Britain’s most powerful women

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Britain’s most powerful womenOn 2 Jul 2004 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Thetop 10 1.         Marjorie Scardino, the only chiefexecutive of a FTSE 100 company (Pearson).2.         Patricia Hewitt, head of the DTI andMinister for Women.3.         Rachel Lomax, deputy governor of theBank of England.4.         Clara Furse, first female chair of theLondon Stock Exchange.5.         Val Gooding, chief executive of Bupa.6.         Baroness Hogg, chairman of 3i anddeputy chairman of GKN.7.         Kate Barker, member of the monetarypolicy committee. 7.        Marian Bell, member of themonetary policy committee.8.         Cherie Booth.9.         Rose Marie Bravo, Founder of Café Rougeand CEO of Spirit Taverns.ByRebecca HoarManagement Today, July 2004last_img read more

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Kent Swig launches his own cryptocurrency

first_imgTerra Holdings’ Kent Swig (Swig Equities, iStock)Real estate investor and Terra Holdings owner Kent Swig has secured $6 billion in gold reserves to back his new cryptocurrency.DIGau, his digital token, will be pegged to the market price of the gold, Bloomberg News reported. The gold is guaranteed by liens that Swig and partner Stephen Braverman secured against mining claims in Nevada and Arizona through their company, Dignity Gold.Read moreBig on Bitcoin: Caruso now largest real estate firm to accept rent in cryptocurrencySocialite relists UES co-op for $45M The Covid churn: Inside resi brokerages’ recruiting games “Gold was one of the original rock-solid backings of all currencies,” Swig told the publication. “We’re not reinventing the wheel here. What we’re doing is applying the world’s stable backing of a lot of things to a very advanced technology.”ADVERTISEMENTWhile cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin have seen massive swings, pegging the new coin to a physical asset could stabilize it.Swig’s new coin isn’t the first attempt to combine gold and crypto; other attempts haven’t had much success, according to Bloomberg. But an interest in both has increased in recent years, as investors seek to protect themselves against inflation.Billionaire Rick Caruso’s real estate firm recently became the largest real estate firm to accept rent in cryptocurrency.[Bloomberg] — Sasha JonesContact Sasha Jones Email Address* Tags Full Name* Message* Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Share via Shortlink CryptocurrencyKent Swiglast_img read more

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Recording booths connect Oxford and Calais migrant camp

first_imgRecording booths have been set up so that Oxford residents can exchange messages with inhabitants of the Calais migrant camp. Messages are swapped between the booth outside East Oxford Community Centre and the camp, via a handheld recording device and email.Over 100 people have recorded or listened to the messages at the booth so far. The project runs from 10am to 3pm, weather depending, until Saturday.Source: BBC NewsThe scheme is the brain-child of Oxford Brookes student Isobel Tarr, who commented, “For people at the camp I hope it can show that people in the UK support them and welcome them, and are capable of listening to them, in a situation where they don’t generally feel heard.“For people in the UK, some have commented that it has helped them to think about what it means to find solidarity with others… having connected with an individual person rather than a mass of people.”Oxford linguist Fuchsia Hart, who has been working at the camp in Calais, added that, “It’s important that people send messages back from the UK to show that they hear their struggle, and try to make a connection with the people as individuals.”last_img read more

