NCAA Final Four Set after blowouts, surprises

first_img(AP)—After a season of uncertainty, there’s a clear favorite heading to the Final Four.The Louisville Cardinals.While the other No. 1s have fallen by the wayside, the top overall seed romped to the Georgia Dome with four dominant wins in the NCAA tournament. And, if the Cardinals need any extra motivation, they’ve got it.Sophomore guard Kevin Ware, who played his high school ball in the Atlanta suburbs, sustained a gruesome injury in Sunday’s regional final against Duke. Before he headed off to surgery, he courageously urged his teammates to finish the job.Now, they would like nothing more than to win it all for Ware.“We talked about it every timeout, ‘Get Kevin home,’” coach Rick Pitino said.Next stop, the A-T-L, where three rather unlikely teams will be looking to knock off the mighty Cardinals.First up, the surprising Shockers from Wichita State in the semifinals Saturday. The No. 9 seed has already pulled off two major upsets, but this would be the biggest stunner yet.If Louisville makes it through to next Monday night’s title game, the opponent would be either Michigan, sporting a new group of Fab Wolverines, or Syracuse, which comes at you with the stingiest zone defense in college basketball. The two No. 4 seeds will meet in the other semifinal game.All are underdogs to the Cardinals, who are winning by an average of nearly 22 points a game in the tournament.“I thought we had a chance there, and then boom,” said Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski, who watched Louisville pull away for an 85-63 victory in the Midwest Regional final. “That’s what they do to teams. They can boom you.”In the other game Sunday, Michigan captured the South Regional with a 79-59 rout of Florida, leading from the opening tip. A day earlier, Syracuse shut down Marquette 55-39 to win the East Regional, while Wichita State punched its Final Four ticket with a 70-66 upset of Ohio State out West.In the final year of the Big East before it splits into two new conferences, Louisville and Syracuse provided a fitting send-off to a league that quickly became a basketball powerhouse after it was founded in 1979.Before it goes, this version of the Big East has a shot at one more national title.With two teams, no less.The Cardinals—who, like Syracuse, are moving to the Atlantic Coast Conference—shook off the incredible shock of Ware’s injury with about 6 1/2 minutes to go before halftime and blew out the second-seeded Blue Devils. The sophomore snapped his lower right leg after coming down awkwardly while defending a 3-point shot. The injury occurred right in front of the Louisville bench, where the players gasped and turned away quickly at the sight of Ware’s dangling leg, which was broken in two places.Russ Smith collapsed onto the floor, along with several players, and was crying as doctors attended to Ware. While Ware was loaded onto a stretcher, the Cardinals gathered at midcourt until Pitino called them over, saying the injured player wanted to talk to them before he left.“All he kept saying—and remember, the bone is six inches out of his leg—all he’s yelling is, ‘Win the game! Win the game!’” Pitino said. “I’ve never seen that in my life. We’re all distraught and all he’s saying is, ‘Win the game.’ Kevin is a special young man.”This is a special team. Smith scored 23 points. Gorgui Dieng had 14 points, 11 rebounds and four blocks.The Cardinals (33-5) simply refused to lose, breaking open a game that was tied at 42. They dove on the floor for loose balls. They pounded the boards ferociously. They contested every shot and swarmed around the Blue Devils like they had an extra player on the court.In a sense, they did, as Pitino reminded them during every timeout.“This is a gritty bunch,” the coach said. “From the beginning of the year to now, they’ve not had a bad game. I’m really proud of these guys.”Wichita State was the most improbable team to advance. The Shockers lived up to their nickname in the West, knocking off top-seeded Gonzaga in the second round and No. 2 seed Ohio State in the regional final Saturday night.Wichita State (30-8) built a 20-point lead on the Buckeyes, then managed to hang on through a nerve-racking final five minutes to pull off the latest upset in a tournament filled with them.That other team from Kansas isn’t content yet.“It feels very good,” said Cleanthony Early, a junior forward who, like most of his teammates, was passed over by higher-profile programs, “but we understand the fact that we’ve got to stay hungry and humble, because we’ve got two more games left to really be excited about.”Old-timers might remember Louisville and Wichita State as former conference rivals. The Cardinals were a member of the Missouri Valley Conference in the 1960s and ’70s, which meant annual games against the Shockers.Louisville holds a 19-5 edge in the series, but the teams haven’t played since 1976.Michigan (30-7) is headed back to the Final Four for the first time since the Fab Five era of the early 1990s, when the Wolverines lost in back-to-back national title games. LOUISVILLE head coach Rick Pitino celebrates with Chane Behanan, left, and guard Russ Smith (2) after their 85-63 win over Duke in the Midwest Regional final in the NCAA college basketball tournament, in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)last_img read more

