New season means a new look for Rugby World

first_img7. The AnalystIn another new feature, former Ospreys and Bristol coach Sean Holley provides in-depth analysis of the world’s top teams. To kick things off, he looks at how Exeter dominate possession, including how they implement ‘latching’.8. The men leading Scottish rugby forwardScottish rugby has a few new faces in situ for 2017-18. Dave Rennie has taken over at Glasgow Warriors and Richard Cockerill is in charge at Edinburgh, while new Scotland coach Gregor Townsend is preparing for the first home Tests of his reign. We have the lowdown on the three wise men hoping to take Scottish rugby forward.On the ball: Gregor Townsend took charge of Scotland in June. Photo: Getty Images9. Grass-roots rugbyIn his latest column, Stephen Jones looks at the problems facing the community game and finds out how the RFU are addressing them. This includes more artificial pitches, varied kick-off times and even a new format of the game.10. My life in pictures: Toby FloodNewcastle’s returning hero Toby Flood takes us through the ups and downs of his career with a look through photos from the early days to now.11. My Day Off… Rob EvansRugby World editor Owain Jones takes to the water with Scarlets and Wales prop Rob Evans as he goes fishing for bass. There’s also time to talk about his hopes for the season with both club and country.Go fish: Scarlets prop Rob Evans enjoys a day on the water fishing. Photo: Huw Evans Agency12. Player access Find out what’s inside the new-look Rugby World for the 2017-18 season To mark the start of a new season, Rugby World unveils a new look in the October edition. Not only have we revamped the design but we have introduced new features designed to get you closer to the game’s star players and added more hard-hitting opinion. Find out how to download the digital edition by clicking this link – and here are a dozen reasons to get a copy of the latest issue…1. New lookThe October issue features a fresh design and myriad new features we think you will love. From Inside the Mind to My Day Off, Rugby World has introduced fresh ideas with the aim of taking you closer to the stars than ever before and providing you with an insight into the person as well as the player. There are more exclusive photos and a crisper design too.2. More opinionWe know you all have views on the game and with so many big issues to debate we have added more opinion-led pieces to the magazine. As well as Stephen Jones’s monthly column and The Rugby Rant, we now have a monthly debate called Face-Off – in this edition we look at the RFU ending contracts for 15-a-side women’s players, with two former England players presenting their sides of the argument – and an agenda-setting piece called What You Should Be Talking About This Month.3. Club guideNo start-of-season issue of Rugby World would be complete without a club guide and we’ve dedicated a full page to all 26 teams competing in the Aviva Premiership and Guinness Pro14. As well as the lowdown on the ins and outs at each club, we analyse their prospects for this season, highlight a key man and pick out a player to watch.4. Behind the scenes with the English championsWe have revived an old feature where each month we will visit a club and go behind the scenes. These trips used to be undertaken by Mickey Skinner but Alan Dymock has now taken on the baton and what better place to start our new ‘Welcome to my club’ series than at Sandy Park, home of English champions Exeter Chiefs. Fun, games and beers all feature in Dymock’s day out.Chiefs visit: RW’s Alan Dymock enjoys himself at Sandy Park, home of Exeter. Photo: Sam Riley5. What next for Munster?They came close to lifting a trophy last season, reaching the semi-finals of the Champions Cup and final of the Guinness Pro14, but ultimately fell short. With director of rugby Rassie Erasmus leaving at the end of the year, what can we expect from the province this season? Tom English gives his verdict.6. Bootcamp Find yourself confused about what you should be doing from a fitness and nutrition perspective? Rugby World is here to help with our handy guide that tells you what exercises you should be doing and what foods you should be eating each month.FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HERE LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img TAGS: Highlight On top of all that we have a host of player features we think you will enjoy:Downtime with Gareth Ansconbe. The Cardiff Blues and Wales back talks about his life off the field.What it’s like to swap rugby for NFL. Former England Sevens player Alex Gray explains why he’s switched from rugby to American Football and reveals how he’s adapting to a different code.Inside the Mind of Adam Jones. Coaching, best mates and Lego all come up in conversation with the Harlequins, Wales and Lions prop.Jack Conan. The Leinster back-row excelled for Ireland in the summer and is now ready to battle Jamie Heaslip for both the blue and green No 8 shirt.Rising stars. Get to know Marcus Smith, the 18-year-old Harlequins fly-half who has been training with Eddie Jones’s England, and Darcy Graham, an up-and-coming Scottish outside back.Club Hero Michael Rhodes. The Saracens flanker talks about life with the European champions.Petrus du Plessis. The London Irish prop on why he thinks his new club will avoid relegation and his alter ego Borislav.We hope you enjoy the new-look Rugby World and please let us know what you think so we can continue to develop a great magazine for you.last_img read more

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Emma Wassell: The Scotland player who hasn’t missed a Test in six years

first_imgWhile there is still plenty of work to do, Wassell is keen to emphasise how much the Scotland set-up has changed in the six years she has been involved. She remembers playing in front of a couple of hundred people in her home town of Aberdeen for her second cap against England, whereas now they draw at least a couple of thousand to Scotstoun.Then there are the 2021 contracts given to ten players to help support their rugby career, either through direct funding or partnership agreements with employers.Wassell doesn’t have a contract but recognises the dedication of the whole squad. “Despite not being professional, every single person in the team trains and prepares as if they’re professional whilst balancing jobs, uni and so on.”The juggling of responsibilities is something Wassell understands well. Her final chartered accountant exam is in May and some classes for that clash with the Six Nations, a tournament for which she uses her annual leave to train for and play in.“It is difficult with exams and studying and work and rugby, but in the long run it will pay off. So many female players do it. I knew rugby would never be a career so it was important to make sure I had a good grounding in accountancy. The hardest part is studying alongside training and work, but my coaches are supportive and work are supportive.”She’ll be hoping her balance sheet is in credit come the end of the year with the Six Nations, 2021 qualifiers and that accountancy exam all on the agenda. Emma Wassell: The Scotland player who hasn’t missed a Test in six yearsAs an auditor who is one exam away from earning her chartered accountant qualification, Emma Wassell is good with figures. It’s a number from her rugby career that is the real standout, though.Since making her Scotland debut against Ireland in the opening game of the 2014 Six Nations, the lock has been involved in every Test her country has played. That’s 43 successive Internationals and 41 consecutive starts after two replacement appearances at the beginning of her journey. She would have two more caps had Scotland’s two most recent fixtures – against Italy and France – not been postponed due to the coronavirus outbreak.“I still can’t believe it,” says 25-year-old Wassell of her incredible run. “It’s been pretty special to be involved the whole way through. There’s an element of luck. I’ve had injuries but I’ve been managed extremely well; there have been times I’ve been hurting but not hurting enough not to play. I’ve missed a bit of club rugby, but not international.“When I do miss a game it will be a huge mental test. Everything is now building towards qualifying for the 2021 Women’s World Cup. I want to play as long as possible and to play for Scotland in a World Cup would be the pinnacle.”Qualification for New Zealand 2021 is far from guaranteed. They need to win the European qualifier in September, which will also feature Ireland, Italy and the winner of the 2020 Rugby Europe Women’s Championship (most likely Spain), or finish second in that event and subsequently win the repêchage tournament.It’s a tough ask for a team that has won only three Six Nations matches in Wassell’s time – and that includes four winless championships. Yet she believes improvements are being made. They comfortably beat South Africa on a two-Test tour last autumn, winning 47-5 and 38-15, and have a new coach in Philip Doyle, who famously guided Ireland to victory over the Black Ferns at the 2014 World Cup.“I fully believe we have the right plays, we’re just lacking execution sometimes,” reflects Wassell, who took up rugby aged 15 at Ellon Academy having previously done gymnastics while at primary school. “Everyone is buying into Philip Doyle’s game plan and what he believes we can achieve going forward.“We were very happy with how we performed in South Africa and we played how we set out to play. Then when we played Wales in November our set plays didn’t go to plan. We managed to fix that against Japan and were 20-10 up with ten minutes left but made a few mistakes, sat back and Japan came at us.“They deserved to win (24-20) but we need to play for 80 minutes and not take our foot off the pedal. Physically there are times we can be quicker off the line and we need to make our tackles, but the mental side of it is huge for us.” The lock has been a mainstay in the Scotland team since her 2014 debut Call to action: Emma Wassell in the thick of a Scotland maul (Getty Images) center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS This article originally appeared in the February 2020 issue of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

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Students to develop life, job skills through Kansas youth program

