The Chilean Military Promotes Diversity by Recruiting Indigenous People

first_imgBy Dialogo January 15, 2015 The Chilean Military is recruiting indigenous men and women to join its ranks, part of an effort to represent the country’s diversity in the Armed Forces. “This initiative is the result of a cultural change towards respecting and integrating the various peoples into the national reality,” said National Defense Minister Jorge Burgos during his opening speech at the “Seminar on Indigenous Peoples and Defense” at the Joint Center for Peace Operations of Chile (CECOPAC). The seminar was held on December 3 at the General René Schneider Military Base, in La Reina. The first commitment was the creation of an indigenous law, Law 19,253, and indigenous institutions; the ratification of Convention 169 of the International Labor Organization (ILO) came in 2008; and the third commitment was the constitutional recognition that there is a standing debt with the original peoples of Chile. In recent years, this effort “has been gaining strength,” said Miguel Navarro, a researcher with the National Academy of Political and Strategic Studies (ANEPE) in Chile. “Until we value cultural diversity and recognize ourselves as a multicultural society, Chile can never legitimately aspire to development,” Burgos added. The government “will foster and promote the rights of indigenous peoples and will adapt its internal mechanisms to effectively implement the international treaties that Chile has ratified on this issue, as well as ensuring that indigenous peoples have access to their natural resources.” Addressing a historic debt “This initiative is the result of a cultural change towards respecting and integrating the various peoples into the national reality,” said National Defense Minister Jorge Burgos during his opening speech at the “Seminar on Indigenous Peoples and Defense” at the Joint Center for Peace Operations of Chile (CECOPAC). The seminar was held on December 3 at the General René Schneider Military Base, in La Reina. “The Ministry of Defense has wanted to be a pioneer in this field and therefore established a team focused on inclusion to generate internal policies that effectively advance not just the indigenous issue, but also issues related to gender, disabilities and sexual diversity,” Burgos said during the December 3 seminar. “Until we value cultural diversity and recognize ourselves as a multicultural society, Chile can never legitimately aspire to development,” Burgos added. The government “will foster and promote the rights of indigenous peoples and will adapt its internal mechanisms to effectively implement the international treaties that Chile has ratified on this issue, as well as ensuring that indigenous peoples have access to their natural resources.” Historically, Military institutions, particularly the Army, have been viewed by many Chileans as a mechanism for social mobility, which has attracted indigenous people to the Armed Forces. In 1989, presidential candidate Patricio Aylwin joined with representatives of indigenous peoples from throughout Chile in a “New Imperial Agreement” in which three commitments were established, according to the Ministry of Defense. The Armed Forces has been recruiting more minorities and women into its ranks for at least 25 years. “The Ministry of Defense has wanted to be a pioneer in this field and therefore established a team focused on inclusion to generate internal policies that effectively advance not just the indigenous issue, but also issues related to gender, disabilities and sexual diversity,” Burgos said during the December 3 seminar. Officials from the Chilean Army, Navy, and Air Force attended the conference. They were joined by leaders from indigenous groups, academicians, and representatives from the Armed Forces of Canada and New Zealand, who spoke about their respective experiences with recruiting efforts to increase diversity. The Mapuche people are well represented in the Military Historically, Military institutions, particularly the Army, have been viewed by many Chileans as a mechanism for social mobility, which has attracted indigenous people to the Armed Forces. The campaign to increase diversity within Chile’s Armed Forces will address the country’s “historic debt” with indigenous people, according to a December 2 press release from the Ministry of Defense. Chilean Military officials are seeking to add indigenous recruits to the ranks of the countrys 64,000 members of the Armed Forces. The size of the Armed Forces has declined from nearly 81,000 Troops in 2004. While it has declined in size, the Chilean Armed Forces has greatly improved its technological capabilities in recent years, according to Navarro. “There has always been a significant proportion of Mapuche in the Armed Forces,” explained Navarro. “The Mapuche are considered to be very good soldiers and have not had any limitations in making it to the highest ranks within military institutions.” In 1989, presidential candidate Patricio Aylwin joined with representatives of indigenous peoples from throughout Chile in a “New Imperial Agreement” in which three commitments were established, according to the Ministry of Defense. “There has always been a significant proportion of Mapuche in the Armed Forces,” explained Navarro. “The Mapuche are considered to be very good soldiers and have not had any limitations in making it to the highest ranks within military institutions.” The campaign is being promoted by high-ranking officials, including Undersecretary of the Armed Forces Gabriel Gaspar. Currently, indigenous people account for about three percent of all recruits, the Diario Uchile newspaper reported on December 16. In recent years, this effort “has been gaining strength,” said Miguel Navarro, a researcher with the National Academy of Political and Strategic Studies (ANEPE) in Chile. The country’s largest indigenous group, the Mapuche people, is well represented in the Military. The Mapuche people, who are also known as “Arucanos,” live in south-central Chile and have a strong sense of cultural identity. The campaign is being promoted by high-ranking officials, including Undersecretary of the Armed Forces Gabriel Gaspar. Currently, indigenous people account for about three percent of all recruits, the Diario Uchile newspaper reported on December 16. The first commitment was the creation of an indigenous law, Law 19,253, and indigenous institutions; the ratification of Convention 169 of the International Labor Organization (ILO) came in 2008; and the third commitment was the constitutional recognition that there is a standing debt with the original peoples of Chile. MThe Armed Forces of Chile, which had 80,900 troops in 2004, declined to a force of 64,200 eight years later, according to the Military Statistics for South America, 2013 published by the website Nueva Mayoría. Officials from the Chilean Army, Navy, and Air Force attended the conference. They were joined by leaders from indigenous groups, academicians, and representatives from the Armed Forces of Canada and New Zealand, who spoke about their respective experiences with recruiting efforts to increase diversity. Chile’s indigenous population is at 1.71 million (out of 16 million total), according to figures from the 2012 Census; of those, 84 percent identify themselves as Mapuches, with the rest divided among 10 other ethnic groups. Most of the country’s indigenous people live in metropolitan regions. The country’s largest indigenous group, the Mapuche people, is well represented in the Military. The Mapuche people, who are also known as “Arucanos,” live in south-central Chile and have a strong sense of cultural identity. The campaign to increase diversity within Chile’s Armed Forces will address the country’s “historic debt” with indigenous people, according to a December 2 press release from the Ministry of Defense. The Chilean Military is recruiting indigenous men and women to join its ranks, part of an effort to represent the country’s diversity in the Armed Forces. The Mapuche people are well represented in the Military Chile’s indigenous population is at 1.71 million (out of 16 million total), according to figures from the 2012 Census; of those, 84 percent identify themselves as Mapuches, with the rest divided among 10 other ethnic groups. Most of the country’s indigenous people live in metropolitan regions. The Armed Forces has been recruiting more minorities and women into its ranks for at least 25 years. Chilean Military officials are seeking to add indigenous recruits to the ranks of the countrys 64,000 members of the Armed Forces. The size of the Armed Forces has declined from nearly 81,000 Troops in 2004. While it has declined in size, the Chilean Armed Forces has greatly improved its technological capabilities in recent years, according to Navarro. Addressing a historic debt MThe Armed Forces of Chile, which had 80,900 troops in 2004, declined to a force of 64,200 eight years later, according to the Military Statistics for South America, 2013 published by the website Nueva Mayoría.last_img read more