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Energized Dust Bunnies Make Planets?

first_img(Visited 226 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Get a charge out of this new theory: planets were built by statically-charged dust bunnies. Is that all it takes?In secular theory, going way back to Laplace’s nebular hypothesis and its offspring, planets came into being out of orbiting dust around stars. It sounds natural until you look at the details. Planetary scientists have long known about the “bouncing barrier” to planet growth. Previous experiments have shown that at about one millimeter size, dust grains stop accreting and bounce off each other – even at low collision speeds of a few millimeters per second. They’ll never get planets at that rate, until they overcome the bouncing barrier.Now, scientists at Rutgers University feel they have a solution: static electricity. “We may have overcome a fundamental obstacle in understanding how planets form,” says the lead author, Troy Shinbrot, an engineer (not an astronomer).The study, published in the journal Nature Physics, found that particles under microgravity – similar to conditions believed to be in interplanetary space – develop strong electrical charges spontaneously and stick together, forming large aggregates. Remarkably, although like charges repel, like-charged aggregates form nevertheless, apparently because the charges are so strong that they polarize one another and therefore act like magnets.If you’ve seen the small magnetic balls that stick into strings of beads, that’s the basic idea. Each magnetic ball develops a north and south pole. Similarly, charged dust grains appear to become polar, with positive charges on one side and negative charges on the other.Using a device called a Bremen drop tower, the engineers charged glass microspheres and watched how they behaved with an electron microscope. Clumps of spheres several centimeters in size formed spontaneously, but discharged and disintegrated when they struck the walls of the device. They repeated the experiment with basalt microspheres and found that they charged an order of magnitude more strongly than the glass spheres. Charged dust clumps appear to orbit each other until they collide; some break up, and some stick to each other. The photo in the press release shows long strings of glass beads that formed in the apparatus.The method required vibrating the particles first to get them charged up. Would that have happened in a dust disk? They believe that collisions would have charged some dust particles—but that also could cause them to erode. Other charging mechanisms, they speculate, could include short-term radionuclides in the dust, or cosmic rays. Interstellar radiation, however, they calculate would be two orders of magnitude weaker at charging the dust.Drawbacks and LimitationsTheir theory only applies to inner planets within 1 AU (astronomical unit, the earth-sun distance).They did not get any clumps to grow to the needed size of centimeters to decimeters. They extrapolated what they think might happen.Planetesimals require accretion up to kilometer size.Centimeter-sized clumps will only accrete further if a “streaming instability” occurs.Collision speeds above a few meters per second tend to destroy the clumps.The time particles remain charged must exceed the time of discharge.Charges can attract, but also repel.Colliding strings of polar dust particles could discharge each other and subject them to disintegrating forces.No planets were formed.In order to believe that this experimental setup has anything to do with planetary origins, they realize that they have to invest in futureware.Thus, it is apparently possible for collisional charging to transform bouncing millimetre-sized grains into growing centimetre-sized aggregates. Whether this occurs depends on the relative rates of material charging versus discharging, and particle collisions versus dispersal. It is evident that unravelling the details of relations between charging and aggregation in protoplanetary disks will require considerable additional study.A huge gap remains, therefore, between this experiment and a credible theory of planetary origins. Without sufficient gravitational force to draw the ‘building blocks of planets’ together, the Second Law of Thermodynamics, most certainly, will predominate.Earth is a shining jewel in the blackness of space, ideally suited for life. Photo: Earthrise from Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, December 2015An interesting admission in their paper reveals their worldview. “To account for the simple fact that asteroids and planets do exist, several possible mechanisms have been investigated for growth beyond the millimetre scale.” They put blinders on their eyes, just like the Darwinian biologists do. “It exists, therefore it evolved.” Non-materialist positions need not even be considered! If Earth were created by design, secular scientists, with their blind-men-and-the-elephant philosophy, would never be able to find that out, even if you handed them Genesis 1:1, “In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth.”Planetary Science: the myth that dust bunnies turn into real bunnies, given billions of years.It’s one thing to critique a secular theory, which we do at CEH, taking it at face value and evaluating its merits for empirical support and logical plausibility. But complete evaluation must include the worldview behind the theory. These scientists undoubtedly feel they are doing “science” which is opposite “faith.” But really, everybody has faith. Theists have faith in intelligent design. Materialists have faith in the Stuff Happens Law, where charged dust bunnies are “certainly possible” and might lead to real bunnies. They need to believe that everything from the universe, stars, planets, life, and minds all happened by accident. Which worldview requires more faith?So materialists chug along in their labs, using created brains and minds, standing on a planet perfectly designed for human life, thinking “stuff happens.” No eyes are so blind as the ones that will not see.Time to watch The Privileged Planet again.Previous articles on the “bouncing barrier” and other problems with planet accretion include:2018 June 28: Planet Origin Theories Contradict Physics2017 14 Sept: Miracles in Solar System Origin Theories2016 25 Oct: Solar System Theories Challenged2015 24 Aug: Planet Recipe Cooked Up2015 Aug 15: Planets Defy Bottom-Up Assembly2014 July 5: Start Over: The Evolution of Planets Is All Wrong2014 May 4: Every Planet Surprises Secular Astronomers, III: Formation Theories2007 Dec 5: Is Making Planets Child’s Play?2004 Feb 3: Accretion: The Missing Link in Planetary Evolutionlast_img read more