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Collierville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL By Melodie WoermanPosted Feb 18, 2014 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Events Submit a Press Release [Episcopal Diocese of Kansas] High school students in inner-city Kansas City, Kansas, soon will get the chance to develop life and job skills, thanks to a new program at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church that has received funding from the Episcopal Church.A $35,000 Jubilee Ministry grant will fund the start-up this fall of “Youth in Transitions,” which the church’s priest, the Rev. Dixie Junk, described as a youth development program.The need that sparked the church’s grant application was simple – the local school district sends students home at 12:30 p.m. on Wednesdays to provide time for staff training. Through a series of meetings with community groups, church members heard that there was a real need to find something meaningful for high school students to do during that time.The new program will provide selected students help in several areas:Life skills – personal finance, nutrition and healthy eating, and communications;Job-readiness skills – how to complete a job application, interviewing and networking;Community service training to become a volunteer in one of the church’s existing food ministry programs – food pantry, Saturday morning hot breakfast and community garden; andQuiet time for reflection, something school officials identified as a missing element in many homes.About half of the one-year grant is earmarked for hiring a part-time program coordinator, which Junk said is the key to the program’s success. This person will oversee the program’s selection of student participants and recruit the volunteers who will teach the skills classes.The rest of the grant funds will provide curriculum materials and technology equipment for instructors and students, as well as classroom tables and chairs.Junk said the church, which is located in the city’s urban core, will rely on volunteer labor and in-kind donations to convert some existing rooms, like an under-used library and chapel, into spaces where students can learn and study.Grant recognizes an innovative programThe Rev. Mark Stevenson, who became the Episcopal Church’s first domestic poverty missioner last September, oversees the Jubilee grants. He made a trip to St. Paul’s in late January to get a first-hand look at plans for the start-up of the new program.He said that St. Paul’s was selected from 59 applications because this program can be used by other churches around the country. “What we liked about this program was the ability for it to be replicated in different contexts,” Stevenson said.The grant committee was searching for a model ministry that showed innovation and creativity, had an educational component, and could be duplicated elsewhere.Junk said she has received support for the new program from Kansas City Mayor Mark Holland and Commissioner Ann Murguia. In a letter that accompanied the grant application, Holland praised the church’s outreach efforts that support its neighborhood and reach thousands of people each year. He said the youth start-up will bring “our kids up to speed on important job readiness and life skills that can be harder to come by in urban environments.”Murguia’s letter said St. Paul’s will fill a gap that currently isn’t being met by schools or the local community, to help “prepare young people for the realities of the work force and the responsibilities of citizenship.” She called St. Paul’s efforts “a great service and benefit to our city.”Junk said area employers told her some of their young employees lack the work and life skills the church’s program will teach. They have promised to send them to the church’s new program to catch up.She said government officials also have pledged their help in connecting businesses with the church to provide additional trainers and to enhance the course content.Culinary program is long-term goalJunk said that if St. Paul’s can find the money, they would like to provide an expansion of the successful Culinary Cornerstones chef training program operated by Episcopal Community Services, a social service agency of the Dioceses of Kansas and West Missouri.That program is based at Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral in Kansas City, Mo., and teaches high-end cooking skills to students whose backgrounds (often drug addiction or jail time) make them hard to employ. The program helps place graduates in restaurant kitchens across the metro-Kansas City area.To make that expansion a reality, St. Paul’s would need nearly $20,000 to buy restaurant-grade equipment for its kitchen, and another $125,000 to put in a parking lot to accommodate events that Culinary Cornerstones students cater as part of their training. On the church grounds there is room for only about a dozen cars now, so the church relies on street parking for Sunday services and weekday outreach efforts.In the meantime, Junk hopes they can begin to offer training for other kinds of restaurant jobs, such as waiters and waitresses, which can provide meaningful jobs for high school students.She admits expanding into the culinary program is ambitious, given that St. Paul’s has a small membership, operates with a barebones budget and receives financial help from the diocese. But if the Youth in Transitions program is a success, Junk hopes it can serve as leverage and incentive for community partners to want to make the culinary training possible. Episcopal Community Services has pledged to help make those connections.Junk said this grant goes a long way to showing others that St. Paul’s is committed to helping create a better neighborhood. “The larger our position as a vital member of this community, the more likely there will be resources to help us,” she said. “There will be more people in our corner fighting to make sure we make it.”Encouraging people to work with the poorStevenson said that one of his roles as the church’s domestic poverty missioner is to encourage more people to work directly with poor people, as St. Paul’s already does and will expand with its new program. “Our goal is that one in four people will work with the poor,” he said, “and one in four parts of the budget and every program.”Cuts to the Episcopal Church budget in recent years mean there is less money at the denominational level to put into this work, but Stevenson said “that’s a good thing. It gets us out of our silos and celebrates the fact that all good ministry happens at the local level.”Stevenson saw the transformational power of fighting poverty when he was canon to the ordinary in the Diocese of Louisiana when Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans. “When you sit with someone who had nothing and lost that, who had a job and lost that, then you see how God starts working in their lives,” he said. But it also transforms the lives of people who help. “When you start living this, you are changed.”Stevenson said he wants to offer Episcopal Church members a new approach in the ministry to help people get out of poverty. Instead of starting with the needs of the community, he suggests looking at the passion of people who are ready to give. In that way, well-intentioned programs don’t wither when people have no interest in participating in them “It’s more about helping people determine what their treasure is, so they can begin to give that away,” he said.“The reason I’m in this job is to define new ways to help you do the work God is calling you to,” he said.— Melodie Woerman is the director of communications for the Diocese of Kansas. Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Students to develop life, job skills through Kansas youth program Tags Rector Martinsville, VA center_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Belleville, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth & Young Adults Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Press Release Service An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs last_img read more

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El Comité Conjunto de Nominaciones emite una Convocatoria de Discernimiento…

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Events Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Collierville, TN Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Rector Tampa, FL Posted Aug 13, 2014 [El 13 de agosto de 2014] El Comité Conjunto de Nominaciones de la Episcopal Iglesia para la Elección del Obispo Presidente (JNCPB) ha publicado una Convocatoria de Discernimiento y Perfil para la 27º Obispo Presidente de la Iglesia EpiscopalEl perfil se encuentra aquí  y en español aquí   y FrancesEntre hoy y el 30 de septiembre, cualquier miembro de la Iglesia Episcopal puede presentar el nombre de un obispo al  Comité [JNCPB] a quien crean deba ser considerado para la nominación, a través del correo electrónico que aparece en una Convocatoria de Discernimiento y Perfil. El JNCPB informará a los obispos cuyos nombres se han presentado y les informará de que si desean participar del proceso de discernimiento, deberán presentar sus materiales, según se especifica en una Convocatoria de Discernimiento y Perfil, del 1 al 31 de octubre El JNCPB anunciará sus nominados a principios de mayo de 2015.Según el JNCPB, el perfil tiene la intención de pintar un cuadro de las habilidades, cualidades y dones que la Iglesia busca en su próximo Obispo Presidente a la luz de lo que la Iglesia puede parecer en la próxima década, para ayudar a los obispos, diputados y posibles candidatos a que disciernan qué obispos pueden ser llamados al ministerio de Obispo Presidente y para ayudar al JNCPB en el discernimiento de los potenciales candidatos. Para ayudar en este proceso, el año pasado el JNCPB elaboró y distribuyó una encuesta en toda la iglesia. La síntesis de las más de 5.200 respuestas ayudó a desarrollar el perfil.El JNCPB está compuesto por un miembro laico, un sacerdote o diácono, y un obispo elegido de cada una de las nueve provincias de la Iglesia Episcopal, además de dos representantes de la juventud, designados por el Presidente de la Cámara de los Diputados, la Revda. Gay Jennings. Los diputados de la  Convención General y los obispos sirven un término de tres años para concluir en la clausura de la Convención General de 2015 en Salt Lake City. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service El Comité Conjunto de Nominaciones emite una Convocatoria de Discernimiento y Perfil para el 27 Obispo Presidente Episcopal Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GA last_img read more

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Jóvenes adultos episcopales sirven como misioneros en toda la Comunión…

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY [6 de octubre de 2014] Jóvenes adultos – incluyendo seis que servirán durante un segundo año – que representan a 18 diócesis de la Iglesia Episcopal están sirviendo como misioneros en el Cuerpo de Servicio de Jóvenes Adultos (YASC) durante el término  de 2014-2015 en lugares de toda la Comunión Anglicana.YASC es un ministerio para jóvenes adultos episcopales, en edades de 21 a 30 años, que están interesados en explorar su fe en  nuevas formas de vivir y servir en comunidades alrededor de la Comunión Anglicana.El Revdo. David Copley, Oficial de Personal de Misión, señaló que si bien las tareas de día a día varían en cada lugar, las experiencias de los “YASCers” cambia la vida de uno. “YASC coloca a jóvenes adultos en la vida de la Comunión Anglicana en todo el mundo y en el trabajo diario de una comunidad local”, explicó.Cada “YASCer” mantiene un blog, detallando sus servicios, reflexiones y aventuras. Elizabeth Boe, Oficial de la Red Global de la Iglesia Episcopal y ex voluntaria de YASC que sirvió en Tanzania, compartió que los blogs ofrecen un medio ideal para conectar con otros a través de la Iglesia Episcopal y en todo el mundo.Conozca a los “YASCers”Normalmente trabajan en la administración, la comunicación, la educación y el desarrollo; las diócesis de origen, las asignaciones y las direcciones del blog de los 18 misioneros “YASC” están aquí:Fred Addy, Diócesis de DallasFred sirve en el  Hogar Escuela en Heredia, en la  Diócesis de Costa Rica. Su blog.Joey Anderson, Diócesis de Massachusetts y  Diócesis de MissouriJoey sirve  en el  Instituto Rural Asiático en Japón. Su  blog.Will Bryant, Diócesis de Oeste de Carolina del NorteWill es misionero de YASC por segundo año y sirve en el Centro de Refugiados de Joel Nafuma en Roma, Italia, en la Convocación de Iglesias  Episcopales en Europa. Sublog.Paul Daniels, Diócesis de Carolina del NortePaul es misionero de YASC por segundo año y continua su ministerio en la  Cathedral of St. Michael y  St. George en Grahamstown, Sudáfrica. Su blog.Justin Davis, Diócesis de Virginia y Diócesis del Sur de   VirginiaJustin sirve con la  Misión de Gente de la Mar en Hong Kong. Su blog.Elizabeth Duque Echeverry, Diócesis de ColombiaElizabeth sirve en Atención y Asesoramiento Ágape en la  Diócesis del Oeste de Maseno, Kenia. Su blog.Maurice Dyer, Diócesis de  El Camino RealMaurice es misionero de YASC por segundo año y sirve en el Instituto para la Sanación de Recuerdos en Cape Town, Sudáfrica. Su blog.Carolyn Hockey, Diócesis de OhioCarolyn trabaja en la Oficina Provincial de Burundi de la  Iglesia Anglicana en Bujumbura. Su blog.David Holton, Diócesis de Nueva York David enseña en el  Easter College en la Ciudad de Baguio en la  Diócesis Norte Central de Filipinas. Su blog.Kirsten Lowell, Diócesis de Maine Kirsten actúa como auxiliar administrativa a cargo de proyectos especiales en la  Diócesis de Uruguay. Su blog.Willie Lutes, Diócesis de Dakota del Sur Willie sirve como asistente de comunicaciones en la  Red del Medio Ambiente de la Iglesia Anglicana en Sudáfrica y en la Red del Medio Ambiente de la Comunión Anglicana en la Ciudad del Cabo, Sudáfrica. Su blog.Kayla Massey, Diócesis de Alta Carolina del Sur   Kayla sirve en el Centro E-Care en Halsema en la Diócesis del  Norte Central de Filipinas. Su blog.Rachel McDaniel, Diócesis del Oeste de Tennessee Rachel trabaja con los ministerios de las mujeres y niños en la Diócesis del Sudeste de Brasil. Su blog.Hannah Perls, Diócesis de OlympiaHannah es misionera de YASC por segundo año y continúa su ministerio en la  Fundación Cristosal en El Salvador. Su blog.Carlin Van Schaik, Diócesis del Noroeste TexasCarlin es misionera de YASC por segundo año y sirve en la Iglesia Episcopal en Filipinas. Su blog.Alan Yarborough, Diócesis de la Alta Carolina del Sur  y Diócesis del Oeste de  Carolina del Norte. Alan es misionero de YASC por segundo año y continúa su ministerio de desarrollo económico y comunitario en Cange, Haití. Su blog.Ryan Zavacky, Diócesis de Míchigan del EsteRyan enseña en la Escuela de la Santa Cruz en Grahamstown, Sudáfrica. Su blog.Todos los blogs se encuentran aquí. 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Deputies vote: Remove the Confederate flag

