Student government meets with South Bend police

first_imgTwo meetings in the past week between student government, the University and local law enforcement were part of ongoing communication between these groups, student body president Catherine Soler said. Soler said improvements made since the number of arrests spiked in August and September have been extensive, but student complaints have warranted dialogue with police. “I think we’ve come a long way, and I think that’s evident speaking with students involved in incidents and speaking with police,” Soler said. “We do have some questions about things that happened and [police] are doing some investigation on their part.” Soler and chief of staff Nick Ruof met with South Bend Police Chief Capt. Jeff Rynearson Friday night. Tuesday, Soler, Ruof and student body vice president Andrew Bell met with the chiefs of both Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP) and South Bend Police Department (SBPD) as well as the St. Joseph County’s Sheriff’s Department and members of University administration including Vice President for Student Affairs Fr. Doyle and Vice President for Public Affairs Tim Sexton. “Everyone in the room had the same goals, keeping the students safe, keeping the community safe,” Soler said. “Everyone was genuinely interested in not only making things better but maintaining it.” Soler said the talks highlighted the steps taken on both sides of the issue: Students are making better decisions and police are being more consistent in enforcement. “Capt. Rynearson of SBPD said he’d seen a noticeable difference in student behavior since the fall,” she said. “Not necessarily less parties but just being smarter, which is a good thing for everyone. “At the party at Irish Row, the police set a limit, .05 [blood alcohol content] or above would be taken to jail and below would be cited. Which is good because at least there’s expectations and standards.” Soler said while alcohol-related student arrests and citations still occur, the police have made strides in their execution. “In terms of respect and professionalism we’ve come really far,” she said. “We see a lot less antagonism and students don’t feel as targeted. The police [leaders] definitely expressed that [other officers] had been instructed to ensure that that’s not the attitude that comes off when they interact with students.” At the meeting the representatives also discussed improving relevant student programming, Soler said. “We talked a lot about programming we can do at the beginning of the year,” she said. “Not only alcohol education but a lot of safety stuff.” As improving police relations has been a major part of the Soler and Bell’s efforts as student government leaders, Soler hopes that communications continue to improve. “Up until this year, students didn’t really have an opportunity to meet with the police [through student government],” she said. “We all agree this communication should continue to happen in the future, that it’s been a catalyst on both sides.”last_img read more

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Former Indiana Senator to speak at Forum