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IT IT TRUE AUGUST 16, 2017

first_imgIS IT TRUE that the often recurring solar eclipse that is coming to the United States is bringing the crazies out of the closets?…a psycho minister named David Meade who believes in the nonsensical practice of numerology is predicting that a fictional planet named Nibiru will crash into the earth and extinguish all life 33 days after the eclipse of 2017?…we are sure that when the doesn’t happen the loony tunes crew will immediately focus on the next eclipse which will happen in 2024?…these dimwits are in the class of fool that Do and Peep of Heaven’s Gate fame were when they conned a bunch of followers into drinking poison in preparation to catch a ride to nirvana on the Hale Bopp Comet?IS IT TRUE that its being alleged that the best city to view the solar eclipse of 2017 is Hopkinsville, Kentucky?…Hoptown as locals call it has been in the national spotlight before as the location where aliens landed and took some locals for a ride in 1955?…the world can thank Hoptown for the term “little green men” as the reported alien invasion was carried out by such characters?…ask anyone who grew up in Western Kentucky what it meant when one’s grandparents said “you better stop that or the guys in the white wagon are gonna take you to Hopkinsville” means and they will understand that meant a trip to the insane asylum?…perhaps the reverend David Meade will be in Hoptown next week where he belongs?IS IT TRUE that there are other less ridiculous questions being raised about the impact of the eclipse?…there are some who are saying that the deserts of the southwest that are not even in the path of total eclipse are warning about desert cooling?…these folks must not be aware that there is a time called dusk that happens everyday and has for millenniums without impacting the desert climate?…to expect the scorpions to be cold due to eclipse induced climate change from an eclipse in Oregon ranks right up there with Planet Nibiru for sensationalistic idiocy?…the entire time of total blackout is less than 3 minutes everywhere?…the earth has survived this natural occurrence millions of times and it will survive millions more?…the only constant with respect to eclipses is that it brings out the nut cases among us?IS IT TRUE we appreciate Saint Vincent Hospital Public Relations Department for sending us news of interest concerning the happenings at their facilities system wide?Todays “READERS POLL” question is: Do you feel that the Evansville City Council members are facing a major financial shortfalls concerning this years budget? Please take time and read our newest feature articles entitled “LAW ENFORCEMENT, READERS POLL, BIRTHDAYS, HOT JOBS” and “LOCAL SPORTS” posted in our sections.  You now are able to subscribe to get the CCO daily.If you would like to advertise in the CCO please contact us City-County [email protected] or call 812-454-1713.EDITOR’S FOOTNOTE:  Any comments posted by our reader’s in this column do not represent the views or opinions of the City County Observer or our advertisers.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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LANDMARK SUPREME COURT RULING CONCERNING THE USE OF DEADLY FORCE

first_imgTennessee v. Garner Tennessee v. Garner, 471 U.S. 1 (1985)[1], was a case in which the Supreme Court of the United States held that, under the Fourth Amendment, when a law enforcement officer is pursuing a fleeing suspect, he or she may not use deadly force to prevent escape unless “the officer has probable cause to believe that the suspect poses a significant threat of death or serious physical injury to the officer or others.” Supreme Court of the United States Seal of the United States Supreme Court.svg Full case nameTennessee v. Edward Garner, et al. LANDMARK SUPREME COURT RULING CONCERNING THE USE OF DEADLY FORCE U.S. Const. amend. IV MajorityWhite, joined by Brennan, Marshall, Blackmun, Powell, Stevens FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare Laws applied Prior historyOn certiorari from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit 1Facts and procedural history2Majority opinion3Dissent4See also5External links Chief JusticeWarren E. Burgercenter_img Argued October 30, 1984Decided March 27, 1985 Holding Court membership Law enforcement officers pursuing an unarmed suspect may use deadly force to prevent escape only if the officer has probable cause to believe that the suspect poses a significant threat of death or serious physical injury to the officer or others. DissentO’Connor, joined by Burger, Rehnquist Associate JusticesWilliam J. Brennan, Jr. · Byron WhiteThurgood Marshall · Harry BlackmunLewis F. Powell, Jr. · William RehnquistJohn P. Stevens · Sandra Day O’Connor Tennessee v. GarnerFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Contents Case opinions Facts And Procedural HistoryAt about 10:45p.m. on October 3, 1974, Memphis police officers Leslie Wright and Elton Hymon were dispatched to answer a burglary call next door. Officer Hymon went behind the house as his partner radioed back to the station. Hymon witnessed someone running across the yard. The fleeing suspect, Edward Garner, stopped at a 6-foot-high (1.8 m) chain-link fence. Using his flashlight, Hymon could see Garner’s face and hands, and was reasonably sure that Garner was unarmed. The police testified that they believed Garner was 17 or 18 years old; Garner was in fact 15 years old. After Hymon ordered Garner to halt, Garner began to climb the fence. Believing that Garner would certainly flee if he made it over the fence, Hymon shot him. The bullet struck Garner in the back of the head, and he died shortly after anambulance took him to a nearby hospital. Ten dollars and a purse taken from the burglarized house were found on his person.Hymon acted according to a Tennessee state statute and official Memphis Police Department policy authorizing deadly force against a fleeing suspect. The statute provided that “if, after notice of the intention to arrest the defendant, he either flee or forcibly resist, the officer may use all the necessary means to effect the arrest.”Garner’s father then brought suit in the United States District Court for the Western District of Tennessee under the Civil Rights Act of 1871, 42 U.S.C. § 1983, naming the City of Memphis, its mayor, the Memphis Police Department, its director, and Officer Hymon as defendants. The District Court found the statute, and Hymon’s actions, to be constitutional. On appeal, the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit reversed. The Court of Appeals held that the killing of a fleeing suspect is a “seizure” for the purposes of the Fourth Amendment, and is therefore constitutional only when it is reasonable. The court then found that based on the facts in this case, the Tennessee statute failed to properly limit the use of deadly force by reference to the seriousness of the felony.Majority OpinionJustice White wrote for the majority, first agreeing with the Sixth Circuit’s determination that apprehension by use of deadly force is a seizure, then framing the legal issue as whether the totality of the circumstances justified the seizure. In order to determine the constitutionality of a seizure, White reasoned, the court must weigh the nature of the intrusion of the suspect’s Fourth Amendment rights against the government interests which justified the intrusion.The use of deadly force against a subject is the most intrusive type of seizure possible, because it deprives the suspect of his life, and White held that the state failed to present evidence that its interest in shooting unarmed fleeing suspects outweighs the suspect’s interest in his own survival.White examined the common law rule on this matter and its rationale. At common law, it was perfectly legitimate for law enforcement personnel to kill a fleeing felon. At the time when this rule was first created, most felonies were punishable by death, and the difference between felonies and misdemeanors was relatively large. In modern American law, neither of these circumstances existed. Furthermore, the common law rule developed at a time before modern firearms, and most law enforcement officers did not carry handguns. The context in which the common law rule evolved was no longer valid. White further noted that many jurisdictions had already done away with it, and that current research has shown that the use of deadly force contributes little to the deterrence of crime or the protection of the public.On the basis of the facts found by the district court, Hymon had no reason to believe that Garner was armed or dangerous. The Court ordered the case remanded for a determination on the liability of the other defendants.DissentIn her dissent, Justice O’Connor highlighted the fact that police officers must often make swift, spur-of-the-moment decisions while on patrol, and argued that the majority did not properly consider this aspect of the case. Moreover, burglary is a serious crime which often leads to rape and murder, and the Tennessee statute represents the state legislature‘s judgment that such crimes may require the use of deadly force in order to protect the public against those who commit such crimes. She also disagreed that a suspect’s interest in his own life necessarily allows the right to flee from the scene of a crime when pursued, thereby escaping due process. Citations471 U.S. 1 (more)105 S. Ct. 1694; 85 L. Ed. 2d 1; 1985 U.S. LEXIS 195; 53 U.S.L.W. 4410last_img read more

