Coal India plans an IPO

first_img More From Our Partners Russell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgFeds seized 18 devices from Rudy Giuliani and his employees in April raidnypost.com Sunday 12 September 2010 11:33 pm Share whatsapp KCS-content Show Comments ▼ Coal India plans an IPO Tags: NULL Coal India hopes to raise up to Rs150bn (£2.1bn) from the sale of a 10 per cent stake. That would make its initial public offering bigger than India’s largest completed listing, the $3bn offering of domestic electricity producer Reliance Power in early 2008. Citigroup, Morgan Stanley, Kotak Mahindra Capital, Enam Securities, Deutsche Bank, and Bank of America-Merrill Lynch are managing the IPO, according to reports. whatsapplast_img read more

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Stats snaps up Perform to create data giant

first_img US sports data giant Stats has struck a deal to acquire Perform, the digital sports media and content provider that operates the Opta, RunningBall and Watch&Bet services for gaming industry partners and sports media companies.The value of the deal, which is expected to close in the second half of 2019, was not disclosed.Perform Group changed its name to DAZN Group in October and separated its online-streaming and B2B units with the creation of the Perform Content division, paving the way for a likely spin-off.Vista Equity Partners has helped to fund the fund the transaction, with DAZN set to receive a combination of cash and a minority shareholding in the newly formed company. PJT Partners served as exclusive financial advisor to DAZN and Perform for the deal.Perform Content posted a 41% increase in turnover to £278m in the 12 months through to December 2017.The merger has been announced just days after Perform sealed an agreement to become an authorised betting data distributor in the US for North America’s Major League Baseball.Perform already collects and distributes data from various other major sports league from around the world via its RunningBall fast data service, including football’s English Premier League and LaLiga in Spain.In February, Perform unveiled Bet365 and SkyBet as the launch partners for its new Opta Fast Player Statistics Feed real-time data service.Simon Denyer, the chief executive of Perform’s parent company, DAZN Group, said that all net proceeds from the deal would be invested into DAZN, which operates streaming services in various markets worldwide, as well as other online assets such as the football-dedicated website Goal.com.Stats CEO Carl Mergele was keen to stress the opportunity to establish a new entity that will aim to break new ground in technological innovation.“Bringing Perform into the fold will create the most advanced artificial intelligence company in sports, providing deeper, more robust data and insights, which is essential to our global partners,” he said.“Not only will we be able to improve our offerings to existing customers, we now have the opportunity to expand our presence in global markets where Perform has paved inroads for years as a leader in digital sports content.”Perform was previously listed on the London Stock Exchange before returning to the hands of previous owner Access Industries, the privately-owned industrials group controlled by Len Blavatnik.“The combination of STATS and Perform creates a powerful opportunity as the experience of sports for consumers continues to evolve,” Blavatnik said.Vista Equity Partners founder, chairman and CEO Robert Smith added: “Stats and Perform are two exceptional, highly complementary companies with extensive backgrounds as industry innovators that will deliver superior products to customers as one combined entity.” Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter 15th April 2019 | By contenteditor Stats snaps up Perform to create data giant Topics: Finance Sports betting Finance US sports data giant Stats has struck a deal to acquire Perform, the digital sports media and content provider that operates the Opta, RunningBall and Watch&Bet services for gaming industry partners and sports media companies. Email Addresslast_img read more

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General Convention to consider new approach to Israel-Palestine issues promoting…