first_imgFormer U.S. Senator Evan Bayh will speak Thursday about government’s role in the marketplace, one of the themes of the Notre Dame Forum’s year-long conversation about the global marketplace and the common good. Bayh, a Democrat who represented Indiana in the Senate from 1999 to 2011 and served two terms as Indiana’s governor, will continue the conversation in this year’s Forum events. He will present his views on the role of government in relation to the common good and the development of an equitable society, said Ed Conlon, associate dean of the Mendoza College of Business and chairman of the Working Committee for the Notre Dame Forum. “The common good is the integrating theme for the Forum, so we’ve looked at it from a standpoint of the marketplace, the professions and science and technology so far,” Conlon said. “This is an opportunity to look at how government contributes to the common good.” Conlon said Bayh’s political experience at both the state and federal levels make him well-suited to understand and assess the challenges and opportunities that government has in contributing to the common good and the improvement of the economy, especially in America. “The connection between government and the common good should be obvious to people in that a government should improve the quality of life of its citizens,” Conlon said. “But the real question is how the government can make the best possible contributions to the common good.” Conlon said Bayh’s public decision not to seek reelection in November 2010 came as a result of his growing frustration with the function of government and its role in American life. This sentiment relates to the discussion of the government and the common good, Conlon said. “[Bayh] was frustrated that the government was no longer functioning as it should, but because he’s not running for office, he’s at a point where he can be an honest critic and say what he thinks with regard to this topic,” Conlon said. Conlon said Bayh is an important political voice in Indiana and his participation in the Forum would strengthen the connection between Notre Dame and the state of Indiana. “It’s a good opportunity to have a person who is important to the state come to Notre Dame,” Conlon said. “When I talked to [Bayh] about the Forum and what we had in mind, he resonated with the topic immediately and said it’s a great thing to discuss.” In addition to Bayh’s lecture, a number of other events will continue the Forum dialogue this semester, including Friday’s annual Green Summit, which will center on the theme, “Purchasing Power.” The Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Religious Values in Business at Mendoza will also host a major conference in partnership with the United Nations Global Compact and the United Nations Principles for Responsible Management Education titled, “The UN Millennium Development Goals, The Global Compact, and The Common Good.” The conference will take place March 20 to 22 and will address the moral purpose of business in advancing the global economy. An April event sponsored by the School of Architecture will examine the contributions of architecture to the quality of life in the world, especially the effects of “new urbanism” on life in cities, Conlon said. The third annual student-led Human Development Conference, sponsored by the Kellogg Institute for International Studies and the Ford Family Program in Human Development Studies, took place Feb. 11 and 12 and continued the ongoing Forum dialogue by focusing on the theme, “Unleashing Human Potential: Global Citizens in Pursuit of the Common Good.” Conlon also said Mendoza’s Ten Years Hence speaker series, “Business for the Common Good,” provides a unique opportunity for students from all disciplines to engage in the Forum discussion during the spring semester. “This is a course that picks out themes that are likely to shape the future over the next 10 years,” Conlon said. “It brings in people who are experts on the subject matter or are highly involved in the issues at hand.” Bayh’s lecture, “Government and the Common Good,” will take place Thursday at 7 p.m. in the Leighton Concert Hall of the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center (DPAC). Tickets will be available to the public at the DPAC ticket office one hour prior to the event. Tickets are free but are limited to two per person.last_img read more

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Students inspire women through online forum

first_imgSeveral women at Saint Mary’s have embraced their unique role as women’s college students in spreading the word about women empowerment worldwide by contributing to the Smart Girls Group (SGG). Sophomore Victoria Wilbraham, who serves as SGG’s vice president and director of communications, said the group is an online community designed to connect, inspire and empower girls on an international level through writings in a daily blog, The Loop, and a monthly magazine, The Smart Girls Guide.   “Our motto, ‘Be Smart, Share Smarts,’ encourages girls to share their passions with others,” she said.  “We do this through The Loop and The Smart Girls Guide, both of which are fully run by high school and college girls.” Wilbraham said SGG currently involves 110 girls from 15 colleges and seven different countries in its online empowerment work, but the organization is looking to expand at Saint Mary’s, Notre Dame and beyond. “We will be launching a campus program in January,” she said. “The Campus Smart Girls will be a place where girls from different colleges around the country can come and share what is going on at their school.” Senior Monica Murphy began writing a monthly column for the online magazine, titled “Dear Smart Girl,” after Wilbraham and SGG founder Emily Raleigh, two of her close friends, shared their passion and vision for SGG and its global mission with her. “I quickly came on board and currently write inspirational columns for the magazine,” Murphy said. “I want girls to embrace all that they were created to be and to understand that they are invaluable.” Freshman Keeley Frost, who heads the Saint Mary’s Campus Program blog and will be featured on the cover of the magazine’s November issue, said the blog covers happenings at Saint Mary’s, Notre Dame and South Bend. Frost said becoming involved with SGG and its emphasis on confidence, strength, courage and power helped her learn about herself as well as the ability of young women to empower each other. “Girls have great potential to serve the world and make a difference in the lives of all other women around us,” she said. “By joining the Smart Girls Group, I realize the confidence I have in my life and how I can use it to inspire others. The SGG’s online media offerings serve to inform members of the Saint Mary’s community who may not know about the organization or its mission, Frost said, and all Belles are invited to help strengthen the College’s involvement in the SGG community.    “The magazine comes out monthly with amazing articles written by other Smart Girls, so this campus chapter is a great way to get the word out about SGG to the Saint Mary’s community,” Frost said.  “I am so excited for it to develop into something extraordinary.” Murphy said she is proud to be involved with an organization that strives to promote the power of women. “It is a true blessing to be a part of a ministry offering hope and light,” she said.  “Join us on this incredibly journey as we transform the minds and lives of girls across the world.” As part of the group’s involvement guarantee, Wilbraham said all girls interested in becoming part of SGG are welcome to do so and can contact her at [email protected] for more information. Contact Maddie Daly at [email protected]last_img read more