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Former Indiana Senator to speak at Forum

first_imgFormer U.S. Senator Evan Bayh will speak Thursday about government’s role in the marketplace, one of the themes of the Notre Dame Forum’s year-long conversation about the global marketplace and the common good. Bayh, a Democrat who represented Indiana in the Senate from 1999 to 2011 and served two terms as Indiana’s governor, will continue the conversation in this year’s Forum events. He will present his views on the role of government in relation to the common good and the development of an equitable society, said Ed Conlon, associate dean of the Mendoza College of Business and chairman of the Working Committee for the Notre Dame Forum. “The common good is the integrating theme for the Forum, so we’ve looked at it from a standpoint of the marketplace, the professions and science and technology so far,” Conlon said. “This is an opportunity to look at how government contributes to the common good.” Conlon said Bayh’s political experience at both the state and federal levels make him well-suited to understand and assess the challenges and opportunities that government has in contributing to the common good and the improvement of the economy, especially in America. “The connection between government and the common good should be obvious to people in that a government should improve the quality of life of its citizens,” Conlon said. “But the real question is how the government can make the best possible contributions to the common good.” Conlon said Bayh’s public decision not to seek reelection in November 2010 came as a result of his growing frustration with the function of government and its role in American life. This sentiment relates to the discussion of the government and the common good, Conlon said. “[Bayh] was frustrated that the government was no longer functioning as it should, but because he’s not running for office, he’s at a point where he can be an honest critic and say what he thinks with regard to this topic,” Conlon said. Conlon said Bayh is an important political voice in Indiana and his participation in the Forum would strengthen the connection between Notre Dame and the state of Indiana. “It’s a good opportunity to have a person who is important to the state come to Notre Dame,” Conlon said. “When I talked to [Bayh] about the Forum and what we had in mind, he resonated with the topic immediately and said it’s a great thing to discuss.” In addition to Bayh’s lecture, a number of other events will continue the Forum dialogue this semester, including Friday’s annual Green Summit, which will center on the theme, “Purchasing Power.” The Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Religious Values in Business at Mendoza will also host a major conference in partnership with the United Nations Global Compact and the United Nations Principles for Responsible Management Education titled, “The UN Millennium Development Goals, The Global Compact, and The Common Good.” The conference will take place March 20 to 22 and will address the moral purpose of business in advancing the global economy. An April event sponsored by the School of Architecture will examine the contributions of architecture to the quality of life in the world, especially the effects of “new urbanism” on life in cities, Conlon said. The third annual student-led Human Development Conference, sponsored by the Kellogg Institute for International Studies and the Ford Family Program in Human Development Studies, took place Feb. 11 and 12 and continued the ongoing Forum dialogue by focusing on the theme, “Unleashing Human Potential: Global Citizens in Pursuit of the Common Good.” Conlon also said Mendoza’s Ten Years Hence speaker series, “Business for the Common Good,” provides a unique opportunity for students from all disciplines to engage in the Forum discussion during the spring semester. “This is a course that picks out themes that are likely to shape the future over the next 10 years,” Conlon said. “It brings in people who are experts on the subject matter or are highly involved in the issues at hand.” Bayh’s lecture, “Government and the Common Good,” will take place Thursday at 7 p.m. in the Leighton Concert Hall of the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center (DPAC). Tickets will be available to the public at the DPAC ticket office one hour prior to the event. Tickets are free but are limited to two per person.last_img read more