Read More »

THE COPE BUILDERS PROVIDERS DUNGLOE STILL GOING STRONG AFTER 110 YEARS!

first_imgThe Cope Builders Providers Dungloe have announced an increase in sales, and have said the future looks much more positive after a number of difficult years in business.The economic downturn effected all industry’s across the Country, but the construction sector realty felt the pinch and multiple jobs and business were lost during the recession.The Cope Builders Providers faced many difficult challenges during that period and worked tirelessly to ensure it continue and improve the service it provides. Management at The Cope Builders Providers Dungloe have been over-whelmed with the interest in their new range of Solid Fuel Heating systems.The Cope are the main distributor for Metal Fach solid fuel heating systems, which are manufactured in Poland.Laurence McDaid, Manager of the Builders and Providers said, “The main differential of the Metal Fach heating systems is the build quality and product reliability.“Once installed we have seen customers save up to 50% on fuel bills and now with the exchange rates being what they are, we have seen a significant increase in enquiries from customers in Northern Ireland. Laurence also pointed out that the Cope Builders Providers has experienced a consistent increase in sales over the last number of monthsHe added, “One area of the home that people are improving is their home-heating systems.“There are so many products available to lower annual heating bills, that it makes sense to spend now and save on your bills later.”Mark Sharkey, Chief Executive of the Cope, says all businesses in the Cope are showing signs of growth.“The last number of years in business have been demanding without doubt. At the Cope all of our team have worked tirelessly to improve and grow our Co-operative in difficult times. “We have added three new business units during the recession including, An Club Beag a 8,000 sq. foot Children’s Play Area, hubtec our Computer Sales & Services Shop and Cope Cycles.“At the Cope we always remain committed to the community who support us – since 2010 The Cope has fund-raised and sponsored over €147,000 to local clubs and organisations.“We are seeing a strong improvement in Sales so as we look forward to our 110th year, I have every faith that The Cope will be around for another 110 years!THE COPE BUILDERS PROVIDERS DUNGLOE STILL GOING STRONG AFTER 110 YEARS! was last modified: March 11th, 2015 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:BusinessdungloeFeaturesnewsTHE COPElast_img read more