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis June 9, 2018 at 10:13 am Need to edit to ‘made aware of what was and wasn’t acceptable’ and to add that I and other colleagues have messed up on cultural norms – one thing I did recently was to eat in public around Muslims fasting during Ramadan, and that’s just rude. Director of Music Morristown, NJ A Palestinian woman makes her way June 1 through an Israeli checkpoint in Bethlehem in the occupied West Bank to attend Friday prayer of the holy fasting month of Ramadan in Jerusalem’s Al-Aqsa Mosque. Photo: Reuters[Episcopal News Service] A group of bishops and deputies who were asked to find a way to navigate the often-thorny discussions of Episcopal Church policy toward Israel and Palestine has announced its recommendations for fostering open and productive debate on those issues at General Convention this July.Five bishops and five members of the House of Deputies served on the Israel and Palestine Working Group, which was formed last year by Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, House of Deputies president. Curry and Jennings have accepted the working group’s three core recommendations, according to an email to members of the two houses sent May 31 by the Rev. Michael Barlowe, General Convention’s executive officer.“Members of the working group were not asked to guide General Convention in any particular way on the underlying issues, about which members have various points of view,” Barlowe said. Instead, the 10 members issued the following recommendations to enable “a prayerful, thoughtful and respectful engagement that facilitates genuine discernment”:All members of the House of Bishops and House of Deputies are encouraged to review a resource list assembled by the working group. The list includes suggested reading on issues related to Israeli-Palestinian relations and background about the Episcopal Church’s past engagement on those issues.Each house agrees to take up these issues through a “special order of business,” which will allow hearings and discussions to take place early in General Convention and ensure debate isn’t sidelined by procedural barriers. (See page 204 here for more on the special order of business.)The House of Deputies will be the house of initial action for each resolution pertaining to Israel and Palestine.“I am so grateful to the task force for their work,” Curry said in an emailed statement. “Their work will make it possible for the convention to have a thoughtful, prayerful discussion and consideration of the humanitarian concerns in Israel Palestine. In so doing may we pray and work for the peace of Jerusalem.”Jennings alluded to the challenges ahead in a written statement.“We’ve got some hard conversations about the Holy Land ahead of us at General Convention,” she said. “I’m grateful to the deputies and bishops of the Israel and Palestine Working Group for recommending a structure that will help us have those conversations in ways that are respectful, substantive and representative of the wide range of Episcopalians’ experiences and opinions.”Beginning the debate in the House of Deputies, which is a larger and more diverse body, will help ensure a broader debate, said the Rev. Brian Grieves, a member of the House of Deputies who served on the Israel and Palestine Working Group. Both houses have an interest in moving this debate forward.Underlying the working group’s deliberations was the imperative to “have a discussion that is open and respectful and transparent in the process,” Grieves told Episcopal News Service. “Because there have been concerns in the past that it has not been. Things got bottled up in committees.”General Convention has voted in support of Middle East peace for decades; however, the question of whether to apply more forceful economic pressure on Israel for its occupation of the Palestinian Territories has been a hot-button issue in recent years. In 2012, the bishops joined deputies in approving a resolution in favor of “positive investment” in the region as part of a show of support for peace among Jews, Muslims and Christians in the Holy Land, but the two houses were unable to agree on a second resolution calling for greater engagement in corporate social responsibility through the church’s investment portfolio.At General Convention in 2015, a resolution calling on the church to divest from companies engaged in certain business with Israel failed in a vote of the House of Bishops, which meant it never made it to the House of Deputies for consideration.Grieves, who is a member of the Stewardship and Socially Responsible Investing legislative committee in the House of Deputies, said the church already participates in corporate engagement related to Israel and Palestine based on a 2005 report by what was then known as the Executive Council’s Social Responsibility in Investments committee. That report was endorsed by Executive Council, and the results can be seen this year in church-backed shareholder resolutions seeking to influence Motorola and Caterpillar, two companies that have contracts with the Israeli government.“I think corporate engagement has been very good, but I do think here may be a point where we as a church would end our complicity in continuing to work with these companies,” Grieves said. “I don’t know when that point should be reached. I think we need to do some careful thinking about that, and that’s part of the discussion that’s going to happen at convention.”Numerous General Convention resolutions are expected on topics related to Israel and Palestine by the time the gathering gets underway on July 5 in Austin, Texas. At least three have been submitted so far, including one proposed by the Diocese of California that reintroduces a push for divestment from “those companies that profit from Israel’s occupation of Palestinian lands or whose products or actions support the infrastructure of the occupation.”Corporate engagement won’t be the only topic related to the Holy Land. Two additional proposed resolutions call for greater attention to the plight of Palestinian children, including those being tried in Israeli military courts.The Israeli-Palestinian conflict should eventually generate a greater diversity of resolutions at this General Convention, said Sarah Lawton, who chairs the Social Justice and International Policy committee for the House of Deputies. That variety is related to the number of big developments in the region in recent years, from the breakdown of the peace process to global outrage at the Trump administration moving the U.S. embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.In the past, General Convention has sometimes debated single larger resolutions addressing multiple aspects of the conflict together, making it difficult to move forward on individual measures, but Lawton said this time should be different. “It’s not just one big resolution going forward but a number of them,” said Lawton, who also was a member of the Israel and Palestine Working Group.Bishop Barry Beisner, another member of the working group, has submitted a resolution seeking to reaffirm the church’s stance in support of Jerusalem as an open city, where Christians, Muslims and Jews have free access to the city’s holy sites. He doesn’t expect that resolution to generate much controversy, but “there’s a broad spectrum of opinion on any number of related issues.”Beisner emphasized the value in the list of resources assembled by the working group, to help General Convention prepare for those discussions. And the bishops aren’t giving up their voice by agreeing to start deliberations in the House of Deputies, he said.“It will help to expedite the consideration of these resolutions to have them all under that one tent initially,” said Beisner, who serves on the Social Justice and International Policy committee.With so many issues at stake, Lawton thinks people on all sides of these debates have an interest in avoiding the procedural pratfalls that can lead to inaction.“We’ve had a hard time with this conversation [about Israel and Palestine]. One of the ways that it was hard was played out in the process,” she said. “These are important issues, and we should be able to speak to them and not feel afraid to say something.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] June 7, 2018 at 11:20 pm Israel is a legitimate state and it is not going to go away despite the wishes of a select group of people. Israel needs security, Palestinians need to live in dignity. Palestinians include Christians and supporting their just cause is not being anti-Semite or anti-Israel.The ongoing conflict between Palestine and Israel very much impacts the lives of the people in the Middle East and indirectly/directly those outside Middle East. Not surprisingly many organizations including the Episcopal Church wish and are working towards a peaceful resolution. As I understand the BDS movement played a role in changing the apartheid policies of South African govt. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET mike geibel says: Kristie Raynor says: June 8, 2018 at 11:48 pm C’mon Donna Hicks, have the guts to say that you were addressing me, Larry Waters. We were on a tour and were made aware of things that were acceptable and not acceptable. And yes we listened and adhered to all the cautions. Furthermore, this was not just a random woman that I had my arm around, it was my wife. And no I was not hugging her either. Perhaps if someone shoves a rifle in your face, you have may a little more empathy for the victim [you]. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Comments (22) Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group June 5, 2018 at 7:45 pm I’m not sure what the question is in all of this. If a bunch of people bought most of the houses in South Dakota away from absentee landlords and then, as new owners, evicted legitimate squatters (rightful owners), and declared it a new state apart from America, it would be obvious. You can’t just buy a nation out from under the feet of its citizens. I don’t think it should matter how many parcels Zionists bought, who won what battle, or the tactics the Palestinians who fought against them used before they lost. It shouldn’t even matter how the Palestinians have fought since. Israel is an illegitimate state. Israel is an illegitimate state.Nothing Palestine has done or will do will change that. You don’t need to look at the morality of desperate Palestinians to gauge this. Israel is a well funded ethnostate machine that will not stop building settlements where they know they should not be. Israel keeps people poor, trapped, and without means. Jews, Muslims, and Christians all lived in Palestine until the religiously intolerant state of Israel took that away. Israel, the state, must fall so, actual Israel, can be the people of God again.I’d say the view for Episcopalians should be clear, but really, it shouldn’t be just us that this is blatantly clear to. What people need a glass of water and which people want help cutting off an ear? Who are we called to serve? Earl B Curtis says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS General Convention, John Michael Povey says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing June 6, 2018 at 8:45 am It’s important to be aware of cultural norms when we’re visiting other cultures and countries. When I worked in Hebron doing human rights monitoring, hazardous accompaniment and violence reduction work, as an international and a woman, I dressed modestly but not so I was dressed as an Israeli Jewish settler woman or as a Palestinian Muslim woman – trousers (not tight-fitting), and a shirt which reached past my hips and sleeves which covered my elbows. Also we didn’t hug men in public. Anthony Vaccaro says: June 8, 2018 at 8:45 am Dear Ms. Raynor: The tenor and venom of your response displays your hatred for the Jews of Israel. No condemnation of the murders and atrocities committed by Hamas and others is found in the TEC denunciations of Israel. No denunciation of the efforts by Arab States to murder millions of Israelis ever escapes the lips of BDS supporters. Under Sharia Law, unmarried fornicators are to be whipped, adulterers are to be stoned to death, and homosexuals must be executed. Quran (2:191-193) – “And kill them wherever you find them, and turn them out from where they have turned you out.”Quran (9:30) – “And the Jews say: Ezra is the son of Allah; and the Christians say: The Messiah is the son of Allah; these are the words of their mouths; they imitate the saying of those who disbelieved before; may Allah destroy them; how they are turned away!” I choose to divest from the Episcopal Church. mike geibel says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab June 5, 2018 at 10:17 pm Something outside of the box like a two state one nation solution is going to be requred if a fix is ever devised for this.Each state with complete autonomy in its own affairs and a federal organ to handle external affairsl.Tricky for sure.In fact Revelations hints that only the return of Christ will solve this centuries old dilemma Larry Waters says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA Jen Finesilver says: Middle East John Hobart says: Rector Martinsville, VA June 7, 2018 at 12:38 pm That is absolutely false. Every time Episcopalians or Presbyterians speak out against the barbarism of the Israeli government, we are accused of being antisemitic. It is nothing but propaganda to hide the multitude of sins being committed by corrupt israeli officials and military. We should divest from companies which support these massive human rights violations, and make it clear that those actions are not to be tolerated. June 6, 2018 at 12:02 am Some years ago, my wife and I were in Jerusalem near the Dome of the Rock mosque. As it was cold, I had my arm around my wife. Suddenly, four armed men stormed down a sidewalk, from the mosque, toward us, shouting, waving their weapons. After some tense moments, one of the men with a rifle, said in broken English that we must be Americans and Christian and that we were being disrespectful to Islam. The men did not like my arm around my wife. And people wonder why peace is so elusive. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Joe Prasad says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC Submit an Event Listing Joe Prasad says: Rector Belleville, IL Rector Collierville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Vicki Gray says: June 5, 2018 at 8:41 pm At last! At long last…an opportunity to look clearly at the injustice and suffering confronting us, to talk honestly about it, and act courageously to end it.. When the suffering ends, security will follow. When justice begins, peace will follow.God bless all who participated in these deliberations. I look forward to joining the conversation in Austin. Israel-Palestine, June 9, 2018 at 8:19 am Larry, I was making a general comment, not addressing you – a reasonable thing to factor in when traveling of which all of us may not be aware. It’s good you were made aware of what and wasn’t acceptable. I have had rifles in my face and I have been caught in crossfire and teargassed and had percussion grenades tossed towards me. It’s not comfortable and it’s scary. Youth Minister Lorton, VA By David PaulsenPosted Jun 5, 2018 June 5, 2018 at 7:05 pm new paths must be found. what’s been done in the many past & lost decades has led to nothing good. Israelis are still not fully secure, & Palestinians still suffer, … greatly. balanced discussions & policies have rarely happened. one factor missing is actual factual learning of how this tragedy began. i am sick of people who can only focus on the latest stone being thrown, or whatever. WHY was that stone thrown. how many decades led to that stone being thrown. the suffering must end, but righteous people must demand it. not enough righteous people, perhaps. tragic, & disgusting. June 6, 2018 at 8:14 pm The Episcopal Church is the proven enemy of Israel. The Anti-Semitic BDS movement (boycott, divest and sanction) is and always will be a failure because it it ignores the truth that Israelis cannot—nothing short of total annihilation of all Jews and the de-legitimization of the sovereign country of Israel will satisfy the Palestinians, Hamas and the BDS supporters. As reflected in some comments to this article and in previous ENS articles, the efforts of various anti-Israel hate groups have but one goal: to demonize, isolate, and ultimately destroy the Jewish state through political and economic warfare. “Open debates” will not deter or even temper those who insist on the destruction of Israel.Some dissenting members may react with calls to “boycott the boycotters.” Boycotts will change the agenda of anti-Israel clergy no more than punitive boycotts will compel Israelis to surrender to Hamas. But dissenting congregants will leave the Episcopal Church over this divisive debate, along with their pledge money and bequests. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ June 8, 2018 at 8:24 pm It is the BDS movement which is Anti-Israel and Anti-Semitic. The BDS supporters do not want a peaceful resolution—they seek to weaken and destroy Israel. In the past, the General Convention has supported recognition of the State of Israel and its right to be secure within its borders. (Acts of Convention, 1988-D0530) In the ensuring years a growing faction within the Church has become radical and strident on participating in an anti-Israel economic war under the false premise that this would promote peace talks. (Acts of Convention, 2012-B019; Divestment Resolution D060). Recent proclamations from the Church have denounced and blamed Israel, and Israel alone, for deaths resulting from violent protests in Gaza and the West Bank and have selectively eliminated facts and video clips showing the violent and reprehensible acts by Palestinians protestors. (Using children as human shields)A 2013 Executive Council Coordinating Committee report from the TEC stated “this Church does not support boycott, divestment, and economic sanctions against the state of Israel nor any application of the Church’s corporate-engagement policies toward such ends.” In 2015, the Church wisely chose to reject the demands of radical BDS advocates. When churches or nations are perceived to condemn only Israel, then it is fair to identify them as aligned with those whom they vocally and financially support. The following chronology of some of the acts of murder and terrorism by radical Palestinians are not to be found in the “resource list” referenced in the ENS article: • Kiryat Shmona massacre: April 11, 1974—Israel Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine –18 killed, 8 victims were children; 15 injured.• Ma’alot massacre: May 14, 1974–Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine–29 killed, 68 injured; mostly children.• Coastal Road massacre: March 11, 1978–near Tel Aviv Palestinian Liberation Organization–38 people were killed on bus, including 13 children. Other people were killed nearby. 71 wounded.• Dizengoff Street bus bombing: October 19 1994–Tel Aviv, Hamas Suicide bomber blows himself up in a bus during the morning rush hour–Killing 22 people and injuring 50 others.• Beit Lid massacre: January 22, 1995–Palestinian Islamic Jihad–23 killed, including 2 perpetrators; 69 were injured.• Island of Peace massacre: March 13, 1997–Jordanian Army Corporal Ahmed Daqamseh opened fire on a large group of Israeli schoolgirls–19 were killed.• Sbarro restaurant massacre: August 9, 2001—Jerusalem, Hamas killed 15 and 130 were injured; 7 victims were children.• Dolphinarium discotheque massacre : June 1, 2001–Tel Aviv, Hamas killed 21 and more than 100 are wounded.• Bat Mitzvah massacre: 18 January 2002—In Hadera, the Fatah al-Aqsa Martyrs’ Brigades kill 7 and wound 33.• Yeshivat Beit Yisrael massacre: March 2, 2002–Beit Yisrael, Jerusalem, the Fatah al-Aqsa Martyrs’ Brigades kill 11, including 7 children, 2 of which were infants• Passover massacre: March 27, 2001– In Netanya, Hamas kills 30 and 140 are injured; some victims were Holocaust survivors; considered the deadliest single attack against Israeli civilians during the Second Intifada.• Tel-Aviv central bus station massacre: January 5, 2003—In Southern Tel Aviv, the Fatah al-Aqsa Martyrs’ Brigade kills 23 and over 100 injured.• Mercaz HaRav massacre: March 6, 2008—In Kiryat Moshe, Jerusalem, Arab gunman, Alaa Abu Dhein kills 8 at a school; 7en victims were students.• 2014 Jerusalem synagogue massacre : November 8, 2014–InHar Nof, Jerusalem Uday Abu Jamal and Ghassan Abu Jamal attack against a synagogue. Four rabbis and a police officer were killed.• June 2016 Tel Aviv shooting: June 8, 2016—At a Sarona market, Tel Aviv, Khalid al-Mahmara and Muhammad Mahmara attack restaurant guests in downtown Tel Aviv, killing four innocent civilians. In the First Intifada, a total of 160 Israelis and 2,162 Palestinians were killed, including 1,000 Palestinians killed by other Palestinians under the accusation of being collaborators. In the Second Intifada (2000–2005), it is estimated that 1,137 Israelis were killed by Palestinians. More recently, 500 Israeli civilians were killed by Palestinians from September 29, 2000, to March 31, 2012, in Israel, and another 254 Israeli civilians were killed in the Gaza Strip and the West Bank.And let us also not forget that in 1967, Palestinian Arab Christian Sirhan Sirhan assassinated (murdered) presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy. Robert Kennedy’s crime? He had supported the sale of bombers to Israel.What are the Palestinian demands for Peace that BDS will help achieve?Yasser Arafat, in 1970 stated: “Our basic aim is to liberate the land from the Mediterranean Seas to the Jordan River. We are not concerned with what took place in June 1967 or in eliminating the consequences of the June war. The Palestinian revolution’s basic concern is the uprooting of the Zionist entity from our land and liberating it.”Current President Mahmoud Abbas and his chief negotiator Saeb Erekat continue to deny Israel’s right to exist and promote vicious hatred against Jews. The state-controlled Palestinian media routinely praises the murders committed by Palestinians. Abbas al-Sayed who perpetrated the Passover suicide attack at the Park Hotel in Netanya which killed 30 civilians was described by President Abbas as a “hero” and “symbol of the Palestinian Authority.” When Israel agreed to hand over the bodies of dead Palestinian suicide bombers (who murdered 23, including children) in a humanitarian gesture to help the peace process, the Palestinian Authority held a national rally to honor them. The Temple Mount is home to the Al-Aqsa Mosque, the third holiest site in Islam. Israelis took control of the Temple Mount as a result of the 1967 war and it remains within their sovereignty, but Israel respectfully agreed and enforce the rule that only Muslims are allowed to enter the Mosque. In September 2015, Palestinian leaders spread false rumors that the Israelis planned to change the status of the Mosque, and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas incited the “stabbing intifada,” by stating on Palestinian television: “We welcome every drop of blood spilled in Jerusalem” and, as to the Al-Aqsa Mosque, Jews “have no right to dirty it with their filthy feet.” Innocent Jews were stabbed in the streets of Jerusalem. Hamas leaders and Palestinian President Masoud Abbas are NOT heroes in the mold of Nelson Mandela or Mahatma Gandhi. Comparisons between the religious civil war in the Middle East with Apartheid in South Africa or the British presence in India are insulting to the legacy of these true heroes of peace and non-violent protest. It is not morally just, but morally accursed, to use economic sanctions to force Israel to negotiate with Palestinian leaders who support murder and who steadfastly demand the destruction of Israel. In 2014, the Presbyterian Church USA and the United Church of Christ passed resolutions to boycott and divest from companies they decided were “complicit” in the Jewish State’s alleged misdeeds against Palestinians. In 2016, internal reports from the PCUSA forecast it would lose more than 400,000 members in the next half-a-decade. In 2015 and 2016, ECUSA membership reports showed a loss of 36,000 and 35,000 members respectively. Since the 2016 Election, the TEC leadership has contributed to a continuing loss of members with their divisive and strident partisan agenda on national political issues. By adding anti-Israel resolutions, there should be no surprise that pews continue to empty. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Donna Hicks says: Rector Albany, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York June 6, 2018 at 12:57 pm Amen. June 7, 2018 at 7:30 am Thank you Mike for the courage to speak the truth. The Israeli / Palestinian conflict has been going on for over a half a century. I don’t know what the EC thinks its going to accomplish with this effort except further dividing Episcopalians as you mention. Its a total waste of time and money that would be better spent figuring out how to stop the violence in cites like Detroit, St. Louis, Baltimore and the rest. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT S.R.Price says: Submit a Press Release June 5, 2018 at 8:22 pm Given the diminishing size, limited resources and diversity of opinion in the Episcopal Church, it seems unlikely to me that anything we do will have any impact on the Israel-Palestine situation. Maybe there are better ways we could use our time. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Bath, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Advocacy Peace & Justice, June 6, 2018 at 1:56 pm Amen General Convention 2018, June 7, 2018 at 11:14 pm Israel is a legitimate country and is not going to go away despite the wishes of a select group of people. Israel needs security, Palestinians need to lead a life of dignity. Palestinians include Christians and supporting their just causes is not being anti-Semite or anti-Israel.The checkered relationship between Israel and Palestine is a cause for much discomfort in the Middle East and outside the Middle East. And so it is not surprising that many organizations including the Episcopal Church want to see a peaceful resolution to the ongoing conflict between Israel and Palestine. As I understand the BDS movement played a role in changing the apartheid policies of South African government. If BDS movement brings about some positive changes so be it. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH June 7, 2018 at 7:53 pm I will, with others, walk out of an Anti-Semitic Church that Boycotts, Divests, or Sanctions Israel. There are over 6 million Jews in Israel and just how many can we BDS and still maintain that we are holier than them? Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ General Convention to consider new approach to Israel-Palestine issues promoting open debate Larry Waters says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 June 12, 2018 at 12:16 am Larry – I used to hear about South East Asians in Middle Eastern countries being treated rudely for no rhyme or reason. I listened. Then I had my own unpleasant experience not once but three times within a week – immigration, taxi driver, and security staff at a tourist site! The receptionist at Holiday Inn sympathized and educated me a bit about the local culture. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK den mark wichar, Vancouver WA says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET June 13, 2018 at 9:40 am How is working towards peace and a justice that includes ALL inhabitants of Israel and Palestine anti-Semitic? Rather than a knee-jerk response, please educate yourself on the work, the issues and the desired outcomes. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Donna Hicks says: Tags The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group mike geibel says: Joe Prasad says: Comments are closed. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Donna Hicks says: Bill Louis says: D.H. Antenen says: Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