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Library begins interior renovations

first_imgWith the conclusion of the 50th anniversary celebration of the Hesburgh Library in May, the building will begin a multi-phase interior renovation project Dec. 22.University librarian Diane Walker said the research and scholarship needs of students have changed dramatically in the last 50 years. Photo Courtesy of Hesburgh Libraries — University of Notre Dame The renovation of the Hesburgh Library starting this month will open up the first and second floors and add new study spaces.“Technology is rapidly changing the landscape of teaching, learning and research at Notre Dame,” Walker said. “As teaching methods and instructional tools evolve, new spaces that support interdisciplinary research, multimedia assignments and collaborative group study are critical to intellectual engagement and, ultimately, academic success.”Librarian Jessica Kayongo said the renovation aims to provide the library’s users a high-quality study environment, which will place it as a leader in academic library spaces.“Ultimately, we want our users to find what they need for study and research and to be as inspired by the physical surroundings within Hesburgh Library as they are by the mural on its iconic exterior,” Kayongo said.Phase I of the renovation focuses on transforming the entrance gallery and tower floor 10, Kayongo said. A new entrance will be installed on the north side of the building, and the formation of new openings will create “vertical connections between the floors.”Renovations also include the addition of a skylight on the north end, adjacent to a new reading room on the second floor, and a south-facing view from the second floor out toward the stadium, Kayongo said.“These changes, we hope, will address user concerns we have heard over the years, particularly in terms of wayfinding and natural light,” she said. “Renovation of the 10th floor will [also] open up limited window access to more of our users.”Later renovation phases will also replace the wooden study carrels with updated furniture and add a scholar’s lounge, special collections room and grand reading room, according to the Notre Dame website.“The entire project is several phases, likely to take several years, but completion of subsequent project phases is dependent on benefaction,” Kayongo said.Walker said future phases will include the creation of the Collaboration Hub, which will “provide dynamic, flexible and inspirational environments with hi-tech capabilities where groups of students from various disciplines can work across multiple platforms to explore projects and research questions.”Renovation will also address students’ concerns for quiet, contemplative study spaces with the addition of a Grand Reading Room facing west, along with several smaller rooms for individual workspace, Walker said. Critical infrastructure issues such as the addition of electrical outlets will also be addressed in order to support research and learning, she said.“Some of the overarching features that will tie the renovation together [are] making neighborhoods, introducing natural light, creating connections and transforming learning spaces,” Walker said.Photo Courtesy of Hesburgh Libraries — University of Notre Dame While renovation planning lasted the duration of 2013, Kayongo said the majority of 2014 was spent developing specific design details. The final design was a collaboration between the Shepley [Bulfinch] architects, the Facilities Design & Operations, the renovation steering committee and various campus service providers.“It is truly exciting [for] library renovation to begin, as the building has not seen any major renovation, except to the lower level and the penthouse, since it opened 50 years ago,” Kayongo said.Walker said the 50th anniversary celebration of the Hesburgh Library was an opportunity to reflect on the past and on the “original vision that this library would stand as a symbol of academic excellence for the world to see.”“We are excited, now, to look ahead to the next 50 years and beyond,” she said.Students are invited to attend the Farewell to the Floor open house on the second floor of Hesburgh Library Wednesday at 4 p.m. The event will feature refreshments, music and a sign-the-floor event.To learn more about the renovation process go to renovation.library.nd.eduTags: Diane Walker, Farewell to the Floor, Hesburgh Library, Jessica Kayongo, Library renovationlast_img read more