first_img John Townsend says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ron Wendell says: Michael Mangiapane says: July 4, 2015 at 12:40 am Joseph I so agree with you. You can Not rewrite history, We are all sheep following now. Let it be. We are being racially divided now. I did read that the vows to marry will be changed to ‘couple’ instead of husband and wife?? I am sorry…why would I have to change who I am? Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Comments navigation Newer comments The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group July 1, 2015 at 8:24 pm So – are we going to sponge the name of Robert Edward Lee from the list of vestrymen of the Episcopal church in Lexington, Va, and perhaps others? Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Knoxville, TN July 1, 2015 at 8:16 pm Really? So, there is only one way out of this folks. Forgiveness! To forgive and be forgiven are both acts of love, kindness and mercy, which puts us on the path of healing, individually and collectively. I agree with Doug Desper’s comments, but if people choose to be offended by their own understanding of symbols and history there is nothing you or I can do to make difference. I love Jesus’ statement “if your eye offends you, pluck it out” and I think it was meant to be taken as absurd advice, which is designed to help us change the outcome of our own thinking. Who in their right mind pluck out an eye; but more importantly this ridiculous proposition of Jesus places the pure benefit of being offended entirely upon the one feeling the offense. How can the one who retains the offense ever be free to “respect the dignity of every human being?” To put it kindly, some people retain the memory of pain for any type of gain that there is essentially no insight.While I, myself, taking inventory could point to events in my own life where the natural and human reaction would be magnify the offense, I am still the only one who has the ability to get over my feelings of anger, self pity, resentment, and despair which leads to a limited world view that others are responsible for my misery, low self esteem, feeling of unworthiness. I really believe God loves us and wants to see the creation live in harmony where everyone succeeds at living, Oh, sure, there is such a thing as real victims, victimizers, and heroes; but the drama only serves a function of definition and as soon as we realize we don’t have to be stuck, then we are finally becoming moving into maturity. The real measurement of our success is the shortening interval of time it takes to realize that we have been playing and living out these very dangerous roles; I don’t think I’m too presumptuous to say that there are too many heroes at convention that want to “treat the symptom” by the simple removal of an “evil” symbol. Submit an Event Listing The Rev.Canon John E. Lawrende says: July 1, 2015 at 8:52 am The windows wont be destroyed. Rev. Hall said they would be put on display about the windows and their context. http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/acts-of-faith/wp/2015/06/25/washington-national-cathedral-dean-its-time-to-remove-stained-glass-windows-with-confederate-flags/ Fred Loving says: July 1, 2015 at 12:48 pm Does this mean I am a racist if I place a flag on the grave of my great-grandfather on Memorial Day?Will I be turned away at the church door if a flag is on my lapel pin? Will the priest refuse the burial rite if a flag is on my coffin and a uniformed Confederate honor guard is present? Those of us that honor our Confederate ancestors feel we are following the commandment ” honor thy father and thy mother”. July 2, 2015 at 11:14 am I agree! History is a record of our past. We can’t out run it, nor should we. The windows stand as a pictorial history of our country. As such it just like a museum piece, and the cathedral is partly museum. Let it be! Lest we all forget and commit the same mistakes again. July 1, 2015 at 6:42 pm Where do you get the idea that President Obama is not a Christian? He is a Christian and was a member of Trinity United Church of Christ (of which I am an ordained minister) for 20 years. He’s a devout Christian. Rector Albany, NY July 2, 2015 at 8:08 am To equate the Confederate flag with the Nazi flag, is a horrible thing to even think of.In Germany it was so horrible:1. There was not a dictator, Hitler.2. There was not a goal to own the world.3. There was not a goal to destroy a entire religious group, the Jewish nation.Need I say more at this time.I am so very sorry you have this idea. Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York June 30, 2015 at 10:10 pm 1. If they take the stained glass windows out of the Cathedral Church of Sts. Peter & Paul, how are they any better than the Moslem extremists who destroy statuary of previous regimes?2. I will continue to fly the Battle Flag on General Robert E Lee’s birthday and on Confederate Memorial Day. My kinsmen fought in the 3rd Arkansas Infantry, I Corps, Army of Northern Virginia — and so far as we know, none of them owned any slaves. July 1, 2015 at 1:37 pm As a Southerner with a written Virginia family history of 11 generations I DO agree that the Confederate battle flag needs to find a rest. It has been co-opted and used by hate groups and people ignorant of history. However, as it rests one needs to recall that the Civil War was so multi-faceted that to single out the now over-used/poorly used battle flag is a drop in what should instead be a comprehensive look. The Northern States were by no means pure as snow. Northern and Southern accounts all tell of Northern army plunder and intentional destruction of Southern civilian targets and homes. “The Burning” by John Heatwole tells of the sheer theft, destruction, sadism, and disregard of Gen. Sheridan’s Union troops through the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia in October 1864. What did the Union flag look like to those countless thousands who entered the winter of December 1864 with no homes, no food, no mills to earn money — nothing left as smoke pyres billowed from Winchester down to Roanoke? Ban the Union flag now? Where were/are the Episcopalian cries for reparations for countless thousands of Virginia non-combatants who were ruined? It didn’t happen…and won’t so long as Political Correctness is the main information source of life. The Emancipation Proclamation gave the guarantee by President Lincoln that the Southern states could KEEP slaves so long as they came back into the Union within 100 days. It did not end slavery where it existed in the North. So, why is that document so celebrated? Selective reading to look for a hero and justification… the fine print didn’t catch enough attention, though.The greatest draft resistance of the War happened in New York’s multi-day draft riots where African Americans were lynched in the city, and a black children’s orphanage burned down with many fatalities. So, ban the US flag waved through the streets during that riot? General Lee inherited slaves, deplored slavery and wanted a decent end to it rather than the impetuous “NOW!” yelled for by abolitionists and loud voices in Washington — with army bayonets to back up their cause. The South resisted through its militias because of the chaos that such a massive upheaval would create: collapse economically, socially, and as an independent nation. The North benefited as much from slavery as the South and there were very few in the North that wanted to be a part of restructuring their lives to absorb millions of instantly freed slaves and ruined Southern families. BTW: Lee freed his inherited slaves right after the War and knelt down with a former slave in St. John’s Church, Richmond to receive Holy Communion. General Grant held on to his slaves much longer after the War. My main gripe with symbolic gestures is that 150 years later our moral “high ground” is really not so “high” after all. It has reduced – insultingly simplistically so – that War to celebrated Union liberators and ignorant racist Southerners. It forgets these glaring truths…and this next one:Our lives are just as thoroughly wrapped in the misery of others who provide our common goods and services as ancestors 150 years ago. Today’s hidden slaves work for pennies to make our clothing and other goods — a new captive servitude. Like 150 years ago we can’t just “stop it NOW” because we are so intertwined and dependent on their futile lives. One wonders what our United States flag means to them. So, friends — we ARE right now just like the South of the Civil War. We rely on the misery of others in every fabric of life. They – and we – are trapped together. Should the Federal Government arm itself today (as 150 years ago) to forcibly ruin millions of lives to create social change NOW? Are you willing to be ruined? Are you willing to create a refugee plan for the millions who will have lost their labor? How many can come and live with you if the Federal Government declares today that it all ends…NOW.In sum, my plea is to be more comprehensive and less proud of our own high ground. Yep, put the battle flag away…but also let’s bury any pretense of moral superiority over the people of that time. It just ain’t so bumper-sticker …or GC Resolution simple. July 1, 2015 at 5:29 pm This is the wrong way to go about righting a bad thing. The National Cathedral is proving the old adage, history is written by the victors. In this case, it is re-writing it, pretending it never happened. That is dangerous. This flag, as awful as it today, is part of our history. We need to know where we came from, SO IT DOES NOT HAPPEN AGAIN. Instead of removing it, there should be discussions about it. June 30, 2015 at 8:41 pm I don’t think it’s necessary to destroy the windows. They serve as art/pictorial history of our nation, good or bad. Those who want to change the truth of our nation will be like those who say that the concentration camp never happen, Jews and gypsy never were killed. We say that God can forgive, but yet as a church we are having a PR campaign. We need to own it. not cover it up for the future. Alton Aimar says: Joseph F Foster says: July 1, 2015 at 4:59 pm Bravo!This was remarkably well written. I wish my fellow Episcopalians in the New Orleans area (who have been trolling Facebook with holier-than-thou garbage) could read and accept this. I have only one point of contention here. The flag. I feel that if a local community wishes to eliminate the flag, then so be it. If a local community decides to keep it in memory of all of the pain, suffering and human wretchedness that not only was perpetrated then but after and today, then they have the right to have their decision respected. The self-righteous, do-gooder crap that the church tries to push on everyone else all the time needs to stop. People deserve to have agency and communities ought to be respected as having agency. Judith Clausen says: July 1, 2015 at 5:03 pm That’s ludicrous and rather immoral of you. Andrew Poland says: Andrew Poland says: Scott Elliott says: November 27, 2015 at 10:15 am To compare an American flag to the swastika is a jnee jerk liberal farce. It was ships flying the striped flag that brought slaves to our shores. The Government of the south committed no holocaust. Nor did it invade any country. Why did the U.S. Congress pass a resolution that it was fighting the war for union not slavery. Read Lincoln’s inaugural address he said he would invade the South for taxes… Judith Clausen says: Rector Washington, DC July 1, 2015 at 6:02 pm I am a life long Episcopalian , I have been disappointed on several fronts this week as we look at an ever evolving church. I am conservative by nature and always was proud of the inclusive nature of the church.I have found less tolerance for my view point this week. I think removing the windows is not necessary and try’s to eliminate part of the history of our nation unnecessarily …. I think this level of cleansing losses the balance we are looking for….. Not sure there is a place in the Episcopal church for my way of thinking. I think the changes being made at General Convention are less about what’s good for the Anglican communion than capitalizing on a win at SCOTUS and instead of discerning what’s best we move forward because its expedient …. Sad day for me. May God Bless the Episcopal church Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Vivian Ruth Sawyer says: July 6, 2015 at 4:39 pm Doug, if gargoyles are “evil statuary,” to quote you, then why do they adorn all the major European cathedrals dedicated to the glory of God and His kingdom on earth? Come on, do your homework. Janson’s History of Art… July 2, 2015 at 12:27 am Here is an alternative to how history can be handled:http://dreammarcheson.com/#Home July 1, 2015 at 9:21 am I have family from the North & the South, I do the history of both of these families. Records are being found from that time & I am also meeting family members with records from that time.History has always been a very, very important subject. Now you want to wipe out one of the major parts of the history of the United States. You know no matter what you do it will always be part of our history.I am an a Episcopalian, I ask do we really have the money to waste doing this?I also ask since Mr. Obama is not a Christian where does he have any right to come in a church & say “Take out that window.”I will end with that the National Cathedral is still & will always be a Episcopal Church. Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Bath, NC July 1, 2015 at 9:11 am The Christian faith itself is full of less than stellar behavior, sordid history and the like, so for TEC to be singling out the War Between the States, The Southern States and the actual history of the United States for its less than Stellar past seems very disingenuous to me. Hate hypocrisy on any level, but from TEC, I find interesting. July 1, 2015 at 9:39 pm Thank you, Andrew. Obviously, the commenter to whom you responded knows not the first thing about those windows. Or much else pertinent, either, it seems. LTC Gene Moser says: July 1, 2015 at 6:39 pm I agree. They need to come down. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Charlotte Payne Wright says: Vivian Ruth Sawyer says: Rector Martinsville, VA Andrew Poland says: Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID July 2, 2015 at 9:57 am A factual error – the Georgia state flag was changed in 2003 and no longer incorporates any Confederate symbols. The only state whose flag remains explicitly Confederate is Mississippi. A 2001 referendum to replace that flag, led by former Governor Winter, was defeated 2-1. Currently, as a result of the Charleston shootings, there is a new push to replace the state flag with either a new design or with the Magnolia flag, which, while it was the official state flag during the Civil War, does not incorporate any Confederate symbols. The flags of Alabama and Florida incorporate a red St Andrew cross, which bears a relation (intended by the originators) to the Stars and Bars but is not the same as any Confederate flag. Will the Mississippi state flag be withheld from display in the Cathedral until such time as it may be replaced? As much as I want to see it replaced by a more inclusive one, I have a concern about that policy. Willard Deal says: General Convention, General Convention 2015 Associate Rector Columbus, GA July 1, 2015 at 12:50 pm I think that Jay Roberts expressed very well the problem with removing the stained glass window that depicts a small Confederate battle flag, et al is that it is a ¨slippery slope¨– who else do you start removing from display in museums and historic sites? I do not deny that the emblem has become associated with hate and hate groups. I do question the wisdom of this flurry of political correctness that dances along the surface of our real racial problems. Denying history, as has been elequently stated in many of the comments above, does not move us forward, Keep the windows where they are. Rector Belleville, IL Jeffrey Jones says: Susan Irwin says: Vaughn Wolff says: Bill Simpson says: Martha Dudrow says: robert Hunter says: Doug Desper says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Jay Roberts says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME July 1, 2015 at 9:33 am It’s history. This is an over reach, rediculious and calls attention to micro portion of an amazing structure. Personally, I detest the star and bars. This removal of tiny panes of glass just seems hopelessly lost in the “letter of the strong urging.” This “teachable moment” will be lost when the glass is changed. We can discuss race without sanitizing reality. By Pat McCaughanPosted Jun 30, 2015 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 July 1, 2015 at 10:13 pm This sounds like a inherent nationalism or political correctness run amok. The American flag stirs the same emotions and feelings to Central Americans who knew the US flag as the power behind military dictators, coups and killings. It is also the power behind the drone guided missiles that tear apart Pakistani and Afghani families. Also let’s not forget Native Americans being exterminated and forced onto reservations by the power behind the US flag. Yes if we are going to be guided by history let’s not forget the negative history behind the U.S. Flag and we can remove that flag as well. July 1, 2015 at 2:34 pm Reading Rev. Hall’s own words on the matter is a must:“These windows (along with their inscriptions) seek to reframe the Civil War and present the two generals as saintly, exemplary Christians. . . .“The Lee-Jackson bay was installed in 1953 after a long campaign by the United Daughters of the Confederacy both to fund and approve them. The United Daughters of the Confederacy is a group mainly concerned with fostering respect for southern heritage. But in proposing these windows they went beyond heritage and created a memorial that puts a decidedly saintly spin on two leaders of the Confederate Army. The inscriptions portray them as exemplary Christian gentlemen. But the windows contain no reference to the sin of slavery which both men fought—and one died—to uphold. . . .“It is time for those windows to go and live elsewhere in our buildings as part of a HISTORICAL DISPLAY. It is time for us to commission new ones for the nave that will tell the full, painful, yet hopeful story of race and justice in America. . . . (emphasis mine)“Washington Nation Cathedral is called, as our nation’s most visible church, to lead the faith community and our nation in healing America by facing into racism, its history, and its encampment in our own hearts. We cannot do that if our building only tells one side of the story. We cannot do that while the Confederate battle flag shines in our windows. All our artworks, like our scriptures and those who preach on them, must always strive to tell the truth. And sadly, our understanding of truth emerges only over time. . . . “Do we have the courage to revisit our assumptions and admit when they are inadequate or false? Can we risk admitting that we can no longer live with the contradiction between justice and oppression, that we can no longer celebrate both slavery and freedom in the same space?”http://www.cathedral.org/worship/sermonTexts/grh20150628_1115.shtml July 2, 2015 at 8:07 am I’m willing to bet that those memorials in Berlin do not display the swastika! That the flag down! Rector Shreveport, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET George Crump says: Michael J. Brembs says: July 1, 2015 at 11:55 pm Christ Church in Old Towne Alexandria, VA stopped Sons of Confederate Veterans in CSA replica uniforms from going onto their property, as well as their flags, during a planned and approved memorial service on Confederate Memorial Day, 2013. They allowed a wreath laying on the Confederate Mound (which contains the remains of some 30-33 dead, mostly Confederate military, but at least two civilians, who died during the war period when the City of Alexandria was occupied by Yankee forces) which was performed by members of UDC and others who were not clad in Confederate attire. The church has advised that flags will not be permitted on church grounds. I wrote the rector a letter asking if this included a U. S. Flag (covering the coffin of a U. S. veteran), but did not receive a reply. A wreath is laid at the mound each year (with red and white flowers and ribbons) and a wreath is laid inside on or near Robert E. Lee’s birthday. If you want a Confederate flag and/or a uniformed Confederate honor guard, you might think about going somewhere else. July 1, 2015 at 6:37 pm This is coming from a Dean whose cathedral charges $10 admission, employs evil statuary (gargoyles), and who hosted Muslim prayers with CAIR as invitees? Nothing incongruent about that….. shannon Fontsinr says: July 1, 2015 at 8:43 pm There are three models of the “confederate flag” and all were used at different times for different reasons. Perhaps one of the other models that are more acceptable could replace the one most disliked. The remainder of the window would be maintained. Comments are closed. July 1, 2015 at 4:50 pm So I guess Suwannee should be torn down and all degrees from it rendered invalid right? I mean after all, it was built by Confederate Generals. This is ridiculous and stupid. The church wants to waste time on a vote like this, and bickering over crap like this when we have much bigger issues at hand. The past happened. It’s there. You cannot delete it, you cannot take it back. It is what it is. Move on.How can we even expect to be taken seriously? Lex Lindsey says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Ellie Lopez says: July 2, 2015 at 11:27 am Do you have a list of books you want us to burn also! Any private archives that reside in our churches or our libraries and museums that need to be rounded up and piled up and burnt, like Hitler had done in Germany? Those windows need to stay as part of our history. The window as a whole tells a larger story that needs to be remembered. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Press Release Service Bob Adams says: July 1, 2015 at 12:51 pm The Egyptians tried to erase history a time or two. I think Amenhotep IV, or “Akhenaten” may have been the victim of such an attempt. It is better to preserve history than to destroy it unless it becomes an idol of worship. July 1, 2015 at 7:05 am “Will you strive for justice and peace among all people, and respect the dignity of every human being?” Go ahead and display your CSA battle flag in private to honor your traditions. Doing such in public violates this (your) baptismal covenant and “flags” the bigots amongst us. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments (53) Submit a Press Release Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Tampa, FL Jim Welsh says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab C. Brooks Stamm says: July 1, 2015 at 12:39 am Art works in the Cathedral tell stories, so we are now modifying the story?Art Museums need to watch their back, before people who don’t understand art want to paint over objections material.Will those who destroy the art in places of worship give the person or their estates back their donation that paid for the art.I am pretty sure there is a gargoyle at the National Cathedral depicting a Peeping Tom(at children)… Is that coming down??? June 30, 2015 at 11:03 pm I agree with the comments above. Removing the stained glass windows is not necessary nor will it change the past. We know slavery was wrong and it is too easy for people to pass judgment on history. I do not think it’s fair to the people back then, and I don’t think it’s useful to us now. Joseph makes a great point. Should we obliterate history because we don’t like it? Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Doug Desper says: Rick Gibbs says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Comments navigation Newer comments Rector Hopkinsville, KY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ginger OConnemm says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT C. Brooks Stamm says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Laurie Welch says: July 1, 2015 at 11:28 pm If we do not remember the past, we are doomed to repeat it.Leave the windows! Put a plaque on the wall explaining that we want never to forget our history and we want always to be able to learn from it.In Berlin, they have a memorial everywhere in the city where a Jewish person was murdered. They are everywhere. Should they whitewash their past? I would feel very uncomfortable if they did. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel George Crump says: July 1, 2015 at 3:09 pm Simply replace the confederate flag with the one that mattered historically: the white one. Joyce Wood says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH July 1, 2015 at 9:39 am Let’s not stop here! Let’s completely white-wash history! Remove the windows and also have the General Convention excommunicate Robert E. Lee, Jefferson Davis, the Rt. Rev. Leonidas Polk, and all other southerners who supported the Confederacy and were slave owners. Then, we will have altered history, ended racism, and feel better about ourselves! Oh, and while you are at it, let’s remove Dean Hall! June 30, 2015 at 8:59 pm What a shame, trying to erase history is not the way we move forward. We need to recognize it for what it is, the past of our country. Removing the stained glass windows is not going to erase what has happened. Should we remove all the images of our founding fathers that were also slave holders? Jefferson, Washington, Madison and countless others were all slave owners. Should we remove their statues and images because they engaged in this horrible institution? July 1, 2015 at 7:30 pm I have no choice but to equate the Confederate Flag with the Nazi Flag. Should either of them be flown, shown, adored? If it’s in a stained glass window, it’s not just a matter or history’; it becomes a matter of worship. The Dean is absolutely right in removing it, and the Bishop should refuse to enter the Cathedral until it is gone. Tags Marjorie McKee says: October 18, 2016 at 11:35 pm In Austria they are now preparing to demolish Hitler’s House so it will not grow to be a place of pilgrimage for neo-nazis—the same needs to happen to all confederate memorials Douglas Kearley says: Deputies vote: Remove the Confederate flag The Very Rev. Gary Hall, dean of the Washington National Cathedral, has vowed to remove the stained glass window bearing the Confederate flag.[Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City] The House of Deputies on June 29 approved in an overwhelming voice vote Resolution D044, which “strongly urges all persons, along with public, governmental, and religious institutions, to discontinue the display of the Confederate battle flag.”The deputies join a growing number of people in sacred and secular organizations calling for discontinuation of the flag, including U.S. President Barack Obama.Obama called for the flag’s removal while eulogizing the Rev. Clementa Pinckney, one of nine African-Americans killed during a Charleston, South Carolina, Bible study by a self-described white supremacist.In recent weeks the Very Rev. Gary Hall, dean of the Washington National Cathedral, has also vowed to remove images of the Confederacy from the cathedral, the official seat of the presiding bishop.Deputy Betsy Baumgarten of Mississippi urged the house to support the measure, noting that symbols “help to shape our belief and our continued understanding of God and the world. To continue to allow the Confederate flag to have a place in our churches says something about The Episcopal Church.”The Mississippi state flag incorporates the Confederate battle flag in its design, while the Georgia state flag is a modification of the Confederate “stars and bars” flag. The National Cathedral displays the flags of all the states in its nave.While acknowledging that the symbol is for some a sign of their heritage, “for many more it has and continues to be a symbol of slavery, racial injustice and violence – and now more than ever, a sign of the white supremacist movement. The Confederate Battle Flag has no place in a church that calls all baptized persons to respect dignity of every human being.”The resolution went a step further, challenging “us to get out of our churches and engage our public and government institutions in a conversation about such a toxic symbol of hate having any place in our current civic life,” she said when presenting the measure to the house.Several other deputies, including the Rev. Susan Haynes of Northern Indiana and the Rev. Canon Victoria Heard of Dallas, also urged approval.Recently, the Very Rev. Anthony P. Clark, dean of the Cathedral Church of St. Luke in Orlando, Florida, said in a statement that, after removing flags for cleaning, he would not return the Confederate flag to the cathedral proper, according to the Rev. Jabriel Ballentine.“If the church is to be one like it’s supposed to be, then this is a divisive issue,” said Ballentine, 34, rector of St. John the Baptist Church in Orlando. “How can we be authentic unless we do everything we can to uproot it from ourselves?“If one group is saying they’re not bound by the prayers of the people, when we pray that we all may be one, what are we really saying?”Baumgarten said that removal of the flag “is only a step in starting the hard conversation we need to have about racism, and about acceptance of diversity in dismantling institutions that tear down some while lifting up others.“It shows that The Episcopal Church is on board with the conversation that is happening on a national level right now,” Baumgarten said.“As a deputation from Mississippi, we felt we needed to speak to this issue. But it isn’t just our issue. We call on the whole church as the people of God to join with us to remove this symbol of hate and oppression and to work towards bringing equality to all people.”— The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service and part of the ENS team reporting on the 78th General Convention. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AKlast_img read more