Read More »

Smuggling of cattle along Bangladesh border drops by half

first_imgCattle smuggling along the 4,096-km India-Bangladesh border has dropped almost by half since 2016. Detailed figures reveal that in 2016 about 1,28,440 cattle heads were seized, while the figure dropped to 83,378 in 2017 and 51,592 cattle heads in 2018.The number of cattle seized along the border is an indication of the volume of illegal cattle trade running into thousands of crores of rupees. Till June 30 this year, about 23,208 cattle heads were seized along the border by the BSF. The details of the seizures were tabled in Parliament in response to a question by BJP MP from West Bengal Arjun Singh. The South Bengal Frontier of the BSF, which guards 915 km of the border from Sunderbans to Malda, continues to account for 60% to 70% cattle heads seized. As many as 16,131 cattle heads were seized from the frontier this year. The frontier, spanning five districts of Bengal, accounted for 74% of the cattle heads seized in 2018, while in 2017, it accounted for 60% of the cattle heads seized.West Bengal, however, is not a source State for smuggling of cattle. According to BSF officials, cattle from different States, particularly in north India, and brought to the State before being smuggled through the porous south Bengal border. The crackdown on cattle trade in the country is believed to have affected this illegal trade.last_img read more

Read More »

$2.5 Billion Allocated to Major Infrastructure Programme

first_imgWork under the Jamaica Emergency Employment Programme (JEEP) forms part of activities to commence this month through the Major Infrastructure Development Programme (MIDP), for which some $2.5 billion has been budgeted. As detailed in the 2013/14 Estimates of Expenditure, currently being reviewed by Parliament’s Standing Finance Committee, the MIDP aims to continue road improvement works and attendant activities islandwide. Envisaged targets include: rehabilitation of approximately 430 kilometres of roads, deemed in need of urgent attention to facilitate seamless vehicular movement; rehabilitation or construction of 27 bridges and retaining walls, and executing supporting protective works identified by the National Works Agency (NWA); completion of sub-projects started under the Jamaica Development Infrastructure Programme (JDIP); and the provision of employment under JEEP. Several groundwork activities have been carried out, ahead of this month’s scheduled start of the MIDP. These include: Cabinet’s approval for the firm, China Harbour Engineering Company (CHEC) engagement as the contractor; conclusion and signing of project agreement between the Government and CHEC; and completion of an engineering feasibility study. Activities scheduled for this year include: commencement work to effect repairs to community roads, retaining walls and drainage structures under JEEP; awarding of contracts to rehabilitate six roads, including Windsor to Seaman’s Valley to Moore Town, Portland; Chovey to Claremont, St. Mary; Riley to Glasgow, and Silver Spring to Green Island, Hanover; Mandeville to Spur Tree via Swaby’s Hope, Manchester; and May Pen to Hayes, Clarendon.In addition, contracts are slated to be awarded for the reconstruction of bridges at Vanity Fair, St. Mary; Latium, St. James; Jacob River, Portland; and Silent Hill, Clarendon.The Ministry of Transport, Works and Housing is spearheading implementation of the activities.The four-year project, being jointly funded by the Government and China EXIM Bank, is scheduled for completion in March 2016.By Douglas McIntosh, JIS Reporterlast_img read more

Read More »

