack” the judges. He also noted that several judges have been profiled in area newspapers. In Highlands County, where Shinholser presides, all fourth grade students come to the courthouse as part of their curriculum. Shinholser said he personally answers all of the students’ questions, either during their visit to the courthouse or afterwards by personal letter. Judges in the circuit also speak at schools and civic organizations. Eleventh Circuit: The Office of Government Liaison and Public Information has provided a full-time public information director to assist county court judges in the circuit with media relations. Judge Carroll Kelly noted that over 40 judges have volunteered for the circuit’s speakers counsel, which has sent letters to civic groups and schools offering their services. The judges also regularly participate in Law Week activities. The circuit has a plethora of plans in the works, including increasing the amount of court information available online, starting self-help centers for pro se litigants, and preparing for a “media day.” Thirteenth Circuit: Judge Walter Heinrich said that Hillsborough County utilizes its public information officer to send out press releases and handle information requests from the media. The judges themselves have assembled a cadre of informational and educational outlets, including an educational video of a day in Heinrich’s courtroom and law day speeches. Fourteenth Circuit: The clerk of court’s office is a valuable resource for judges in the circuit with regard to media contacts, said Judge Robert Brown. The clerk’s office contacts the media every time a judge has a speaking engagement. He noted that the circuit has programs in place similar to the other circuits, but Bay County is lagging in their public outreach programs. This stems from the resignation of one county judge, leaving an unusual amount of work for the remaining two judges until a replacement can be named. Fifteenth Circuit: Palm Beach County has one of the most well-established public outreach programs in the state, according to Judge Krista Marx. The courthouse boasts a fully-staffed pro se self-help center that provides “do-it-yourself” legal documents for a nominal fee. The county also holds several mock trials per year, offers a two-hour tour of the courthouse for kids which follows the entire system from arrest to the Juvenile Detention Center. The circuit has also produced a small claims video and several public service announcements. The latter is shown regularly on local television stations. Marx noted that local judges focus primarily on educating students, though keeping everyone informed is an ongoing issue. Sixteenth Circuit: Judge Ruth Becker has set up a meeting with the superintendent of schools, county mayors, the public defender’s office, and the local bar president to discuss and plan how the court can best act as a resource to the community. Becker noted that many of the programs in the circuit mirror those found in other circuits, such as Law Day activities, tours of the courthouse for fourth grade students, and a pro se self-help center. The judges also receive help from a public information officer and are looking into setting up a speakers bureau in the circuit. One unusual aspect of the circuit’s campaign is Becker’s involvement with “Take Your Daughter to Work Day.” For the past few years, she has had high school girls come and sit on the bench with her, and she has organized a luncheon for all the mentors and girls. Eighteenth Circuit: Judge David Silverman commented that the circuit has many of the same programs found in other circuits (speakers bureau, mock trials, teen court) and employs the assistance of a public information officer to handle media inquiries. The most innovative approach Silverman has taken was his idea for “court on the road” in which he held a trial at a local community college. Three television stations were present at the event. Silverman is also working with the court technology officer to put judges’ schedules online for public viewing. He noted the PECT program in his circuit is informal and still in the planning stages, but the judges are interested in becoming more involved. Twentieth Circuit: Unlike many of the other circuits, judges in the twentieth circuit have made it a point to become very active in their local bar association. County judges serve on several committees within the bar, including the Law Week Committee and the Education Committee, said Judge Edward Voltz. Local judges speak to community groups on a regular basis and participate in teen court and moot court programs. The court provides an informative website, publications on domestic violence and small claims, and tours of the courthouse for students. A program directed at seniors in high school is one of the circuit’s most widely-publicized initiatives, along with several TV spots that appear on local networks. Judge Caddell, the PECT co-chair, noted that Florida county judges take pride in their work to increase public confidence in the judiciary. “I would call the enthusiasm of the county judges remarkable were it not for the fact that remarkable enthusiasm seems to be common among county judges,” he said. “As we have undertaken the task of formally establishing the PECT model statewide, one of the most striking things I have learned is how many of our fellow county judges are already devoting thousands of hours to various community programs that fit the PECT concept.” “All of these activities help to educate the public and increase public confidence in our justice system, and that is what PECT is all about,” Caddell said. “After all, we should all always bear in mind two things: we serve the public; and knowledge is power. The more knowledge people have about our system, the more empowered they become. The more empowered people are, the more likely they are to have confidence that the justice system works for them instead of the other way around.” County judges work to coordinate education efforts April 1, 2001 Assistant Editor Regular Newslast_img read more

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Search Resumes in Lake Ronkonkoma for Missing Kayaker