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Archbishop of Canterbury on the EU, refugees and religious violence

first_img Archbishop of Canterbury, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Tampa, FL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Job Listing Submit an Event Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID [Anglican Communion News Service] The Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, has made front page news in the UK with an interview given to The House magazine which covers political affairs. The interview, which was conducted in the House of Lords, addressed the forthcoming UK referendum about whether or not the UK should leave or remain a member of the European Union; the refugee crisis, and tackling religious violence.On the EU question, Archbishop Welby did not come down on one-side or the other. “You can’t say ‘God says you must vote this way or that way’” he told journalist Daniel Bond. “I don’t think there is one correct Christian view, one way or the other.”The Archbishop said that fear about what may happen as a result of the referendum was “legitimate”, saying: “Fear is a valid emotion. Fear of what happens if we leave, fear of what happens if we stay. You can understand why that really matters. Fear is legitimate.”But he said that he wanted the question to become “a really visionary debate about what our country looks like” with input from those advocating that Britain leaves and those who wish to remain.But it was Archbishop Welby’s comments on the refugee crisis that made the headlines in Britain’s newspapers this morning. Britain, he said, “has this extraordinary history, going back hundreds of years, of outward-looking, confident, often wonderful work around the world.“At the moment we’re one of the most effective people on international development, we’re one of the most effective people on international trade, we lead the world on tackling modern slavery, and we have huge skills and gifts to bring.”And he went on to welcome the “absolutely superb” work done by the British government in the Syrian refugee camps; but he described the UK’s policy of resettling 20,000 refugees in the UK by 2020 as “very slim” compared to the “extraordinary” efforts of Germany.“A problem of this scale can only be dealt with by a response on an equally grand scale right across Europe, and we have to play our part,” Archbishop Welby said.“We have to be careful. I’m aware of the complexity. The Government is rightly concerned about effectively subsidising people smuggling. That is quite proper, that could make everything worse.“But we can’t pretend we’re not part of this issue. We’ve got to find ways of taking our share of the load.”But he was conscious, too, of those opposed to increased refugees being admitted to the country. “There is a tendency to say ‘those people are racist’, which is just outrageous, absolutely outrageous.“Fear is a valid emotion at a time of such colossal crisis. This is one of the greatest movements of people in human history. Just enormous. And to be anxious about that is very reasonable.“In fragile communities particularly – and I’ve worked in many areas with very fragile communities over my time as a clergyman – there is a genuine fear: what happens about housing? What happens about jobs? What happens about access to health services? There is a genuine fear. And it is really important that that fear is listened to and addressed. There have to be resources put in place that address those fears.”On the battle against Daesh, Archbishop Welby has previously endorsed the British Government’s extension of its military campaign when it wanted to move from air strikes in Iraq to include targets in Syria too. But he said that the fight against Daesh would fail if was primarily a military one.“For the first time in centuries in this country – certainly going back to the 18th Century, arguably going back to the Glorious Revolution, 1688 – we find ourselves involved in conflict which has very, very significant theological aspects.“Not only in the Middle East but around the world, in all kinds of places, you’re seeing the outworking of that. You’re seeing it in Libya, in Nigeria, Somalia, Yemen, right across the Levant and Mesopotamia. And you’re seeing it with other faith traditions in other places, in the world, including Christians attacking minority faith groups, for instance in the Central African Republic.“And therefore an intelligent response to this must include theological and religious literacy, and an understanding of what drives people when they are caught up in religious ideas.”He continued: “The key thing is, if we are going to deal with extremism, mainstream religious leaders – which within many parts of the Islamic world includes governments – must be very, very clear about taking responsibility for the violence within their own traditions – as we must be as Christian leaders – and tackling that effectively.“That will mean places like Saudi Arabia tackling extremist thinking within their own tradition. Much support has come from within those countries, and they need to be challenged on that. They need to stamp out the support for the extremist views from within their own societies. That’s really important.”But this did not mean a secularisation of society with faith pushed to the edges. “We need to be confident about our own heritage, our Judeo-Christian heritage, whether we’re believers or not,” the Archbishop said. “That is what has shaped our own values, and we need to be confident in that.“But within that confidence there needs to be a hospitality, a clear sense of what we believe to be right or wrong, not based on temporary values of one kind of another that come and go, but on the eternal values that spring from the very roots of our culture. . .“I think the idea that you can separate secular life from religious life like separating . . . potatoes from peas on your plate, is just cloud cuckoo land. It’s not how human beings work. It denies the genuine inner sense of what a human being is.“If someone is genuinely committed to a faith tradition, whether you agree with it or not, that faith will guide and inspire everything they do. Everything. You can’t separate it. It doesn’t make any sense at all.“We’ve seen that in parts of Europe where they’ve tried to introduce very clear secularism, and it really doesn’t work. It hasn’t worked there, it won’t work here.”“We’ve got a society with many faiths in it. It doesn’t work by some sort of extraordinary mush that stands for nothing at all. It never has. That’s why I say we must be confident in our own tradition. And with that confidence be deeply hospitable of the other traditions we find living with us. Listen, share, engage, enjoy the fact that we are a diverse society.”Read the full interview on the Politics Home website. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Anglican Communion, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Bath, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate Diocese of Nebraska Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Refugees Migration & Resettlement Youth Minister Lorton, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA Posted Mar 11, 2016 Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Press Release Service Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Archbishop of Canterbury on the EU, refugees and religious violence Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Collierville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AKlast_img read more

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‘Stations of the Cross’ art exhibition follows Jesus’ path to…