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Justice Friday lecture explores implications of Title IX for LGBTQ students

first_imgThis week’s installment of the College’s Justice Fridays lecture series focused on explaining how Title IX protects students of all gender identities and sexual orientation from sex-based discrimination.Saint Mary’s senior Bri O’Brien led the conversation, focusing on how Title IX can benefit the LGBTQ community on college campuses. She offered a concise explanation of how Title IX works.“Title IX extends to claims of discrimination based on gender identity or failure to conform to stereotypical notions of masculinity or femininity,” O’Brien said.“Men, women, transgender students anybody of any gender identity or sexual orientation cannot be discriminated on that basis because that all originates from sex.”“You cannot discriminate on the basis of sex in any educational institutions that receive public funds … from that they [Title IX] elaborate onto sex-based harassment, gender based harassment, sexual violence and sexual harassment,” O’Brien said.While Saint Mary’s does an excellent job informing students of their rights when sexual assault occurs, O’Brien said, there is less focus on how Title IX protects the LGBTQ community.“We [Saint Mary’s] don’t really touch on the LGBTQ part of it,” O’Brien said.She said administrators should be trained and treat same-sex sexual harassment the same as heterosexual sexual harassment.“Recently, the [Office of Civil Rights’s] elaborated guidance on Title IX specifically said that administrators, faculty, staff, Title IX coordinators, deputy coordinators, mandated reporters; all these people have to have specified training on how to work with LGBTQ students.“When it comes to same sex assault, Title IX mandates the process should be the same for same sex assaults as it is for non-same sex assaults. So that means it shouldn’t look any different, you shouldn’t be asked any different questions,” O’Brien said.Junior Sarah Bastian said she had a better understanding of Title IX after the talk.“I learned that Title IX applies to every single student, regardless of sexual identity, who is a victim of sexual assault or harassment,” she said. “Also, there are women here at Saint Mary’s who sexually harass fellow students, but that is not discussed. The discussions mostly revolve around women being victimized by men. Neither situation should be ignored.”O’Brien concluded the talk by advising students to know their rights and to let the administration know they know their rights under Title IX to avoid miscommunication.Bastian said a basic knowledge of Title IX would enable students to more effectively navigate the system should they become a victim of sexual discrimination or harassment.“If you don’t know your rights, you cannot fully stand up for yourself,” she said.The Justice Friday lecture series takes place every Friday from 12 p.m. to 12:50 p.m. in Conference Room A and B of the Student Center.Tags: Justice Fridays, Title IXlast_img read more

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Speakers connect past athletic experiences, values