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Suffolk County police continued to search for a missing kayaker Friday morning, and banned swimming at all beaches near Lake Ronkonkoma as they tried to locate the man who was last seen Thursday afternoon. A police spokeswoman said there was nothing new to report other than the swimming ban. She did not know what time the search resumed. Police began looking for the kayaker after receiving a 911 call from witnesses who spotted a distressed kayaker in Lake Ronkonkoma, off of Lake Shore Drive around 3:30 p.m. Thursday, police said. The man, who was not identified, was calling for help, police said. Several Good Samaritans attempted to help but eventually lost sight of him. Officers from the Suffolk County Marine Bureau, Emergency Service Section, Aviation Section and Parks police responded, as did several fire departments, authorities said. The search was suspended Thursday evening due to darkness.last_img read more

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The top complaint

first_img 10SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Back in law school, we all had to take a professional responsibility class. The course dealt with the legal practice, and what our responsibilities were to the client.As part of the class, we learned how attorneys can get into hot water with their clients.The problems develop when attorneys “mis-use” client money. When they make legal mistakes. When they miss deadlines.But what was the top complaint? continue reading »last_img

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Why are some S. Koreans who recovered from the coronavirus testing positive again?

first_imgSouth Korean health officials are investigating several possible explanations for a small but growing number of recovered coronavirus patients who later test positive for the virus again.Among the main possibilities are re-infection, a relapse, or inconsistent tests, experts say.South Korea had reported 141 such cases as of Thursday, according to the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC). Topics : Re-infection or relapse? Although re-infection would be the most concerning scenario because of its implications for developing immunity population, both the KCDC and many experts say this is unlikely.Instead, the KCDC says it is leaning toward some kind of relapse or “re-activation” in the virus.A relapse could mean that parts of the virus go into some kind of dormant state for a time, or that some patients may have certain conditions or weak immunity that makes them susceptible to the virus reviving in their system, experts said.center_img A recent study by doctors in China and the United States suggested the new coronavirus can damage T lymphocytes, also known as T cells, which play a central role the body’s immune system and ability to battle infections.Kim Jeong-ki, a virologist at the Korea University College of Pharmacy, compared a relapse after treatment to a spring that snaps back after being pressed down.”When you press down a spring it becomes smaller, then when you take your hands off, the spring pops up,” he said.Even if the patients are found to have relapsed rather than to have been re-infected, it could signal new challenges for containing the spread of the virus.”South Korean health authorities still haven’t found cases where the ‘reactivated’ patients spread the virus to third parties, but if such infectiousness is proven, that would be a huge problem,” said Seol Dai-wu, an expert in vaccine development and a professor at Chung-Ang University.Limits of testing Patients in South Korea are considered clear of the virus when they have tested negative twice in a 48-hour period.While the RT-PCR tests used in South Korea are considered generally accurate, experts said that there are ways they could return false or inconsistent results for a small number of cases.”RT-PCR tests boast an accuracy of 95%. This means that there still can be 2-5% of those cases that are detected false negative or false positive cases,” Kim said.Remnants of the virus could remain at levels too low to be detected by a given test, Seol said.On the other hand, the tests may also be so sensitive that they are picking up small, potentially harmless levels of the virus, leading to new positive results even though the person has recovered, Kwon Jun-wook, deputy director of KCDC said at a briefing on Tuesday.The tests could also be compromised if the necessary samples are not collected properly, said Eom Joong-sik, professor of infectious diseases at Gachon University Gil Medical Centre. last_img read more

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ADNOC awards project management consultancy deal to Penspen

first_imgEngineering and management services provider Penspen has been awarded a project management consultancy (PMC) framework agreement from the Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC).Penspen CEO Peter O’Sullivan; Source: PenspenPenspen said on Monday that the framework agreement was for the provision of PMC services covering a wide range of requirements on a call-off basis and the supervision of ADNOC’s contractors globally.It will serve all ADNOC Group companies, catering to the upstream, midstream, and downstream segment.According to the company, the agreement will cover PMC contracts for all stages of the project lifecycle, including the global supervision of front end engineering and design (FEED) contractors, engineering, procurement, and construction contractors and licensors.Penspen added that the agreement was set up to support ADNOC’s continuing growth plans for the Middle East and Africa. The agreement will run for four years, with an optional two-year extension.Peter O’Sullivan, Penspen’s CEO, said: “We are honored to have been awarded this significant contract from ADNOC which enables the effective supervision of the company’s contractors globally.”Spotted a typo? Have something more to add to the story? Maybe a nice photo? Contact our editorial team via email. Also, if you’re interested in showcasing your company, product or technology on Offshore Energy Today, please contact us via our advertising form where you can also see our media kit.last_img read more

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