first_img February 17, 2018 at 11:11 am Church is boring. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit an Event Listing Submit a Job Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Fred Garvin says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Comments (3) Featured Events Posted Feb 15, 2018 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The artwork “Stations” is made up of 14 columns of oil barrels painted different shades of red and two metal beams that appear to form a cross. It is on display at Trinity Church Wall Street in New York as part of the “Stations of the Cross” exhibition across Manhattan. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] Churches around the world will welcome Christians this Lent as they pray the Way of the Cross, following Jesus’ final path to crucifixion through 14 stations. In New York, that path of prayer will stretch the full length of Manhattan.A public art exhibition opened Feb. 14 on Ash Wednesday and will continue through Easter on April 1 that traces the Stations of the Cross from “Jesus Is Condemned” near the northern tip of Manhattan to “Entombment” at the National September 11 Memorial. At each stop, people of all faiths are invited to view works of art chosen to reflect on ways the Passion of Christ speaks to contemporary struggles against injustice.Trinity Church Wall Street is the 13th station in the “Stations of the Cross” exhibit across Manhattan. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceThe exhibition, titled simply “Stations of the Cross,” is sponsored by Trinity Church Wall Street and follows similar exhibitions in London in 2016 and Washington, D.C., in 2017.New York City is a great place to host this year’s edition, Trinity leaders said, suggesting that the metropolis is a greater hub of religious activity and reflection than it usually gets credit for.“I think that New York upsets the American religious imagination,” the Rev. John Moody said this week at Trinity. “It makes us search and go deep for meaning that the general culture doesn’t give us.”Moody, a retired priest who attends Trinity, was co-curator of “Stations of the Cross” with Aaron Rosen, a professor of religious studies at Rocky Mountain College who helped create and assemble this and the two prior versions of “Stations.” Although the subject matter is drawn from Christianity’s most solemn and foundational story, this “Stations of the Cross” is presented as an explicitly interfaith experience.Could aspects of Jesus’ story also speak to a Muslim or Jew or atheist? “I wanted to explore that sense of friction and tension for myself,” said Rosen, who is Jewish and married to an Episcopal deacon.To represent each station, Rosen selected from existing artworks, some that were hundreds of years old, while others were commissioned specifically for “Stations of the Cross.” In some cases, works created for the London or Washington exhibitions were brought to New York, with slight modifications.Curator Aaron Rosen and artist G. Roland Biermann stand in front of Biermann’s work “Stations” at Trinity Church Wall Street. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceTrinity, which Rosen called “sort of the radiating center” of the exhibition, was chose for the 13th station, “Jesus Is Taken Down From the Cross.” Just outside the church, next to its renowned cemetery, stand 14 tall columns of stacked oil barrels. The red columns are intersected by two steel beams that, when viewed from a certain angle, form a large cross. The artwork, titled “Stations,” was created by G. Roland Biermann, who painted the barrels in 14 different shades of red, signifying the color of blood.Standing with Rosen and church leaders in front of his artwork this week, Biermann said he also saw oil as a kind of blood of the Earth, and he noted its connections to the Middle East, the birthplace of Christianity. And oil can be a kind of currency, he said, a connotation that resonates even more with the artwork planted in the heart of New York’s financial district.One value of art is to provoke new perspectives on something we think we already know well, said the Rev. Winnie Varghese, Trinity’s director of justice and reconciliation. So, for Christians who are used to praying the Stations of the Cross every Lent, following the path of Jesus through these artworks is an opportunity to re-examine what the gospel story means for their faith and for the world around them.Varghese also sees something magnificent in turning this faith journey outward, as a public experience that brings people outdoors.“I love the idea of the city filled with prayer and intention in the way of the stations,” she said, and New York, especially, is suited for such an experience.“New York is a very religious city,” Varghese said. “We’re so religious, and we’re so diversely religious.”Rosen and his team found examples of that religious diversity while they were setting up the exhibition. At City College of New York, which is hosting the second station, “Jesus Takes Up the Cross,” the artwork “Hope” by Aithan Shapira features oversized life preservers made of concrete. Immigration is one of the themes of the exhibition, and Rosen saw in this station a connection to the plight of Syrian refugees braving dangerous sea voyages to make it to Greece.The concrete life preservers also were heavy, about 50 pounds each, and a couple of City College students helped move them into place. Both Muslim, they took a break to pray before finishing the work, Rosen said.Another highlight is the Chapel of the Good Shepherd at St. Peter’s Church, which is the eighth station, “Jesus Meets the Women of Jerusalem.” The chapel itself is a work of art, designed by Jewish artist Louise Nevelson in 1977 – another interfaith connection that Rosen hopes will resonate with visitors.“She could be one of the women of Jerusalem,” Rosen said.Trinity’s St. Paul’s Chapel, which was unscathed by the Sept. 11 terrorists attacks, served as a respite center for rescue and recovery workers laboring just a five-minute walk away at ground zero, where the September 11 Memorial now is located. The curators, in choosing the memorial as the final station, were sensitive to the complicated and deeply felt emotions still connected to that site more than 16 years after the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center.“The traditional Stations of the Cross intentionally ends in sorrow,” it said. “It is important to take time to dwell in this moment, not to recoil too quickly from grief. But it is also important to reflect – as a religiously and culturally diverse community – about how to re-enter life, to find meaning again after suffering.”Set within the footprints of the Twin Towers, the #911Memorial consists of two reflecting pools, each about an acre in size. https://t.co/qEwdJvz7ok pic.twitter.com/0MNb6X6XaM— 9/11 Memorial (@Sept11Memorial) January 24, 2018Trinity will host an opening program for the exhibition from 6 to 8 p.m. Feb. 15, featuring the curators, some of the artists and representatives from some of the locations chosen for the stations.If you are in Manhattan, you are invited to visit one or all of the 14 stations this Lent, or you can follow a virtual Way of the Cross with a podcast that provides commentary on each stop. To listen to the podcast, download the Alight: Art and the Sacred app for your phone on iTunes or Google Play.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Comments are closed. Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Pittsburgh, PA February 20, 2018 at 10:38 am What a Wonderful idea! I will be sharing this on facebook, everyone should see this exhibit! Rector Tampa, FL Lent Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Christine Scott says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VA February 16, 2018 at 9:53 am Quite a symbolic metaphor in the 21 Century: “I think that New York upsets the American religious imagination,” … “It makes us search and go deep for meaning that the general culture doesn’t give us.” … at Wall Street, the center of godless capitalism Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Collierville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LA Iván García says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Tags Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Washington, DC ‘Stations of the Cross’ art exhibition follows Jesus’ path to crucifixion at sites across Manhattan An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET last_img read more

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General Convention to consider new approach to Israel-Palestine issues promoting…