Some girls in Nunavut using socks instead of tampons because of high

first_imgVicki Briscall is shipping these feminine hygiene supplies to Iqaluit.Kathleen MartensAPTN NewsWhen Patty Krawec heard girls might be skipping school in Nunavut because of the high price of feminine hygiene products she put out a call for cash on social media.The generous responses helped her load four hockey bags full of tampons, pads and related supplies to take along to the capital city of Iqaluit.“I’m up about $1,500 now in two days,” she said on the phone while enroute to Ottawa airport.“I’ve got 24 boxes of Playtex tampons, several boxes of Always (feminine pads), and some bladder-control products for elders.”Krawec, who was flying north to visit her son, says donations came from strangers shocked to learn a box of tampons can cost $15 or more, maxi-pads $18 and ultra-thins $25.“For some reason I had never connected food insecurity with sanitary product insecurity,” Krawec said of the sky-high prices Nunavummiut pay for shipped-in groceries.“That to me just sounded so horrible. That these girls in Canada are missing school because these products are too expensive.”Iqaluit Mayor Madeleine Redfern, who has tweeted about this big expense women face, says families in the north often forego basic needs because of the cost.But she doesn’t think girls in Iqaluit are missing school because of it.“Romeyn Stevenson, deputy mayor, is also the vice principal of the high school,” she said Monday. “He says they have such supplies available upon request.”But Susan Fahidy thinks some girls are too embarrassed to ask for help.“I’ve heard they’re going without or that they use socks,” said the director of Friends of the North, an Ontario group that sends donations to food banks on Baffin Island.Price of menstrual pads in Iqaluit Northmart store. Fahidy is glad to see a conversation about the “exorbitant cost” particularly in poverty-stricken communities.“It’s a matter of do we eat or do we buy feminine hygiene supplies,” she said.Redfern said the women’s shelter in Iqaluit is always in need of feminine hygiene products.“There’s no free spending money and the shelter doesn’t get funding for such items,” she added.Jeannie Bishop, director of YWCA Agvvik in Iqaluit, said for now their shelves are stocked but they do welcome donations.Feminine hygiene products were subject to GST until 2015 but even without the tax, the cost is still a burden for many.Bishop said they make sure women fleeing domestic violence don’t have to worry about buying monthly supplies.However, she wouldn’t be surprised if girls miss classes due to their families’ inability to afford menstrual products. Especially in outlying communities.She said no one she knows is co-ordinating such a service.“I wouldn’t question for a second there are young girls who cannot go to school because their parents are not buying pads or Tampax,” she said.Tampons for sale in the Iqaluit Northmart store.“They get something like $359 a month (in social assistance)…There are crowded houses here. Average is 12 people per house in two-bedroom homes.”Redfern noted the products are not included in the federal government’s Nutrition North food subsidy program.Fahidy said her group responds to demand by holding about three drives for donations of feminine hygiene products annually.“For these women to have to come forward requesting something like that can be quite embarrassing. And maybe a little bit intimidating,” she said.“But I am hearing of it, that it’s being kind of whispered: ‘Can you get? Do you have any? Can you help?’”She said a woman might be able to ask for assistance but she’s not sure how a teenager would handle the situation.“It’s hard enough to deal with when you’re 14, let alone having to ask for help outside of your mother or grandmother,” Fahidy said.Krawec, an Anishinaabe woman from Niagara Falls, Ont., posted photos of the bulging hockey bags on Facebook. Bags, she said, her church normally uses to ship school supplies and clothing to Nicaragua.“I got a donation of $250 from someone I don’t even know. He messaged me on Twitter and said ‘I want to help.’ I’m like, dude, thank you very much.”Krawec said her mom, Vicki Briscall, “kind of went wild” by using gift cards and rewards points to top up the shopping spree.“It’s really exciting and sad,” she said of what she’s learning about northern expenses.“Food insecurity in the north is the result of legislative policy decisions. It’s a systemic issue. This is a nice thing I can do. And I’m going there anyway.”Krawec, who hosts a podcast about issues facing people of colour called Medicine for the Resistance, was planning to distribute her donations this week to the shelter, elementary school and high school.She said she had been in touch with the mayor and was dismayed to learn government did not subsidize the prices.“We shouldn’t have to fundraise for this in Canada,” Krawec said. “When we’ve got all this money for a pipeline.”[email protected]@katmartelast_img read more

Read More »