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Solar Bears take on Swamp Rabbits tonight

first_img Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom The Orlando Solar Bears begin a string of 15 consecutive games against South Division opponents, starting with the first of two matches in three nights against the Greenville Swamp Rabbits. Orlando remains unbeaten in regulation on home ice against Greenville this season through three matches, going 1-0-1-1 at the ARS.com Rink at Amway Center.Orlando has added defenseman Kyle Shapiro. Shapiro, 27, was most recently with the Fayetteville FireAntz of the SPHL, where he has posted nine points (2g-7a) and 34 penalty minutes in 15 games. Shapiro also skated in one game with the Indy Fuel this season, and 10 matches with the Pensacola Ice Flyers of the SPHL, where he logged six points (1g-5a) and two penalty minutes in 10 games.Shapiro has also previously skated with the Evansville Icemen of the ECHL and the Columbus Cottonmouths of the SPHL.Prior to turning pro, the native of Ambler, Penn. played four seasons of collegiate hockey for Division III Nichols College, where he recorded 60 points (18g-42a) and 209 penalty minutes in 107 games for the Bison.Darik Angeli’s two-assist outing on Sunday gave the forward a new season-high point streak with the Solar Bears, having amassed a goal and three assists in three games; he now has eight points (4g-4a) over his last nine games for Orlando.Chris Crane also enjoyed a solid performance for Orlando on Sunday, as his two goals matched a season-high with the Solar Bears and set a new personal-best while in the City Beautiful, as he enjoyed a three-point afternoon for the home team.The game begins tonight at 7:00 PM at  the ARS.com Rink at the Amway Center. Fans can watch the game on ECHL.TV or listen on Mixlr.Tickets can be purchased here.Tonight is Thirsty Thursday – Fans can enjoy $5 domestic draft beers throughout the Amway Center. Fans can also take advantage of $2 Coors Light drafts before and after Thursday’s game, along with food specials at Ferg’s Depot on Church Street. Fans can purchase discounted game tickets for as low as $14 at orlandosolarbearshockey.com/fergs. If Orlando scores the first goal of the game, fans can bring their tickets to Ferg’s Depot after the game to receive a free special Solar Bears appetizer with the purchase of a beverage. Please enter your comment! LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply TAGSOrlando Solar Bears Previous articleApopka Weekly Arrest ReportNext articleCity Council denies local business a break on impact fees Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Mama Mia Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter 1 COMMENT February 2, 2017 at 3:42 pmcenter_img UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Please enter your name here Solar Bears and Swamp Rabbits, I love it! Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

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Spring & Summer are about to get super cool: Apopka’s Splash…