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis June 9, 2018 at 10:13 am Need to edit to ‘made aware of what was and wasn’t acceptable’ and to add that I and other colleagues have messed up on cultural norms – one thing I did recently was to eat in public around Muslims fasting during Ramadan, and that’s just rude. Director of Music Morristown, NJ A Palestinian woman makes her way June 1 through an Israeli checkpoint in Bethlehem in the occupied West Bank to attend Friday prayer of the holy fasting month of Ramadan in Jerusalem’s Al-Aqsa Mosque. Photo: Reuters[Episcopal News Service] A group of bishops and deputies who were asked to find a way to navigate the often-thorny discussions of Episcopal Church policy toward Israel and Palestine has announced its recommendations for fostering open and productive debate on those issues at General Convention this July.Five bishops and five members of the House of Deputies served on the Israel and Palestine Working Group, which was formed last year by Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, House of Deputies president. Curry and Jennings have accepted the working group’s three core recommendations, according to an email to members of the two houses sent May 31 by the Rev. Michael Barlowe, General Convention’s executive officer.“Members of the working group were not asked to guide General Convention in any particular way on the underlying issues, about which members have various points of view,” Barlowe said. Instead, the 10 members issued the following recommendations to enable “a prayerful, thoughtful and respectful engagement that facilitates genuine discernment”:All members of the House of Bishops and House of Deputies are encouraged to review a resource list assembled by the working group. The list includes suggested reading on issues related to Israeli-Palestinian relations and background about the Episcopal Church’s past engagement on those issues.Each house agrees to take up these issues through a “special order of business,” which will allow hearings and discussions to take place early in General Convention and ensure debate isn’t sidelined by procedural barriers. (See page 204 here for more on the special order of business.)The House of Deputies will be the house of initial action for each resolution pertaining to Israel and Palestine.“I am so grateful to the task force for their work,” Curry said in an emailed statement. “Their work will make it possible for the convention to have a thoughtful, prayerful discussion and consideration of the humanitarian concerns in Israel Palestine. In so doing may we pray and work for the peace of Jerusalem.”Jennings alluded to the challenges ahead in a written statement.“We’ve got some hard conversations about the Holy Land ahead of us at General Convention,” she said. “I’m grateful to the deputies and bishops of the Israel and Palestine Working Group for recommending a structure that will help us have those conversations in ways that are respectful, substantive and representative of the wide range of Episcopalians’ experiences and opinions.”Beginning the debate in the House of Deputies, which is a larger and more diverse body, will help ensure a broader debate, said the Rev. Brian Grieves, a member of the House of Deputies who served on the Israel and Palestine Working Group. Both houses have an interest in moving this debate forward.Underlying the working group’s deliberations was the imperative to “have a discussion that is open and respectful and transparent in the process,” Grieves told Episcopal News Service. “Because there have been concerns in the past that it has not been. Things got bottled up in committees.”General Convention has voted in support of Middle East peace for decades; however, the question of whether to apply more forceful economic pressure on Israel for its occupation of the Palestinian Territories has been a hot-button issue in recent years. In 2012, the bishops joined deputies in approving a resolution in favor of “positive investment” in the region as part of a show of support for peace among Jews, Muslims and Christians in the Holy Land, but the two houses were unable to agree on a second resolution calling for greater engagement in corporate social responsibility through the church’s investment portfolio.At General Convention in 2015, a resolution calling on the church to divest from companies engaged in certain business with Israel failed in a vote of the House of Bishops, which meant it never made it to the House of Deputies for consideration.Grieves, who is a member of the Stewardship and Socially Responsible Investing legislative committee in the House of Deputies, said the church already participates in corporate engagement related to Israel and Palestine based on a 2005 report by what was then known as the Executive Council’s Social Responsibility in Investments committee. That report was endorsed by Executive Council, and the results can be seen this year in church-backed shareholder resolutions seeking to influence Motorola and Caterpillar, two companies that have contracts with the Israeli government.“I think corporate engagement has been very good, but I do think here may be a point where we as a church would end our complicity in continuing to work with these companies,” Grieves said. “I don’t know when that point should be reached. I think we need to do some careful thinking about that, and that’s part of the discussion that’s going to happen at convention.”Numerous General Convention resolutions are expected on topics related to Israel and Palestine by the time the gathering gets underway on July 5 in Austin, Texas. At least three have been submitted so far, including one proposed by the Diocese of California that reintroduces a push for divestment from “those companies that profit from Israel’s occupation of Palestinian lands or whose products or actions support the infrastructure of the occupation.”Corporate engagement won’t be the only topic related to the Holy Land. Two additional proposed resolutions call for greater attention to the plight of Palestinian children, including those being tried in Israeli military courts.The Israeli-Palestinian conflict should eventually generate a greater diversity of resolutions at this General Convention, said Sarah Lawton, who chairs the Social Justice and International Policy committee for the House of Deputies. That variety is related to the number of big developments in the region in recent years, from the breakdown of the peace process to global outrage at the Trump administration moving the U.S. embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.In the past, General Convention has sometimes debated single larger resolutions addressing multiple aspects of the conflict together, making it difficult to move forward on individual measures, but Lawton said this time should be different. “It’s not just one big resolution going forward but a number of them,” said Lawton, who also was a member of the Israel and Palestine Working Group.Bishop Barry Beisner, another member of the working group, has submitted a resolution seeking to reaffirm the church’s stance in support of Jerusalem as an open city, where Christians, Muslims and Jews have free access to the city’s holy sites. He doesn’t expect that resolution to generate much controversy, but “there’s a broad spectrum of opinion on any number of related issues.”Beisner emphasized the value in the list of resources assembled by the working group, to help General Convention prepare for those discussions. And the bishops aren’t giving up their voice by agreeing to start deliberations in the House of Deputies, he said.“It will help to expedite the consideration of these resolutions to have them all under that one tent initially,” said Beisner, who serves on the Social Justice and International Policy committee.With so many issues at stake, Lawton thinks people on all sides of these debates have an interest in avoiding the procedural pratfalls that can lead to inaction.“We’ve had a hard time with this conversation [about Israel and Palestine]. One of the ways that it was hard was played out in the process,” she said. “These are important issues, and we should be able to speak to them and not feel afraid to say something.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] June 7, 2018 at 11:20 pm Israel is a legitimate state and it is not going to go away despite the wishes of a select group of people. Israel needs security, Palestinians need to live in dignity. Palestinians include Christians and supporting their just cause is not being anti-Semite or anti-Israel.The ongoing conflict between Palestine and Israel very much impacts the lives of the people in the Middle East and indirectly/directly those outside Middle East. Not surprisingly many organizations including the Episcopal Church wish and are working towards a peaceful resolution. As I understand the BDS movement played a role in changing the apartheid policies of South African govt. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET mike geibel says: Kristie Raynor says: June 8, 2018 at 11:48 pm C’mon Donna Hicks, have the guts to say that you were addressing me, Larry Waters. We were on a tour and were made aware of things that were acceptable and not acceptable. And yes we listened and adhered to all the cautions. Furthermore, this was not just a random woman that I had my arm around, it was my wife. And no I was not hugging her either. Perhaps if someone shoves a rifle in your face, you have may a little more empathy for the victim [you]. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Comments (22) Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group June 5, 2018 at 7:45 pm I’m not sure what the question is in all of this. If a bunch of people bought most of the houses in South Dakota away from absentee landlords and then, as new owners, evicted legitimate squatters (rightful owners), and declared it a new state apart from America, it would be obvious. You can’t just buy a nation out from under the feet of its citizens. I don’t think it should matter how many parcels Zionists bought, who won what battle, or the tactics the Palestinians who fought against them used before they lost. It shouldn’t even matter how the Palestinians have fought since. Israel is an illegitimate state. Israel is an illegitimate state.Nothing Palestine has done or will do will change that. You don’t need to look at the morality of desperate Palestinians to gauge this. Israel is a well funded ethnostate machine that will not stop building settlements where they know they should not be. Israel keeps people poor, trapped, and without means. Jews, Muslims, and Christians all lived in Palestine until the religiously intolerant state of Israel took that away. Israel, the state, must fall so, actual Israel, can be the people of God again.I’d say the view for Episcopalians should be clear, but really, it shouldn’t be just us that this is blatantly clear to. What people need a glass of water and which people want help cutting off an ear? Who are we called to serve? Earl B Curtis says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS General Convention, John Michael Povey says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing June 6, 2018 at 8:45 am It’s important to be aware of cultural norms when we’re visiting other cultures and countries. When I worked in Hebron doing human rights monitoring, hazardous accompaniment and violence reduction work, as an international and a woman, I dressed modestly but not so I was dressed as an Israeli Jewish settler woman or as a Palestinian Muslim woman – trousers (not tight-fitting), and a shirt which reached past my hips and sleeves which covered my elbows. Also we didn’t hug men in public. Anthony Vaccaro says: June 8, 2018 at 8:45 am Dear Ms. Raynor: The tenor and venom of your response displays your hatred for the Jews of Israel. No condemnation of the murders and atrocities committed by Hamas and others is found in the TEC denunciations of Israel. No denunciation of the efforts by Arab States to murder millions of Israelis ever escapes the lips of BDS supporters. Under Sharia Law, unmarried fornicators are to be whipped, adulterers are to be stoned to death, and homosexuals must be executed. Quran (2:191-193) – “And kill them wherever you find them, and turn them out from where they have turned you out.”Quran (9:30) – “And the Jews say: Ezra is the son of Allah; and the Christians say: The Messiah is the son of Allah; these are the words of their mouths; they imitate the saying of those who disbelieved before; may Allah destroy them; how they are turned away!” I choose to divest from the Episcopal Church. mike geibel says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab June 5, 2018 at 10:17 pm Something outside of the box like a two state one nation solution is going to be requred if a fix is ever devised for this.Each state with complete autonomy in its own affairs and a federal organ to handle external affairsl.Tricky for sure.In fact Revelations hints that only the return of Christ will solve this centuries old dilemma Larry Waters says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA Jen Finesilver says: Middle East John Hobart says: Rector Martinsville, VA June 7, 2018 at 12:38 pm That is absolutely false. Every time Episcopalians or Presbyterians speak out against the barbarism of the Israeli government, we are accused of being antisemitic. It is nothing but propaganda to hide the multitude of sins being committed by corrupt israeli officials and military. We should divest from companies which support these massive human rights violations, and make it clear that those actions are not to be tolerated. June 6, 2018 at 12:02 am Some years ago, my wife and I were in Jerusalem near the Dome of the Rock mosque. As it was cold, I had my arm around my wife. Suddenly, four armed men stormed down a sidewalk, from the mosque, toward us, shouting, waving their weapons. After some tense moments, one of the men with a rifle, said in broken English that we must be Americans and Christian and that we were being disrespectful to Islam. The men did not like my arm around my wife. And people wonder why peace is so elusive. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Joe Prasad says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC Submit an Event Listing Joe Prasad says: Rector Belleville, IL Rector Collierville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Vicki Gray says: June 5, 2018 at 8:41 pm At last! At long last…an opportunity to look clearly at the injustice and suffering confronting us, to talk honestly about it, and act courageously to end it.. When the suffering ends, security will follow. When justice begins, peace will follow.God bless all who participated in these deliberations. I look forward to joining the conversation in Austin. Israel-Palestine, June 9, 2018 at 8:19 am Larry, I was making a general comment, not addressing you – a reasonable thing to factor in when traveling of which all of us may not be aware. It’s good you were made aware of what and wasn’t acceptable. I have had rifles in my face and I have been caught in crossfire and teargassed and had percussion grenades tossed towards me. It’s not comfortable and it’s scary. Youth Minister Lorton, VA By David PaulsenPosted Jun 5, 2018 June 5, 2018 at 7:05 pm new paths must be found. what’s been done in the many past & lost decades has led to nothing good. Israelis are still not fully secure, & Palestinians still suffer, … greatly. balanced discussions & policies have rarely happened. one factor missing is actual factual learning of how this tragedy began. i am sick of people who can only focus on the latest stone being thrown, or whatever. WHY was that stone thrown. how many decades led to that stone being thrown. the suffering must end, but righteous people must demand it. not enough righteous people, perhaps. tragic, & disgusting. June 6, 2018 at 8:14 pm The Episcopal Church is the proven enemy of Israel. The Anti-Semitic BDS movement (boycott, divest and sanction) is and always will be a failure because it it ignores the truth that Israelis cannot—nothing short of total annihilation of all Jews and the de-legitimization of the sovereign country of Israel will satisfy the Palestinians, Hamas and the BDS supporters. As reflected in some comments to this article and in previous ENS articles, the efforts of various anti-Israel hate groups have but one goal: to demonize, isolate, and ultimately destroy the Jewish state through political and economic warfare. “Open debates” will not deter or even temper those who insist on the destruction of Israel.Some dissenting members may react with calls to “boycott the boycotters.” Boycotts will change the agenda of anti-Israel clergy no more than punitive boycotts will compel Israelis to surrender to Hamas. But dissenting congregants will leave the Episcopal Church over this divisive debate, along with their pledge money and bequests. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ June 8, 2018 at 8:24 pm It is the BDS movement which is Anti-Israel and Anti-Semitic. The BDS supporters do not want a peaceful resolution—they seek to weaken and destroy Israel. In the past, the General Convention has supported recognition of the State of Israel and its right to be secure within its borders. (Acts of Convention, 1988-D0530) In the ensuring years a growing faction within the Church has become radical and strident on participating in an anti-Israel economic war under the false premise that this would promote peace talks. (Acts of Convention, 2012-B019; Divestment Resolution D060). Recent proclamations from the Church have denounced and blamed Israel, and Israel alone, for deaths resulting from violent protests in Gaza and the West Bank and have selectively eliminated facts and video clips showing the violent and reprehensible acts by Palestinians protestors. (Using children as human shields)A 2013 Executive Council Coordinating Committee report from the TEC stated “this Church does not support boycott, divestment, and economic sanctions against the state of Israel nor any application of the Church’s corporate-engagement policies toward such ends.” In 2015, the Church wisely chose to reject the demands of radical BDS advocates. When churches or nations are perceived to condemn only Israel, then it is fair to identify them as aligned with those whom they vocally and financially support. The following chronology of some of the acts of murder and terrorism by radical Palestinians are not to be found in the “resource list” referenced in the ENS article: • Kiryat Shmona massacre: April 11, 1974—Israel Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine –18 killed, 8 victims were children; 15 injured.• Ma’alot massacre: May 14, 1974–Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine–29 killed, 68 injured; mostly children.• Coastal Road massacre: March 11, 1978–near Tel Aviv Palestinian Liberation Organization–38 people were killed on bus, including 13 children. Other people were killed nearby. 71 wounded.• Dizengoff Street bus bombing: October 19 1994–Tel Aviv, Hamas Suicide bomber blows himself up in a bus during the morning rush hour–Killing 22 people and injuring 50 others.• Beit Lid massacre: January 22, 1995–Palestinian Islamic Jihad–23 killed, including 2 perpetrators; 69 were injured.• Island of Peace massacre: March 13, 1997–Jordanian Army Corporal Ahmed Daqamseh opened fire on a large group of Israeli schoolgirls–19 were killed.• Sbarro restaurant massacre: August 9, 2001—Jerusalem, Hamas killed 15 and 130 were injured; 7 victims were children.• Dolphinarium discotheque massacre : June 1, 2001–Tel Aviv, Hamas killed 21 and more than 100 are wounded.• Bat Mitzvah massacre: 18 January 2002—In Hadera, the Fatah al-Aqsa Martyrs’ Brigades kill 7 and wound 33.• Yeshivat Beit Yisrael massacre: March 2, 2002–Beit Yisrael, Jerusalem, the Fatah al-Aqsa Martyrs’ Brigades kill 11, including 7 children, 2 of which were infants• Passover massacre: March 27, 2001– In Netanya, Hamas kills 30 and 140 are injured; some victims were Holocaust survivors; considered the deadliest single attack against Israeli civilians during the Second Intifada.• Tel-Aviv central bus station massacre: January 5, 2003—In Southern Tel Aviv, the Fatah al-Aqsa Martyrs’ Brigade kills 23 and over 100 injured.• Mercaz HaRav massacre: March 6, 2008—In Kiryat Moshe, Jerusalem, Arab gunman, Alaa Abu Dhein kills 8 at a school; 7en victims were students.• 2014 Jerusalem synagogue massacre : November 8, 2014–InHar Nof, Jerusalem Uday Abu Jamal and Ghassan Abu Jamal attack against a synagogue. Four rabbis and a police officer were killed.• June 2016 Tel Aviv shooting: June 8, 2016—At a Sarona market, Tel Aviv, Khalid al-Mahmara and Muhammad Mahmara attack restaurant guests in downtown Tel Aviv, killing four innocent civilians. In the First Intifada, a total of 160 Israelis and 2,162 Palestinians were killed, including 1,000 Palestinians killed by other Palestinians under the accusation of being collaborators. In the Second Intifada (2000–2005), it is estimated that 1,137 Israelis were killed by Palestinians. More recently, 500 Israeli civilians were killed by Palestinians from September 29, 2000, to March 31, 2012, in Israel, and another 254 Israeli civilians were killed in the Gaza Strip and the West Bank.And let us also not forget that in 1967, Palestinian Arab Christian Sirhan Sirhan assassinated (murdered) presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy. Robert Kennedy’s crime? He had supported the sale of bombers to Israel.What are the Palestinian demands for Peace that BDS will help achieve?Yasser Arafat, in 1970 stated: “Our basic aim is to liberate the land from the Mediterranean Seas to the Jordan River. We are not concerned with what took place in June 1967 or in eliminating the consequences of the June war. The Palestinian revolution’s basic concern is the uprooting of the Zionist entity from our land and liberating it.”Current President Mahmoud Abbas and his chief negotiator Saeb Erekat continue to deny Israel’s right to exist and promote vicious hatred against Jews. The state-controlled Palestinian media routinely praises the murders committed by Palestinians. Abbas al-Sayed who perpetrated the Passover suicide attack at the Park Hotel in Netanya which killed 30 civilians was described by President Abbas as a “hero” and “symbol of the Palestinian Authority.” When Israel agreed to hand over the bodies of dead Palestinian suicide bombers (who murdered 23, including children) in a humanitarian gesture to help the peace process, the Palestinian Authority held a national rally to honor them. The Temple Mount is home to the Al-Aqsa Mosque, the third holiest site in Islam. Israelis took control of the Temple Mount as a result of the 1967 war and it remains within their sovereignty, but Israel respectfully agreed and enforce the rule that only Muslims are allowed to enter the Mosque. In September 2015, Palestinian leaders spread false rumors that the Israelis planned to change the status of the Mosque, and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas incited the “stabbing intifada,” by stating on Palestinian television: “We welcome every drop of blood spilled in Jerusalem” and, as to the Al-Aqsa Mosque, Jews “have no right to dirty it with their filthy feet.” Innocent Jews were stabbed in the streets of Jerusalem. Hamas leaders and Palestinian President Masoud Abbas are NOT heroes in the mold of Nelson Mandela or Mahatma Gandhi. Comparisons between the religious civil war in the Middle East with Apartheid in South Africa or the British presence in India are insulting to the legacy of these true heroes of peace and non-violent protest. It is not morally just, but morally accursed, to use economic sanctions to force Israel to negotiate with Palestinian leaders who support murder and who steadfastly demand the destruction of Israel. In 2014, the Presbyterian Church USA and the United Church of Christ passed resolutions to boycott and divest from companies they decided were “complicit” in the Jewish State’s alleged misdeeds against Palestinians. In 2016, internal reports from the PCUSA forecast it would lose more than 400,000 members in the next half-a-decade. In 2015 and 2016, ECUSA membership reports showed a loss of 36,000 and 35,000 members respectively. Since the 2016 Election, the TEC leadership has contributed to a continuing loss of members with their divisive and strident partisan agenda on national political issues. By adding anti-Israel resolutions, there should be no surprise that pews continue to empty. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Donna Hicks says: Rector Albany, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York June 6, 2018 at 12:57 pm Amen. June 7, 2018 at 7:30 am Thank you Mike for the courage to speak the truth. The Israeli / Palestinian conflict has been going on for over a half a century. I don’t know what the EC thinks its going to accomplish with this effort except further dividing Episcopalians as you mention. Its a total waste of time and money that would be better spent figuring out how to stop the violence in cites like Detroit, St. Louis, Baltimore and the rest. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT S.R.Price says: Submit a Press Release June 5, 2018 at 8:22 pm Given the diminishing size, limited resources and diversity of opinion in the Episcopal Church, it seems unlikely to me that anything we do will have any impact on the Israel-Palestine situation. Maybe there are better ways we could use our time. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Bath, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Advocacy Peace & Justice, June 6, 2018 at 1:56 pm Amen General Convention 2018, June 7, 2018 at 11:14 pm Israel is a legitimate country and is not going to go away despite the wishes of a select group of people. Israel needs security, Palestinians need to lead a life of dignity. Palestinians include Christians and supporting their just causes is not being anti-Semite or anti-Israel.The checkered relationship between Israel and Palestine is a cause for much discomfort in the Middle East and outside the Middle East. And so it is not surprising that many organizations including the Episcopal Church want to see a peaceful resolution to the ongoing conflict between Israel and Palestine. As I understand the BDS movement played a role in changing the apartheid policies of South African government. If BDS movement brings about some positive changes so be it. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH June 7, 2018 at 7:53 pm I will, with others, walk out of an Anti-Semitic Church that Boycotts, Divests, or Sanctions Israel. There are over 6 million Jews in Israel and just how many can we BDS and still maintain that we are holier than them? Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ General Convention to consider new approach to Israel-Palestine issues promoting open debate Larry Waters says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 June 12, 2018 at 12:16 am Larry – I used to hear about South East Asians in Middle Eastern countries being treated rudely for no rhyme or reason. I listened. Then I had my own unpleasant experience not once but three times within a week – immigration, taxi driver, and security staff at a tourist site! The receptionist at Holiday Inn sympathized and educated me a bit about the local culture. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK den mark wichar, Vancouver WA says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET June 13, 2018 at 9:40 am How is working towards peace and a justice that includes ALL inhabitants of Israel and Palestine anti-Semitic? Rather than a knee-jerk response, please educate yourself on the work, the issues and the desired outcomes. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Donna Hicks says: Tags The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group mike geibel says: Joe Prasad says: Comments are closed. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Donna Hicks says: Bill Louis says: D.H. Antenen says: Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