first_imgChristopher Adkins and Amber Lattner spoke about how their experiences in sports taught them the keys to a high level of ethical performance during “Life Lessons from Sports: Performance and Purpose” at the Mendoza College of Business on Tuesday afternoon.Adkins, the executive director of the Notre Dame Deloitte Center for Ethical Leadership, said questions of ethics arise frequently in athletics, and it is in these moments when people define themselves.“There are moments where you have to decide if you’re going to play dirty too,” Adkins said. “Are you going to go down to that level, or are you going to up your game? There are moments when you have to dig deep.”Adkins said a high school soccer coach taught him how to look within himself for a performance advantage. The coach emphasized the importance of visualizing a successful game beforehand, Adkins said.“I now realize this was a bit of cognitive behavioral therapy, to script ourselves,” Adkins said.Adkins said this same visualization process is necessary for maintaining a high ethical standard.“We need to figure out those moments when we were at our peak ethical performance, and then establish a trigger, much like when I need to go in the zone on the sports field to make a free throw,” Adkins said. “I need to go to all the moments when I’ve made it, not all the moments when I’ve missed. We need to do that ethically.”Lattner, founder of the Lattner Performance Group, said she first learned about the keys to peak performance as a 9-year-old, when along with playing soccer and going to school, she worked at her family’s McDonald’s franchise and helped care for her family’s cattle.“What I found was that the best of the best, regardless of what domain we’re in, whether it’s academics, athletics, livestock or business, they’ve all got similar traits,” Lattner said. “They have similar work ethics and disciplines and habits of excellence that contribute to them being the best in their respective crafts.”Later on, while playing soccer at Notre Dame, Lattner said her coach stressed the importance of maintaining excellent habits.“He said if you want to be a national champion, you have to act like a national champion, every single day, in everything you do,” Lattner said.Lattner said she soon became very interested in psychoneuromuscular theory, which relates to how our thoughts and emotions affect performance.“Our thoughts affect our emotions, our emotions affect our body’s response and ultimately that’s what’s going to dictate our behavior,” Lattner said. “What we think about is going to impact how we’re going to react and respond to things.”Lattner said the more we think about something, the more protein patterns are grown in the brain corresponding to this topic of thought. This “changes the form and function of your brain,” and consequently, Lattner said, controlling your thoughts is of the utmost importance.“If it is a good thought, keep it, use it, hold on to it, repeat it,” Lattner said. “If it’s not a good thought, guess what we should do? Chuck it.”Tags: Ethics week, Life lessons, sportslast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s Biology Club to host trivia night

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s Biology Club is hosting a trivia night Thursday to test the community’s knowledge on a variety of topics, from the history of the College to general science questions, in the Science Hall at 7 p.m.The event is open to participation from all majors as an effort to act as a unifying event for students, Biology Club vice president and senior Nicole Nemeth said via email. “We all hope that students will come and enjoy the fellowship of other Belles while having fun and showing off their trivia skills,” Nemeth said. Biology Club member and senior Allison Sweeney said she is most looking forward to seeing the evening’s turnout because of the club’s efforts to make the event feel welcoming to all. “I am most excited to see how many people come to the event and how everyone reacts to the questions that we put so much time into creating,” Sweeney said via email. “We wanted to make it fun for everyone of all majors.” Nemeth, along with the rest of the Biology Club executive board, came up with questions that they felt would both present a challenge to students but also be knowledge accessible to the entire community, not just those studying the sciences, she said. “We all enjoyed creating categories and questions,” Nemeth said. “Some of the questions are challenging and fun and we enjoyed putting them together.”Nemeth said the club sees the event as an opportunity to market themselves to all students, inviting the involvement of students from a variety of backgrounds and a variety of majors. The Biology Club has hosted multiple events this year to draw in students that come from non-science backgrounds. “This event will benefit the [Biology] Club by promoting our club to all students as an organization that is fun and inclusive,” Nemeth said. “We try to create events such as this that are not only science-based so as to reach out to everyone and truly show the campus what our club is about.”Nemeth said the club hopes to continue the trend of including all students. She also said the club plans to offer events with similar goals in the future. “We hope that in the future, the Biology Club will be able to continue to host similar events,” Nemeth said. “As a club, we try to plan a social event once a month, open to anyone that wishes to attend, so in the future other similar events would definitely be a possibility.”Sweeney added that the winner of the trivia night will receive a free graduate school exam preparation course, aiding them in their future application process. “We are also giving away a free Kaplan course at the trivia night, so any [Saint Mary’s] student will be able to win a free course to help them prepare for graduate school applications,” Sweeney said. Tags: Biology Club, Trivia nightlast_img read more