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Virgin Australia’s Velocity promises exclusive access to concerts and events

first_imgHow many frequent flyer points would you sacrifice for a backstage meeting with your favourite superstar?It’s a question Velocity Frequent Flyer executives appear to be pondering as they look at options for their latest partnership with TEG Live, the company behind Australian event ticket seller Ticketek.Country rock superstar Keith Urban yesterday became the first major act to be part of a push by Velocity to connect its 6 million plus members with the entertainment industry. Premium tickets to Urban’s concerts in December are among the first available and he also gave an intimate concert at the launch in which he explained and played tracks from his new album, RipCORD.Velocity Live aims to give the one in four Australians who now belong the program to access to VIP offerings such as premium seating, pre-sale ticket allocations and backstage packages with the added bonus of earning frequent flyer points.Velocity chief executive Karl Schuster also yesterday did not rule out allowing people to use their points to pay for concerts. “Watch this space,’’ he said.The Velocity move is part of a push by loyalty programs to expand their offerings to members and make themselves an increasing part of their everyday lives.Velocity already allows members using BP service stations to buy petrol using their points and operates a portal where frequent flyers can use what has essentially become another currency to buy merchandise. Other “out of the box’’ concepts include giving members parental leave so they can maintain their status, family points pooling and awarding points for pets who fly.While still smaller than its opposition, Velocity has grown strongly and Schuster says there is plenty of room for more growth. “Aussies are really unique in the world, they’re a bit like Canadians, in they really love their loyalty programs,’’ he said.  “So we want to enrich the proposition and give people more earn opportunities, give people more burn opportunities.’’Schuster acknowledged most people still want to redeem their points for flights, an area in which Velocity has won awards for seat availability and which it still sees as crucial.“So that is really an important part of our deal and having being part of the Virgin Australia family, that’s again foremost in our minds,’’ he said.  “So we are always thinking about those things for our members. It’s what they care about, it’s where the rubber hits the road.’’But Velocity is also seeing members using their points in other ways and Schuster believes the technology will facilitate this trend.“The ease and frictionless nature of how you can use digital to engage in the program is becoming more and more a reality and we want a big part of that,’’ he said.On the live performance and event partnership, Schuster said entertainment was deeply entrenched in the Virgin family’s DNA and was were the brand was born with founder Richard Branson’s record label.He said the move was about “putting the heart back into loyalty’’ and would be available to all members regardless of their Velocity status. Velocity was working with TEG on select events across Australia throughout the year, with plans to add sporting events.“The intention is that Velocity Live will become the place to go to get exclusive money-can’t-buy experiences and the hub will be continually updated with exciting new events, entertainment experiences and offers for our members,’’ he said.Urban said he loved the fact the program would offer access to people who would not otherwise get it.“For me the live experience isn’t just playing live,’’ he said. “We also do a thing backstage in a lot of our concerts right now which is sort of the show before the show — not just a basic meet-and -greet but really getting to spend time with people and do a mini concert backstage.’’last_img read more