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Nombran al Rdo. E. Mark Stevenson Canónigo del Obispo Primado…

first_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Belleville, IL Nombran al Rdo. E. Mark Stevenson Canónigo del Obispo Primado para el Ministerio dentro de la Iglesia Episcopal Rector Knoxville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Bath, NC Posted Aug 1, 2018 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Martinsville, VA Submit an Event Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service Rdo. Canónigo E. Mark Stevenson[1 de agosto de 2018] El Obispo presidente y primado Michael Curry ha designado al Rdo. Canónigo E. Mark Stevenson como Canónigo del Obispo Primado para el Ministerio dentro de la Iglesia Episcopal y como tal miembro del personal del Obispo Primado.En este cargo, Stevenson apoyará el ministerio del Obispo Primado entre los episcopales como asistente pastoral y asesor de teología y estrategia. Entre sus responsabilidades se incluyen servir de enlace y representante ante los obispos de la Iglesia y supervisar los preparativos de las reuniones de la Cámara de los Obispos. Además, brindará apoyo a los obispos y las diócesis episcopales para que lleven a cabo su ministerio y misión y para preparar las visitas del Obispo Primado. Stevenson también colaborará y trabajará muy de cerca con el Director Ejecutivo de la Convención General, la Presidente de la Cámara de Diputados y otros canónigos y directores ejecutivos del personal del Obispo Primado. Amén de dirigir la labor de los departamentos de Formación, ministerios de Jóvenes y Jóvenes Adultos y de Transición.“Estoy realmente encantado de que el Rdo. Mark Stevenson haya aceptado nuestro llamado a servir como canónigo para el ministerio dentro de la Iglesia Episcopal, dijo Curry”. “El canónigo Mark tiene una larga y reconocida trayectoria como canónigo de obispos, como gestor y administrador competente y como colega inteligente y generoso con todos. Sobre todo, es un devoto seguidor de Jesús de Nazaret”.El Obispo Primado destaca que Stevenson fue escogido entre un grupo inicial de 35 candidatos. Un comité de selección, nombrado por el Obispo Primado, revisó todas las solicitudes, reduciendo la lista a cuatro candidatos que fueron recomendados para entrevistarse con Curry. Después de coincidir con el comité de búsqueda en los nombres de los cuatro finalistas, el Obispo Primado llevó a cabo las entrevistas y luego identificó a Stevenson como su elección para ser el Canónigo para el Ministerio dentro de la Iglesia Episcopal.“Es un verdadero honor haber sido llamado a este ministerio por el Obispo Primado”, dijo Stevenson. “Me entusiasma el futuro de la Iglesia Episcopal bajo su liderazgo y espero servir con un gran equipo mientras la rama episcopal del Movimiento de Jesús sigue enseñando y predicando el poder transformador del amor de Dios y el amor al prójimo”.Conozca al Rdo. canónigo E. Mark StevensonEn la actualidad, Stevenson es el Director del Ministerio Episcopal de Migración, el programa de reasentamiento de refugiados de la Iglesia Episcopal, un cargo que ha ocupado desde mayo de 2016. Como Director dirige un equipo especializado, encargado de llevar a la práctica un programa nacional de reasentamiento de refugiados y otros ministerios afines en sociedad con el gobierno de Estados Unidos, filiales locales de reasentamiento y una red de comunidades y organizaciones ecuménicas en todo el país [que se encuentra] en vías de desarrollo.Desde el año 2005, hasta que se integró al personal del Obispo Primado en 2013 como Misionero de la Iglesia Episcopal para [combatir] la Pobreza Nacional, Stevenson sirvió como Canónigo del Ordinario en la Diócesis de Luisiana donde sus responsabilidades incluían la supervisión del personal del Obispo, administración del presupuesto, coordinación del clero y el ministerio transicional de la congregación y varios tareas pastorales y administrativas en toda la diócesis. Cuando el huracán Katrina toco tierra, días antes de que Stevenson asumiera su cargo, el alcance de su ministerio se expandió dramáticamente para incluir trabajar estrechamente con el entonces obispo Charles Jenkins, así como con líderes y agrupaciones locales, regionales, nacionales e internacionales, a fin de poner en marcha los procedimientos de un efectivo ministerio de socorro. En asociación con el Fondo Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo, la diócesis estableció una Oficina de Respuesta a Desastres que, con el transcurso de los años, se convirtió en Servicios Comunitarios Episcopales de Luisiana, un ministerio centrado no sólo en prestar ayuda inmediata en desastres, sino también en transformar vidas mediante la creación de comunidades de cuidado y respeto hacia todos los seres humanosAntes de eso, Stevenson fue rector de la Iglesia de la Anunciación [Annunciation] en Nueva Orleáns (Diócesis Episcopal de Luisiana) y de la Iglesia del Buen Pastor [Good Sheperd] en Maitland, Florida (Diócesis Episcopal de Florida Central).Stevenson es miembro del Consejo de la Fundación La Iglesia Viviente (The Living Church Foundation) y también fue miembro de la junta directiva del Fondo Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo. Además, fue diputado en la Convención General de 2012 y [diputado] suplente en la Convención General de 2009.Stevenson comenzará a desempeñarse como Canónigo del Obispo Primado dentro de la Iglesia Episcopal el 1 de septiembre de 2018. Su oficina seguirá estando en el Centro Denominacional de la Iglesia Episcopal en Nueva York. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group last_img read more

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