Institutional investors key to driving increase in women on boards report

first_imgTORONTO – The support of institutional investors is key to driving any meaningful increase in female representation on corporate boards and in the executive suites, a new analysis suggests.The review authored by lawyers at Bay St. law firm Torys LLP says increased scrutiny on board composition has become a growing area of focus for big investors.“While they have traditionally engaged with boards behind closed doors to advocate for governance or other strategic initiatives, institutional investors are becoming more openly vocal about the value of a diverse board that includes women,” the analysis said of the situation in Canada.It pointed to the Canadian Coalition for Good Governance’s gender diversity policy and the Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan, which expressly encourages gender diversity on boards.The report noted that the number of women have increased in recent years, but women in director seats continue to account for a significant minority.A report earlier this month by the Canadian Securities Administrators found the percentage of board seats filled by women has edged higher in recent years.The report found the total percentage of board seats occupied by women increased to 14 per cent compared with 12 per cent last year and 11 per cent in 2015 when the report was first published.The Ontario Securities Commission is set to hold a roundtable on women on boards and in executive positions on Oct. 24.last_img read more

Read More »

Yemen peace hangs on fragile truce as conflict far from over

first_imgDubai: Four years after Saudi Arabia led a military intervention in Yemen to back the government against rebels, the only hope for peace in a country threatened by famine hangs on a fragile truce. Despite the Saudis entering the conflict on March 26, 2015 with a coalition composed of nine countries from the Middle East and Africa, Yemen’s internationally-recognised government has failed to defeat the Huthi. The Iran-aligned rebels continue to control much of northern Yemen, including the capital Sanaa. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from USAnd the conflict — which the United Nations says has unleashed the world’s worst humanitarian crisis and pushed the country to the brink of famine — shows no sign of abating in the impoverished nation. In December, the rival sides agreed to a ceasefire in the key lifeline Red Sea port of Hodeida — just weeks after forces loyal to the government were able to enter the rebel-held city. But even if major fighting has stopped, other elements of the accord — including a prisoner swap — have failed to materialise. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential polls”There was a real breakthrough in Sweden. Substantive, on the one hand, but even more so in the psychological sense,” Elizabeth Dickinson, senior analyst with the International Crisis Group think tank, said. “There have been delays, obstacles, and backtracking, but what is unchanged is that the parties still view the agreement as their best option.” Yemenis were hopeful the hard-won agreement reached in Sweden would be followed by a long-lasting peace deal, particularly as Riyadh came under intense international scrutiny following the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi inside the kingdom’s Istanbul consulate. Fighting in Hodeida, whose port serves as the country’s lifeline, has largely stopped since the ceasefire went into effect on December 18, but there have been intermittent clashes. And both the government and the Huthis have been accused of violating the truce deal, while an agreed redeployment of forces has also not yet been implemented. The Saudi-led coalition, which has won US logistical support and includes the United Arab Emirates, warned in late January it was still prepared to use “force” against the Huthis to make the rebels abide by the UN-backed truce deal. According to security analyst Aleksandar Mitreski the warring sides in Yemen are “showing no major weaknesses”. He insisted that, however, that an “alleviation of the humanitarian crisis is possible”. “Current mounting pressure on the Saudi-led coalition may open up more channels for humanitarian aid to flow. This pressure can grow if the spotlight shifts from Syria over to Yemen.” International outcry over Khashoggi’s murder and images of emaciated Yemeni children has strained Saudi Arabia’s relations with its western allies, including Washington. In March, the US Senate voted to end Washington’s military support for Riyadh-led efforts in the Yemen war. Yemen’s conflict has left around 24 million people — more than three quarters of the country’s population — now dependent on some form of aid for survival. The Yemeni government has been battling the Iran-aligned Huthi rebels since 2014, before the intervention the following year by the Saudis. An estimated 10,000 people have been killed since March 2015, when Saudi Arabia and its allies — with the logistical and political backing of the United States — unleashed air power against the Huthi rebels. But rights groups say the death toll is likely far higher. Save the Children has estimated that 85,000 Yemenis under five years old may have died of starvation. Michelle Bachelet, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, warned that children in Yemen continued to be killed and maimed at an alarming rate, despite the three-month-old truce in Hodeida. “Since the Stockholm agreement on December 13, it is estimated that eight children have been killed or injured in Yemen every day,” Bachelet told the UN Human Rights Council on Wednesday. However, while fighting across the country continues, the shaky truce deal seems the only hope for peace. “The agreement is alive so long as both sides see it as preferable to a military confrontation for Hodeida,” Dickinson said. But she warned “there are enormous obstacles and challenges along the way.”last_img read more

Read More »