first_img Please enter your name here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. The City of Apopka is keeping their online registration open until all the spots are filled for their Summer Camps.This year they have plans for kids to enjoy a wet and wonderful Florida Summer! Whether cooking, playing a game of kickball, or creating a beautiful craft your child is sure to have fun! While they do spend time inside each day, this is an active outdoor-based camp. Personal electronics (including cell phones) are discouraged.Camp at the Fran Carlton CenterMonday through FridayJune 1 through July 30, 20217:30 AM to 5:30 PMat the Fran Carlton Center (11 N. Forest Avenue, Apopka, FL)There will be no camp on July 5, 2021 in observance of Independence Day.For questions please contact Carolyn Ray at [email protected] AgesCamp is for children currently in 1st – 5th grade (must have completed Kindergarten and entering First grade through Fifth grade in the Fall).Camp FeeResidents: $80 per week ($64 on Week 1 and 6)Non-Residents: $100 ($80 on Week 1 and 6)No field trips will take place during Summer Camp 2021RegistrationOnline ONLY. Registration will begin on April 5, 2021 at 8 AM and will continue until all spots are filled. Online registration ONLY.Camp at the Billie Dean Community Center at Alonzo Williams ParkMonday through FridayJune 1 to July 30, 20217:30 AM to 5:30 PMCost: $25at the Billie Dean Community Center at Alonzo Williams Park (225 M A Board Street, Apopka, FL)There will be no camp on July 5, 2021 in observance of Independence Day.Minimum of 5 participants and Maximum of 20 participants.For questions please contact Carolyn Ray at [email protected] Registration InstructionsPlease visit the City’s Recreation website to register for camps under the Youth Activities tab.Online registration ONLY.Login in to your account, new families must create a NEW family profile in CivicRec. Returning families, please use your same family profile from last year & the same account login. After you have logged in or created your family profile, enroll for all the weeks that you need. Payment is required for the first week.Registration AssistanceFor assistance with the online registration process, please call (407) 703-1642Health and Safety InformationTo ensure a safe environment for campers and staff, the City of Apopka will continue to follow Centers for Disease Control and Florida Department of Children and Families recommendations and regulations, which includes limiting the capacity of our summer camps.To accommodate social distancing requirements children will be in groups of no more than 10 assigned to a camp counselor. Total camp enrollment will not exceed 60 campers each week. Camp groups will remain separate throughout the day.Face masks required daily. Staff and campers will be screened with a contact less thermometer before they enter the facility each day.Staff will disinfect common areas and frequently touched surfaces throughout the day.  At the end of each day, staff will deep clean all areas in preparation for the following day.Additional InformationLunch will be provided each day by the Orange County lunch program. You may also pack a lunch from home or snack if you choose to. Kona Ice will visit the camp on Mondays, additional fee applies, please send you child with $3-$5 for Kona Ice.For additional information please call 407-703-1642. Please enter your comment! Apopka’s Splash Pad – PT/Seasonal opening for Splash Pad Attendant TAGSActivitiesCity of ApopkaentertainmentFamilykidsKit Land Nelson ParkOutdoorsPrivate PartyRegistrationRentalsSplash PadSummer Camp Previous articleFL Senate dials back prison-closing plan following warnings about prisons in crisisNext articleApopka’s ‘Hometown Showcase’ rolls out this weekend with more fun, music, food and fireworks Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR The Anatomy of Fear Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 center_img Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here From the City of ApopkaThings are looking up for kids and families in Apopka, with the popular City Splash Pad at Kit Land Nelson Park reopening Saturday, and small group Summer Camp options still available for June and July.The City Splash Pad at Kit Land Nelson ParkWith the heat already sizzling, the Splash Pad’s reopening comes just in time. Filled with an array of super fun super soakers, sprayers and spouts, kids big and small will not want to leave.The Splash Pad will be available on weekends only from April 10 until May 23, 2021, with hours from 9:30am to 5pm. Then the summer fun kicks in! Summer hours begin May 26 and run through August 8, with hours Tuesdays through Sundays from 9:30am to 5pm. Once school is about to begin, the hours return to weekends only, with August 14 through September 26 being the last hurrah of the Splash Pad season, with hours from 9:30am to 5pm.The Splash Pad will be closed on Mondays for maintenance/private rentals.Here’s a little peek at what awaits you:Mega Soaker: Large bucket that drops 40 gallons of water at a time.Sneaky Soaker: Small splash buckets mounted on tall poles with a water shower head.Splash Blasters: Small Water CannonsFun-Guy: Mushroom-shaped sprayer for toddlersFun-Brella: Creates a curtain of waterSpray Tunnel: Sprays water from a series of ground spouts LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter The Splash Pad is also available for private rentals from 5 PM to 7 PM (after public hours), or through the summer on Monday’s during the day. Rental rates are as follows:Residents: $150 plus taxNon-Residents: $200 plus taxNon-Profit: $140 (No tax with tax exempt certificate)The maximum capacity for the Splash Pad is 40 persons. Contact the City of Apopka at 407-703-1742 for more information or to make private rental reservations. City of Apopka Summer Campslast_img read more

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Tesco and ITV offer €˜virtually no incentives’ to help good causes

first_imgNeill Ghosh from intelligentgiving.com said: As far as ethical bonuses are concerned, Tesco’s offering is way below average. Its fixation on one-of donations to its own high-profile charity looks more like PR than a serious incentive to staff to help chariies. Ane employees who want to give regularly should avoid the company’s payroll giving scheme and give by direct debit isntead – otherwise they lose a percentage in admin costs.The 10 top companies for ethical bonuses include Aviva (Norwich Union), Northern Rock, Barclays and British American Tobacco. Northern Rock and Royal Bank of Scotland effectively triple donations made by their employees. The BBC and Aviva both offer six days’ paid volunteering a year, which Ghosh described as ‘extraordinarily generous’.The Index covers 67 of the country’s highest profile employers and covers more than 1.5m employees.  36 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tesco and ITV are two of the worst companies in the UK when it comes to ‘ethical bonuses’ according to a survey by donors’ website Intelligentgiving.com.The site says ‘ethical bonues mean eithe rtopping up employees’ donations to charity or giving paid time off for vounteering. Many companies surveyed in the Ethical Bonus Index 2007 matched regular donations and covered their staff’s payroll giving administration costs. But Tesco offers no incentives for regular giving and even fails to cover the admin costs of its payroll giving scheme. It supports fundraising events for its own charity of the year – currently British Red Cross – with matched donations, but not for any other charities. Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 31 January 2007 | Newscenter_img Tesco and ITV offer €˜virtually no incentives’ to help good causes About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Tagged with: corporatelast_img read more

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Focus Ireland increases income by 17%

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 1 September 2015 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Tagged with: Finance Ireland Research / statistics Homelessness charity Focus Ireland increased its fundraising income by 17% last year, according its latest accounts.Total fundraising income in 2014 was €6.4 million, against €5.4 million in 2013. Total income, which includes grants from government, was €19.6 million, up from €18.3 million in 2013.Focus Ireland operates throughout the country and raises its funds from a mixture of corporate partnerships, events and donor sources. In 2013 it reported that it had nearly 18,000 regular donors. Its main fundraising events are the Four Peaks challenge and the ‘Shine a Light’ Christmas fundraising campaign. The charity has also established a ‘Women’s Philanthropy Circle.’Focus has a number of corporate partnerships, including long running relationships with insurance company Aviva, Marks and Spencer and Supervalu.In 2014 Focus spent €1.9 million on fundraising, up from €1.5 million in 2013. The charity says that it has a principle that fundraising costs should not exceed a 20% ratio but in 2014 the figure was 30%, up from 27% in 2013.Focus had €3.3 million in cash in 2014, down from €5 million the previous year due to increased expenditure on housing developments and fundraising. Focus Ireland increases income by 17%  51 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