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Commercial landscaping course

first_imgCommercial landscapers who want to know more about landscape management should take a class offered Dec. 3 on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Ga.Set from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. at the UGA Research and Education Garden, the class will cover site analysis and bed preparation, woody and herbaceous plant selection, fertilization and irrigation, and troubleshooting. Participants will also learn the basics of landscape equipment selection. Instructors will be UGA horticulturists Bodi Pennisi and Bob Westerfield. Commercial and private pesticide credit in category 24 will also be awarded. The program costs $40 and includes lunch. To register, visit the website http://tinyurl.com/29ux462. For more information, contact Val Schott at (770) 233-5598 or [email protected]last_img

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Insect-ival!

first_imgGarden volunteer Ann Blum has compiled 18 educational puppet shows she’s written for the annual festival. A signed copy of her book of puppet shows with supplemental information about each topic will be available for purchase. Tickets are $5 per person or a maximum of $20 per family. Children under the age of two are free. Pre-registration is not required. For more information, see botgarden.uga.edu or call (706) 542-6156. The event will feature educational games, discovery stations, roach races, an active beehive and an insect tasting. The popular butterfly release will take place at 11 a.m. on the lawn of the International Garden. The State Botanical Garden of Georgia at the University of Georgia will host the 22nd annual Insect-ival! Family Festival on Sept. 13 from 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. in the Visitor Center and Conservatory at the garden in Athens. Insect-ival! is sponsored by EarthShare of Georgia, the State Botanical Garden of Georgia, the UGA Lund Club, the UGA Department of Entomology and the Georgia Museum of Natural History.last_img read more

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Vermont Business Roundtable expects continued slow growth