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9 days agoLiverpool to listen to offers for Herbie Kane

first_imgLiverpool to listen to offers for Herbie Kaneby Paul Vegas9 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool will listen to offers for Herbie Kane in January.Although the 20-year-old is highly-rated at Anfield, the club feel as though he won’t be able to crack into Jurgen Klopp’s first team.Football Insider says Rangers, Swansea and Hull City are all interested in the central midfielder.Kane excelled on loan last season at Doncaster Rovers. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img

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Video: Taylor Swift Watched Her Brother Graduate From Notre Dame Today, She’s Pretty Excited

first_imgNotre Dame's mascot dancing with the band.SOUTH BEND, IN – SEPTEMBER 16: The Leprechaun from the Notre Dame Fighting Irish excites the crowd in front of the Notre Dame Marching band against of the Michigan Wolverines September 16, 2006 at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Indiana. Michigan won 47-21. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)Everett Golson, Jerian Grant and Pat Connaughton weren’t the only notable people to graduate from Notre Dame today. Taylor Swift’s brother, Austin, also graduated from the prestigious university. The pop star was in attendance at Notre Dame Stadium to watch the ceremony, too. She was pretty excited for her sibling.last_img

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KfW IPEXBank Finances Royal Arctic Lines Boxship Duo

first_imgzoomIllustration. Image Courtesy: Pixabay under CC0 Creative Commons license German lender KfW IPEX-Bank is providing EUR 30 million (USD 34 million) to finance two new feeder container vessels for Greenland’s Royal Arctic Line.The financing is backed by cover from the Spanish export credit insurer CESCE and includes funds from the Spanish CIRR (Commercial Interest Reference Rate).Scheduled for delivery in 2020, the new vessels were earlier ordered from Zamakona Shipyard in Spain. Featuring around 30% of components supplied from Germany, the units will replace older vessels in RAL’s fleet.The 67m-long-vessels will have one of the highest ice classes, on-board cranes and a dynamic positioning system (DP) as well as connections for refrigerated containers to transport deep-frozen fish for exporting.KfW IPEX-Bank’s most recent financing for Royal Arctic Line was for a 2,150 TEU container vessel that is envisaged to improve liner traffic between Denmark and Greenland from 2019, together with two other, identically constructed newbuilds of the Icelandic shipping company Eimskip.last_img read more

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Rep Lucido presents tribute to retired Shelby Township fire marshal

first_img State Rep. Peter J. Lucido will present an official State of Michigan Tribute to longtime Shelby Township Fire Marshal Edward Vojtush on Monday, April 20.“It’s a great honor to be able to recognize the many years of service Edward Vojtush has provided to the residents of Shelby Township,” said Rep. Lucido, a Republican from Shelby Township. “The work he has done to protect us during his 25 year career deserves all the thanks we can give.”Rep. Lucido will present the Tribute at 11 a.m. at the Shelby Township Police Department, located at 6345 23 Mile Road in Shelby Township.Rep. Lucido represents the 36th House District, serving the townships of Shelby, Washington, Bruce and the Village of Romeo.### Categories: Lucido News 31Mar Rep. Lucido presents tribute to retired Shelby Township fire marshallast_img read more

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