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Non-Aligned Movement Summit meets in Venezuela as global capitalist crisis deepens

first_img(bottom L-R) Ecuador’s President Rafael Correa, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, Venezuela’s President Nicolas Maduro, Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas and other presidents, leaders and heads of delegations pose for a photo during the 17th Non-Aligned Summit in Porlamar, Venezuela, September 17, 2016.The Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) held its 17th summit Sept. 17-18, on Margarita Island, in the state of Nueva Esparta, in the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, to mark its 55th anniversary. Its theme was “Peace, Sovereignty and Solidarity for Development.”Over 120 nations attended, including many heads of state, amid a growing economic and security crisis for oil and commodity producing regions. Venezuela has lost revenue due to U.S.- induced overproduction of petroleum resources.Venezuela, Nigeria, Brazil, Angola, Ecuador and other countries are experiencing economic difficulties, which in some cases have resulted in political instability. The United Socialist Party in Venezuela is facing profound challenges to its authority by a U.S.-supported opposition coalition.The summit’s concluding declaration said the nations and governments represented were “mindful of the fact that the history and reality of [today’s] world … demonstrates that it is the developing countries … who suffer more intensely from the disregard of international law, from invasions, from the ravages of war and armed conflicts, caused mostly by the geopolitical interests of the great centers of power, as well as from protracted conflicts inherited from colonialism and neocolonialism.”These words reflect the burgeoning international crisis of internal and external displacement in recent years, which the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees says has reached an unprecedented level.  The UNHCR reports that by the end of 2015, 65.3 million people worldwide had been forced away from their homes. In this population, approximately 21.3 million were refugees; more than half were under the age of 18. (tinyurl.com/zaq2e67)UNHCR also noted: “There are also 10 million stateless people who have been denied a nationality and access to basic rights such as education, health care, employment and freedom of movement. … [Globally], nearly 34,000 people are forcibly displaced every day as a result of conflict or persecution.”Many of the displaced are fleeing Pentagon and NATO instigated wars of conquest and regime change. Additionally, unsustainable economic growth in many African, Asian, Middle Eastern and Latin American states has prompted millions of people to seek employment in North America and Europe. The large influx of people from oppressed nations into world capitalist centers has created social tensions manifested in electoral politics.Right-wing governments and political parties have made substantial gains in industrial states fueling institutional racism, intolerance and violence. Concurrently, these countries in Europe and North America are undergoing structural unemployment and rising poverty rates.Pledge to continue founders’ legacy The NAM grew out of the 1955 Bandung Conference in Indonesia.  That gathering of 29 countries was a response to the growing threat of another world war following World War II.  That period was characterized by U.S. intervention in Korea, French imperialism’s defeat in Vietnam and the beginning of the Algerian people’s armed struggle for national liberation. These developments heightened military and political conflicts between the U.S. and the Soviet Union, then the major global powers.Liberation struggles, anti-colonial movements and political parties aimed to end colonialism and imperialism. The USSR, and later, the People’s Republic of China, sought to ally their foreign policies with peoples aspiring to end colonial and semicolonial rule, as well as those who had gained national independence.By 1961, the need arose for a more permanent organization. In Belgrade, Yugoslavia, then a socialist federation led by Marshal Tito, NAM was founded by leading figures, including Gamal Abdel Nasser of Egypt, Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana, Jawaharlal Nehru of India and Sukarno of Indonesia.The decolonization process in Africa was well underway by then, and the NAM sought to form a bloc of emerging states within the United Nations.Over the last 55 years, NAM has experienced ebbs and flows. Leadership has been held by various countries, including Cuba and Egypt. The Islamic Republic of Iran hosted the previous summit in 2012.Iranian President Hassan Rouhani emphasized at the recent NAM summit: “In today’s global relations, hegemonic and domineering inclinations are incontrovertible reality. Alignment towards military polarizations and blocs is another dominant feature in the mentality and behaviors of some of the players.“Arms race, warmongering, intensification of conflicts and violence, and interfering in the domestic affairs of developing nations by the holders of power and wealth … are only examples of such behavior which cannot be interpreted unless with the logic of hegemony-seeking and predominance.” (Iran Times, Sept. 18)Right to self-determination affirmedConsequently, the summit’s declaration stressed “the inalienable right of all peoples, including those of non-self-governing territories, as well as those of territories under foreign occupation or under colonial or foreign domination, to self-determination.“In the case of peoples who are subject to foreign occupation and colonial or foreign domination, the exercise of self-determination remains valid and essential to securing the eradication of all those situations and ensuring the universal respect of human rights and fundamental freedoms.”Pressing issues addressed at the summit included climate change, sustainable economic development, U.N. Security Council reform, human rights, unilateral sanctions, peacekeeping missions and religious tolerance.   Also discussed were international solidarity, South-South cooperation, the role of youth, gender equality, the need for a new world communications and information order, and independence for Palestine and the Western Sahara.Republic of Zimbabwe’s President Robert Mugabe called upon the NAM to increase its cooperation with his country, now facing greater threats by former colonial and now neocolonial powers. For the last 15 years, imperialist governments in Washington, London and other European Union countries have imposed harsh economic sanctions on Zimbabwe.Mugabe, before attending the U.N. General Assembly in New York, emphasized to summit participants: “Poverty is a threat to international peace and security and the well-being of people who are at the center of Agenda 2030. We should, therefore, continue to speak out against unilateral actions that undermine efforts to address poverty and underdevelopment.“Zimbabwe and other Non-Aligned Movement members continue to be targets of unwarranted sanctions from powerful countries who seek to use economic might to impose their will on others. We are grateful for the steadfast support and solidarity from the movement, and expect sustained efforts to have these heinous sanctions lifted.” (Zimbabwe Sunday Mail, Sept. 18)FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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The Trump/Bannon cabal