first_imgThe chief executives of Vermont’s leading businesses appear poised to maintain their growth plans through early 2012, echoing results from the previous survey.  The survey was completed between September 8 and September 22 and released today by Vermont Business Roundtable Chair Steve Voigt, CEO, King Arthur Flour and President Lisa Ventriss.According to Roundtable President, Lisa Ventriss, ‘When viewed in the aggregate, these results point to an economy that is expecting to grow, albeit very slowly.  The effects of Tropical Storm Irene and the potential threat of a ‘double dip’ recession are, naturally, causes of great concern to our members. The good news is that 95 percent of CEO respondents expect to see their sales volumes increase or stay the same in the coming six months, which is consistent with the previous survey, and good news for Vermont products and services. Also encouraging news is that 90 percent of CEOs expect to maintain or grow in the size of their workforce through the fall and winter, again consistent with the previous survey results.Chair Steve Voigt said ‘Roundtable members are reflecting the reality that we live in strained economic times. Companies have worked very hard to control costs and pump money back into their businesses, which is why we are now seeing almost 60 percent of members with no future changes in capital spending. Those dollars have been invested already. Now, if they plan to grow, they will do it through investing in their workforces.’The Roundtable’s CEO Economic Outlook Survey provides a forward-looking view of the economic assumptions and attitudes of chief executive officers of 118 of the state’s top employers with an aggregate economic impact of $292 billion, with over $1.8 billion in corporate philanthropy, and employing more than 10 percent of the state’s workforce.  The members represent Vermont’s agriculture, construction, education, health services, finance, real estate, insurance, hospitality/leisure, manufacturing, information, utilities, professional/business services, wholesale trade, and non-profit industries. The response rate for this quarter was 52 percent.  Historically, rates have varied from 35 to 73 percent. 1. How do you expect your company’s sales to change in the next six months? SalesINCREASENO CHANGEDECREASEQ1 200483%13%4%Q2 200480%15%4%Q3 200471%25%4%Q4 200477%22%1%Q1 200578%19%3%Q2 200575%23%2%Q3 200574%24%2%Q4 200572%24%4%Q1 200678%20%2%Q2 200678%22%0%Q3 200669%25%6%Q4 200673%23%4%Q3 200851%35%14%Q4 200827%46%27%Q1 200933%30%37%Q2 200941%31%28%Q3 200934%49%17%Q1 201063%19%18%Q2 201069%24%7%Q3 201059%35%6%Q4 201071%23%6%Q1 201173%19%8%Q2 201161%34%5%Q3 201162%335Point change from Q2 to Q31-10Totals may not equal 100 due to rounding. 3. How do you expect your company’s employment to change in the next six months? 2. How do you expect your company’s capital spending to change in the next six months? VBR 9.29.2011… CapitalINCREASENO CHANGEDECREASEQ1 200462%30%8%Q2 200443%41%15%Q3 200451%42%7%Q4 200445%46%9%Q1 200555%37%8%Q2 200549%43%8%Q3 200557%38%5%Q4 200550%35%15%Q1 200645%45%10%Q2 200653%40%7%Q3 200640%50%10%Q4 200656%39%5%Q3 200838%42%20%Q4 200817 %43%40%Q1 200912%38%50%Q2 200917%51%32%Q3 200931%46%23%Q1 201050%42%8%Q2 201051%38%11%Q3 201037%48%15%Q4 201049%34%17%Q1 201147%38%15%Q2 201146%44%10%Q3 201139%583%Point change from Q2 to Q3-714-7Totals may not equal 100 due to rounding. EmploymentINCREASENO CHANGEDECREASEQ1 200457%38%4%Q2 200450%48%2%Q3 200459%37%4%Q4 200458%39%3%Q1 200555%38%7%Q2 200549%42%9%Q3 200549%44%7%Q4 200560%35%5%Q1 200654%39%7%Q2 200650%45%5%Q3 200643%49%7%Q4 200653%41%5%Q3 200840%42%18%Q4 200825%35%40%Q1 200923%37%40%Q2 200921%50%29%Q3 200934%46%20%Q1 201040%52%8%Q2 201046%45%9%Q3 201035%52%13%Q4 201051%38%11%Q1 201144%41%last_img read more

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Rabid bobcat found in Lexington County, SC

first_img“This is a tremendous victory for all who cherish Yellowstone’s grizzly bears and for those who’ve worked to ensure they’re protected under the Endangered Species Act,” Andrea Zaccardi, a senior attorney at the Center for Biological Diversity, said in a statement.  A bobcat is the latest animal to be found infected with rabies in Lexington County, SC, according to South Carolina’s Department of Health and Environmental Control. No people are known to have come into contact with the sick animal, but at least four dogs were exposed.  This week, a federal court upheld a lower court decision reversing a Trump administration policy that eliminated protections for grizzly bears in and around Yellowstone National Park, The Hill reports. In 2017, the Fish and Wildlife Service delisted grizzly bears as a threatened species. Wednesday’s court ruling agreed with a previous court ruling that the agency acted against the best science available when it delisted the bears.  The bobcat is the seventh animal in Lexington County to test positive for rabies this year, The State reports. Bobcats live across the entire state of South Carolina but are most commonly found in the Coastal Plain.  A celestial light show is coming to the northern sky this month. Comet NEOWISE, one of the brightest comets to pass earth in decades, is visible in the sky with the naked eye during the month of July. The comet is already visible in the sky around dawn, but beginning around July 12, it should be visible in the evening sky as well, Scientific American reports.  Court saves protection for Yellowstone grizzliescenter_img Rabid bobcat found in Lexington County, SC Astronomers say that if you want to catch a glimpse of the comet, now is the time to do it. When it leaves Earth’s vicinity later in July, it won’t come around again for another 6,800 years.  Photo courtesy of Getty Images Look up! NEOWISE comet visible in the sky this monthlast_img read more

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