Modi calls Lanka Prez PM offers Indias help

first_imgNew Delhi: Prime Minister Narendra Modi called up the president and the premier of Sri Lanka and conveyed condolences over the loss of over lives in terrorist attacks in the island nation on Sunday. During his conversations with Sri Lankan President Maithripala Sirisena and Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe, Modi condemned the serial terrorist attacks in the strongest terms, perpetrated at sites including religious places and during a religious festival, according to a statement from the Prime Minister’s Office (PMO). Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c detailsDescribing the attacks as “cold-blooded and pre-planned barbaric acts”, Modi said these attacks were another grim reminder of the most serious challenge posed to the entire humanity by terrorism in our region and the entire world. The Prime Minister renewed the offer of all possible help and assistance to Sri Lanka for ensuring its security against the challenges such as those posed by terrorism, the PMO statement said. He also wished the injured speedy recovery and offered any required assistance for their treatment. “Strongly condemn the horrific blasts in Sri Lanka. There is no place for such barbarism in our region,” he tweeted. “My thoughts are with the bereaved families and prayers with the injured,” Modi said.last_img read more

Read More »

Gold slides on sluggish demand silver firms up

first_imgNew Delhi: Gold prices Wednesday fell by Rs 75 to Rs 32,870 per 10 gram at the bullion market here due to sluggish demand from jewellers amid weak trend overseas, according to the All India Sarafa Association. Silver however gained Rs 25 to Rs 38,525 per kg due to fresh offtake by industrial units and coin makers. Traders said besides tepid demand from local jewellers, a weak trend overseas influenced sentiment here, leading to decline in gold prices. Also Read – Commercial vehicle sales to remain subdued in current fiscal: Icra Globally, spot gold was trading lower at USD 1,282.10 an ounce, while silver was down at USD 14.99 an ounce in New York. In the national capital, gold of 99.9 per cent and 99.5 per cent purity dropped by Rs 75 each to Rs 32,870 and Rs 32,700 per 10 gram, respectively. Sovereign gold held steady at Rs 26,400 per eight gram. Silver ready advanced by Rs 25 to Rs 38,525 per kg and weekly-based delivery slumped by Rs 149 to Rs 37,073 per kg. On the other hand, silver coins held flat at Rs 80,000 for buying and Rs 81,000 for selling of 100 pieces.last_img read more

Read More »

In digital era govt to use Economic Census app

first_imgNew Delhi: The statistics ministry has decided to use mobile phone application for conducting 7th economic census beginning next month, which will speed up the process of data collection and analysis. The census will provide insights of all economic activities and ownership patterns of businesses across the country. The Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation (MoSPI) partnered with CSC e-Governance services India Ltd (CSC SPV) to conduct the census. Also Read – Commercial vehicle sales to remain subdued in current fiscal: Icra”The 7th economic census will be done using a mobile application. There will be two rounds of supervision to ensure quality of the census,” a CSC statement said. The CSC run common services centres (CSC), which are the access points for delivery of essential public utility services, social welfare schemes, healthcare, financial, education and agriculture services, apart from host of B2C (business to consumers) services to citizens in urban, rural and remote areas of the country. Also Read – Ashok Leyland stock tanks over 5 pc as co plans to suspend production for up to 15 days”We are planning to start the economic survey fieldwork in June and are expecting more than 6,000 training workshops to take place within a month for CSC enumerators. We are starting with a state level workshop in Madhya Pradesh and gradually will be spreading across all the states with the district level workshops,” MoSPI Secretary Pravin Srivastava said at an All India training of trainers workshop on census held at New Delhi. The ministry is also introducing geo-tagging which will help to find out the distribution of economic activity in a certain place, Srivastava said in the statement. “We have proposed to start the survey fieldwork from June 1 and the field work will be finished in 3 months only from the date of commencement and simultaneously results will be out in the phase manner. Nine lakh enumerators and 3 lakh supervisors will be involved in performing the survey,” informed MoSPI DG (ES and Survey) Jyotirmoy Poddar on the occasion. Village-level entrepreneurs have different skills and capabilities and they have proved it time and again. VLEs have sold more than 30 lakh Pradhan Mantri Shram Yogi Pension Yojana (PMSYM) in a short spam of time and this has created momentum at the local level. They do advocacy and campaigning for providing government services to the people, CSC SPV CEO Dinesh Tyagi said. “Conducting 7th economic census is very unique and will set a precedent for the entire country for carrying out a large-scale survey work like this. We have already done one round of training at the block level and I ensure that we will do best of our commitment,” he added.last_img read more

Read More »