first_imgFeb. 27 — As the Trump administration opens up new attacks on the masses, the split between the White House and the capitalist establishment is growing ever sharper.The head of the Department of Homeland Security, John Kelly (retired general, U.S. Marines), has signed sweeping memos that vastly expand the definition of undocumented immigrants immediately subject to deportation. Random arrests have taken place across the country. Fear is stalking neighborhoods from Long Island to Los Angeles to Chicago and the border areas. Immigrants are afraid to get in a car or go to the store for fear of being snatched by Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents. Coming across the border is now considered a deportable crime. This applies to 11 million people.In addition to deportations there is an escalation of arbitrary harassment. For example, Muhammad Ali Jr. and his mother were stopped at a Florida airport and held for two hours because of their Muslim names. A holocaust scholar from Paris who was born in Egypt narrowly escaped deportation. An undocumented worker, Sara Beltran Hernandez, who was hospitalized for treatment of a tumor in Texas, was seized by border control agents and put in a detention center. Incidents such as these are multiplying across the country.The Trump/Bannon budgetMeanwhile, Trump is scheduled to address a joint session of Congress on Feb. 28 at which he will announce the Trump/Bannon budget. Stephen Bannon is an ultra-rightist and the president’s top advisor.Advance advertising about the budget calls for a $54 billion increase in military spending, which currently stands officially at $584 billion. The proposed increase is 9.2 percent. (This excludes the Energy Department, which oversees nuclear weapons.)According to the Feb. 27 Reuters: “Trump has previously said he would expand the Army to 540,000 active-duty troops from its current 480,000, increase the Marine Corps from 23 to 36 battalions — or as many as 10,000 more Marines — boost the Navy from 276 to 350 ships and submarines, and raise the number of Air Force tactical aircraft from 1,100 to 1,200.” He has also been talking about increasing the U.S. nuclear arsenal.“An official familiar with the proposal said Trump’s request for the Pentagon included more money for shipbuilding, military aircraft and establishing ‘a more robust presence in key international waterways and choke points’ such as the Strait of Hormuz and South China Sea.”The push to expand the military off the coasts of China and Iran flows from Bannon’s worldview that there will be wars in the Middle East and the South China Sea within the next 10 years.Washington already has the largest military budget many times over than any other country. Furthermore, it is not now engaged in any major wars of a conventional character. One can only speculate that this military budget is preparation for future major military adventures.The expansion of the military budget is also a resort to the time-honored method of creating jobs, a pledge Trump has been saying over and over since his campaign began. High-tech warfare is technology-intensive and does not produce many jobs. But Trump’s preparation for conventional battlefield, air and sea warfare is part of his jobs program. He is also trying to build political support among the military-industrial complex, both the brass and the corporations.Bannon and the ‘Strategic Initiatives Group’The budget may not survive as projected by Trump. But it has Bannon’s fingerprints on it, reflecting his warlike ideology. To further these militaristic goals, as well their anti-immigrant goals, he and Trump have created a behind-the-scenes group, parallel to the National Security Council. This body is called the Strategic Initiatives Group.The NSC is supposed to be the authoritative body that advises on policy and intervention all over the world. It has been the traditional forum for  mainstream capitalists, their foreign policy establishment and spy agencies — e.g., the State Department, the Pentagon, the CIA, etc. The NSC is traditionally the most powerful body advising the president on policy.The Strategic Initiatives Group is supposed to be a “think tank” inside the NSC, but in fact it is a select group inside the White House. It consists of Bannon, Jared Kushner (Trump’s son-in-law), Steven Miller and other unnamed Breitbart loyalists. One of them, Sebastian Gorka, is the son of an anti-communist Hungarian refugee who was decorated by the Nazis. The son is a fanatical Islamophobe who has been photographed wearing his father’s Nazi medal. (thedailybeast.com, Jan. 31)Despite its think tank cover, the SIG makes policy proposals, such as the refugee travel ban, among other things. It circumvents the State Department, the CIA, the Joint Chiefs of Staff and other organs that are supposed to be in the loop. It is a dangerous cabal. While this cabal suffered a severe setback when three courts ruled against the travel ban, the Trump/Bannon group is trying to reinstate the ban.Trump administration splitBannon and the SIG operate independently and in opposition to the establishment agencies. For example, just before Vice President Michael Pence was to go to Brussels to affirm the Trump administration’s support for the European Union, the German-dominated federation of European states, Bannon had a lengthy telephone conversation with the German ambassador to the U.S.According to a Feb. 21 article in Reuters: “[S]ources described a longer meeting in which Bannon took the time to spell out his world view. They said his message was similar to the one he delivered to a Vatican conference back in 2014 when he was running the right-wing website Breitbart News.“In those remarks, delivered via Skype, Bannon spoke favorably about European populist movements and described a yearning for nationalism by people who ‘don’t believe in this kind of pan-European Union.’”Shortly before this conversation, Peter Navarro, the head of Trump’s National Trade Council, accused German bankers of being currency manipulators. This came as a shock in Berlin. It is undoubtedly part of an attempt to sharply escalate antagonisms with German finance capital. Navarro is also a currency hawk against China.This is part of the Bannon/Trump strategy to maneuver with Russia while fulfilling Bannon’s nationalist line.Similarly, Trump has been repeatedly quoted about “taking Iraqi oil.” Secretary of Defense James Mattis (retired general, U.S. Marines) had to go to Iraq and disavow any intention to take Iraq’s oil. Of course this was a lie; the entire Iraq war was about trying to get Iraq’s oil. (The effort failed.) But Mattis had to cover up for Trump’s public belligerence.Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and DHS Secretary John Kelly went to Mexico to smooth out relations after Trump told President Enrique Peña Nieto that Mexico would have to pay for a wall and that the U.S. would send troops to “clean up bad hombres” there.Kelly told a press conference on Feb. 23 that there would be no mass deportations and no military mobilization against undocumented workers in the U.S. Shortly thereafter, Trump said there would be a wide campaign against undocumented workers and described it as a “military operation.”During his campaign Trump said that Japan and south Korea should develop their own nuclear weapons because the U.S. shouldn’t have to pay for them. This called into question the inter-imperialist alliance in Asia. Mattis had to go to Seoul and Tokyo to reaffirm U.S. alliances with both countries.Trump met with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu without the secretary of state. He then told a press conference that he was for a one-state solution to the Palestinian question. This was a sharp departure in words (not deeds) from decades of U.S. official policy.Nikki Haley, Trump’s U.N. ambassador, then had to state categorically at the U.N. that Washington stands “firmly behind” a two-state solution.In short, the Trump/Bannon worldview is in struggle with the mainstream military/imperialist view. The mainstream view is rooted heavily in the policy of surrounding Russia in alliance with the NATO powers and pushing into central and Eastern Europe.This conventional U.S. worldview is also rooted in gradually ratcheting up pressure on China by moving military assets to the Pacific and arming both Japan and south Korea. At the same time, Wall Street and the transnational corporate monopolies have steadily invested in China and built up global supply chains that depend upon stable U.S.-China relations.The mainstream view is an Atlantic/Pacific strategy of U.S. imperialism that has been built up over decades.Beware the ‘adults in the room’Many liberals and even moderate Republicans were overjoyed when Lieutenant General H.R. McMaster was appointed to replace Islamophobe Michael Flynn as Trump’s National Security Adviser.McMaster is supposed to be a no-nonsense general who has a record of speaking truth to power — that is, telling civilian authorities to stop trying to manage the military in matters of warfare. McMaster, General Kelly, General Mattis and Tillerson are supposed to be the “adults in the room” who will deal with immature, out-of-control Trump and his fanatical adviser Bannon.However, to look to these Pentagon generals and Tillerson, the former CEO of the largest private oil company in the world, to protect the progressive interests of the masses in the face of Trump is a dangerous and foolish course.If the generals are opposed to the Trump policy, it is only because they fear he will ruin their plans to dominate the Middle East, Eastern Europe, China and the rest of the world. The military and the oil companies are cunning and deceitful in their plans for global domination.They are not “adults” to be relied upon. They are enemies of workers and oppressed peoples worldwide. They are the architects of military intervention and aggression around the world. Their goal is conquest and imperialist expansion.‘Deconstructing the administrative state’“Deconstructing the administrative state” is the phrase Bannon uses to describe sweeping away all institutional protections for the masses, for the environment, for women, immigrants, people of color, the poor and all who are victimized by the workings of capitalism and capitalist politics.Whatever rules and regulations exist to slow down the aggression of capital against the people, or to institutionalize the gains they made in the struggle, are in most cases in the regulatory agencies. One look at Trump’s cabinet appointments for the domestic agencies shows that he and Bannon mean to pulverize all the regulatory protections that exist for society as a whole.To pay for the $54 billion increase in military spending, the offset is going to come from deep cuts in the budgets of the State Department and all the domestic regulatory agencies. This is why Trump’s cabinet picks for Education, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Health and Human Services, Department of Housing and Urban Development, etc., are all people who want to destroy the fundamental missions of the very departments they are supposed to lead.If Trump and Bannon are to be stopped, they must be stopped by the mobilized masses — in the communities, in the unions, on the campuses, in the factories and workplaces. A united movement of organized workers and the oppressed acting militantly will interfere with and halt the plans of this reactionary cabal.Goldstein is the author of Capitalism at a Dead End and Low-Wage Capitalism. Both are available via online booksellers. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Kempis Ghani Songster: ‘The struggle of working people in the prison system’