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Indian special-needs school founder speaks at Saint Mary’s

first_imgChitra Shah, the founder and director of Indian non-profit Satya Special School, spoke at the Saint Mary’s Carroll Auditorium on Monday. Satya Special School is the largest rehabilitation program for children with special needs in Pondicherry, India, servicing over 900 children.“I come from a privileged background,” Shah said. “When I say privileged background, I did what I wanted, I wore the clothes that I wanted, I studied the subject that I wanted and finally married the man that I wanted — something that a number of girls in India do not have the privilege of. Finally, when I married into a very wealthy family, I decided that I should give back something.”Shah said her mission to help her community started with a visit to a disabled girl’s home in which she witnessed abuse.“I saw this child tied up to a plastic chair with nylon ropes,” Shah said. “The mom very casually told me, ‘I leave her locked up like this eight hours a day.’ The first thought that crossed my mind was: ‘We keep dogs in a better condition.’”It wasn’t long until Shah realized this wasn’t uncommon in the area.“One of the things that this mom told me was that ‘I’m not the only one who ties up the children; I know so many other mothers who do this,’” Shah said. “So I gathered all these moms up and I asked them, ‘Would you send your children to a center if I started one?’”From there she started the school in 2003 with 20 children. Today the program has over 900 kids across nine centers in India.“There is a huge mythos attached to disabilities [in India],” Shah said. “… The belief is that they committed such a huge sin in the past that the gods have punished them with a special needs child. A child with autism is considered to be possessed by an evil spirit, so these kids are made to walk on fire and sometimes tied up to a tree and whiplashed. So whenever the family understands that they have a special needs child, the mothers are given two options: One is to walk out of the family with the child, or abandon the child.”The centers not only aid in the care and education of children with special needs, but helps build a community for the single mothers left to raise the children alone.“They started understanding that it was more scientific,” Shah said. “It was something else, it was not them. They all sat together and shared for the first time. Women in India would never go to a counselor. You would never go to somebody and share your problem.”Satya Special School has expanded since its start to include hydro, occupational, special education, group and speech therapy. They also include a school readiness program, activity-based learning, learning through visual media, learning practicality, drama as a learning tool, learning through movement and learning through play. Skill and vocational training is taught as well to the older residents. This includes teaching them paper quilting, baking, wood working, cup making and mat weaving.“We are sending out this strong message that there is so much hope,” Shah said. “Yes, you have a child who’s difficult to handle, but yet you can live your life and live it well.”Tags: disabilities, disability, India, Satya Special Schoollast_img read more

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Betrayal Indeed: Broadway Vet Jude Law Confirms Sienna Miller & Daniel Craig Affair Under Oath

first_img Star Files According to the Daily Mail, Law (currently headlining the West End’s Henry V) verified longtime pal Craig had a forbidden fling with former After Miss Julie star Miller. Law recalled when he confronted Craig, “We had known each other for many, many years, so the conversation took on all sorts of turns.” Daniel Craig Broadway vets tangled in a painful love triangle? Sounds like something out of a play. Tony and Oscar nominee Jude Law’s phone hacking trial against now defunct tabloid the News of the World has confirmed a real-life affair between his former fiancée Sienna Miller and Betrayal’s Daniel Craig. View Comments To top it all off, Law also found out on the day of the trial that a family member had sold details of his private life to the tabloid. Betrayal, indeed. Rachel Weiszlast_img read more

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Find Out Annie Potts’ Favorite Part of Swinging in Pippin

first_img Annie Potts The Tony-winning revival of Pippin is filled with awe-inspiring feats, but one of the musical’s show-stopping moments belongs to Annie Potts. The Emmy nominee is having a ball as the trapeze-swinging, “No Time at All”-belting Berthe, but she must have been nervous about the circus act, right? Nope. Potts swung by Today on February 11, and told hosts Kathie Lee Gifford and Hoda Kotb that the trapeze is her favorite part. “I’m up there with this beautiful boy who is mighty,” she gushed. Potts also talked about her musical theater background, a car accident that almost ended her career and Designing Women. Star Files Pippin Related Shows View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 4, 2015last_img read more

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