first_imgKempis Ghani Songster co-produces the podcast “Move It Forward” which can be listened to at: transom.org/2020/move-it-forward/These slightly edited comments are from a Dec. 10 webinar organized by the Prisoners Solidarity Committee of Workers World Party.Co-moderator Monica Moorehead: We’re very excited to welcome to the panel Kempis Ghani Songster. He is the Healing Justice Organizer for the Amistad Law Project and the host of the new monthly podcast show, “Move It Forward.” He is also co-founder of Ubuntu Philadelphia. Our earlier panelist, Swift Justice, was speaking from an Alabama prison. What similar conditions did you experience in Pennsylvania prisons? Why should the issue of mass incarceration concern all workers? How does the struggle of people on the inside affect all of us?Kempis Ghani Songster: Thank you for having me. As Swift Justice was talking, and I was hearing the sounds coming through his phone receiver, it brought back some visceral memories from me, some cellular memories for me, because December 28 will mark my third year back in the wide open world after 30 years of incarceration. That began in 1987, at the age of 15, for me. I was sentenced to life without parole at the age of 15 in Pennsylvania. And in Pennsylvania, life without parole is not like life in a lot of other states, where you might serve 20 years or 25 years or any number of years, and then you’re eligible to see the parole board. In Pennsylvania, life means natural life — you’re sent to prison effectively to die. Which is why we increasingly know “life” now as “death by incarceration by the state.” Because anything so final as death shouldn’t be called life. We call it what it is — death by incarceration. The only reason why I’m on this call with you today is because the U.S. Supreme Court made some rulings, starting on June 25, 2012, with Mila vs. Alabama, saying that it’s unconstitutional to sentence children, or people under 18 years of age, to mandatory life without parole. And because it applied to me, I was eventually resentenced. But I’m still on lifetime parole — I’m on parole for the rest of my life. So I’m not entirely free, I’m still chained to the plantation. The ‘we’ of incarcerated peopleWhen I speak about incarcerated people, I’m going to use the term “we.” I’m not going to say “them,” because I still feel I’m talking about me, because at any given time, I could be sent back to serve out the rest of my sentenceI really appreciate being here, with you. That’s not some trite cliché thing to say. I really appreciate it, because I know that I’m not supposed to be here. In Pennsylvania and in my prison experience, the struggle is a lot like what Swift Justice was talking about. My analysis of the situation of incarcerated workers comes from my observation, as well as analysis that was groomed by people like Karl Marx and James Boggs and C.L.R. James and Hannah Arendt. Hannah Arendt talked about a society where exchange of products has become the chief public activity, where even the laborers — because they’re confronted with commodity owners — become owners of their own labor in a manufacturing society that judges men not as persons, but as producers according to the quality of their products. It was through that lens that I started to analyze exactly what the situation was with incarcerated workers.Because we were in a situation where we were already devalued as human beings, we were already squeezed out of a workforce that was increasingly automated and cybernated. We were the people that were no longer needed in the workforce. And so this society’s answer to this growing army of people who were no longer needed in the workforce was to round them up and warehouse them. And in the situation that we found ourselves, as we entered the prison gates, we were strip-searched and told to strip down and put on this new prison uniform. As we walked through our day-to-day life in prison, we began to see that, not only are we judged as nonpersons, but we’re also judged as not-producers anymore. We’re just consuming items identified by a number. The value of work to someone insideToo few of the people that I knew would look at their new predicament with that kind of political depth, at least initially, but unless you were the walking dead, you felt the sting of being slapped by an invisible hand entering that dreary place where everyone’s status says to them loud and clear — you have no value, you ain’t worth shit to society anymore if you ever did at all. To have your labor valued even at 19 cents an hour can seem like a saving grace. Just as having a good job in free society can do wonders for a person’s self-esteem, having a job or work assignment in prison can go a long way with helping a person preserve or regain a modicum of dignity and self-worth. But some men behind the walls, like at the prison that I left from, we had never worked in the free world, we had been in a prison since we were children — like me incarcerated since the age of 15. So work offered people like me a sense of being grown-up and responsible, even if the wages paid were less than the allowance that our parents had given us. We still felt grown-up. A person’s very humanity is inextricably tied to jailhouse work. And lack of family support or lack of family — because I knew people that didn’t have any family anymore — compels some people to work. Resistance and prison workSome people at some time avoid prison jobs for as long as they can for personal or political reasons. They don’t want to participate in their own enslavement and exploitation. It’s their personal protest or resistance that always has the potential of reclaiming some proprietorship of prison labor power. These kinds of men and their stance are rendered insignificant by a population of scabs. That’s what I also experienced in Pennsylvania. We weren’t able to organize on a mass level, like we see going on in Alabama. Family generosity allows such men, who resist by not working, to hold out for a while, but eventually they desist, and they break down and get a job. Everybody does. Well, not everybody — some people are implacable, like some of our political prisoners. This has been what I’ve observed as the struggle of working people in the prison system, where we have 2.5 million people [in the U.S.] who are now held hostage. Not in the interest of “justice” or “public safety,” but in the interests of a handful of elite sociopathic hustlers, hell-bent on using force to squeeze and suck the last drops of use value from the bodies of Black, Brown and poor white people who have no longer any use value to the “free” world. This has been our struggle in Pennsylvania, fighting against life without parole, which basically guarantees that [the state will] have an increasing number of permanently held people, so that they can squeeze, forever, every last drop of labor power they can  from these individuals — from us. Prison work and the outside worldNow moving forward, I’m seeing what the relevance of our prison struggle has to do with folks on the outside. The most problematic layer of the conditions that motivated the emergence of the movement in Alabama is the level to which the prison-based economy has been assimilated into the culture of society at large. Everybody out in society has somehow been benefiting from prison labor. And not only has everyone in prison been participating in their own exploitation and oppression through prison labor themselves, but they’ve been enabling this country’s prosecution of endless wars — a genocide of war campaigns on other human beings and other parts of the world. Weapon manufacturers such as General Dynamics, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, Boeing — just to name a few — all depend on prison laborThus, imprisoned people, if they organize properly, can very well have a significant impact on this country’s ability to destroy more lands and more people. But as the weapons industry pays politicians to stoke the flames of more and more war in order to create, maintain and grow markets for their weapons — so also they’re going to force prison labor to increase and accelerate. Because warehoused human beings are simply too valuable to release — even and especially after they educate, rebuild, rehabilitate themselves, transform ourselves.So the prison population continues to increase. Even as crime rates drop, the prison population still goes up, because people are receiving longer sentences — life without parole, death by incarceration — in order to hold them in prison and milk their labor power until they die.This is why building solidarity with incarcerated workers is so important, because there is no separation between what goes on “outside” in society and what happens to incarcerated workers behind the walls. In fact, mass incarceration is this society’s response to the increased rejection of people of color and poor people from the workforce. Mass incarceration — I’m not a fan of the term “mass incarceration.” To me, the word is “human warehousing.” It’s not mass incarceration. These are not faceless masses of people; these are human beings. They had births; their parents had dreams for them; they got families that are doing the time with them. They have faces; they have stories; they have souls, and they have spirits. This is not mass incarceration. This is human warehousing and the beginning of the movement. One of the first steps in this movement is to interrogate our own consciousness, our own perception of the issues that we’re fighting against. And that means interrogating the language that we use, right? We’re talking on this Day of International Human Rights. We have to use language in our movement that confers humanity onto people. COVID-19 and prisonSo in this human warehousing, it’s crucial that we address the issue of the pandemic. Because COVID-19 behind the walls is killing people en masse. Pennsylvania prisons have turned into volcanoes of the virus; they’re epicenters of the virus. People are dying; guards are coming in and just infecting people left and right. And we’re screaming out at the top of our lungs, on our rooftops: “Release the vulnerable! Release the vulnerable!” And they won’t, they won’t release people. Even though the U.N. has issued a call for countries all around the world to decarcerate — especially urging America to begin to decarcerate. Countries like Turkey have already released over 100,000 of their prison population. Iran has released over 100,000 people. Countries all over are way ahead of the game. The U.S. is using punitive measures to address a public health crisis. And this is very, very important for the rest of us in this society, because it’s an egregious and glaring continuing crisis of human rights abuse. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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