Peery scores huge Wild West Shootout win at Siskiyou

first_imgBy Ben DeatherageYREKA, Calif. (June 14) – A quick decision late in the race paid off for Travis Peery.Originally from nearby Fort Jones, the North Dakota transplant won Sunday’s Wild West Modified Shootout feature at Siskiyou Motor Speedway.Peery started outside pole but the $1,000 Xtreme Motor Sports IMCA Modified victory was sealed un­til he made a split second decision and chose the right lane that took him through lapped traffic with two circuits left.After taking the lead at the drop of the green, Peery set a rapid pace interrupted only by cautions on laps 15 and 18.The second yellow involved Colorado pilot Ryan Gaylord, running second at the time. He spun into the infield and the second spot was inherited by North Dakota chauffeur Troy Heupel.Heupel nearly caught Peery on a couple occasions but each time Peery was able to pull away. Heavy lapped traffic came into play with just a few laps remaining and that’s when Peery picked the right line to work his way through.The win was Peery’s tour career second and his first at Siskiyou. He was already on the ballot for the Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational. Heupel, opening night winner Jesse Williamson, Jon DeBene­detti and Rob Ireland completed the top five.Eight states – Arizona, California, Colorado, Montana, Nevada, North Dakota, Oregon and Washing­ton – were represented by the 36 drivers signed in for the second event of the 2015 tour.Round three takes the Wild West Modified Shootout to Coos Bay Speedway on the Oregon Coast on Monday, June 15. This will be the first WWMS race at the facility since 2013 and Williamson was the winner that year.Feature results – 1. Travis Peery; 2. Troy Heupel; 3. Jesse Williamson; 4. Jon DeBenedetti; 5. Rob Ireland; 6. Danny Lauer; 7. B.J. Wild; 8. Alex Stanford; 9. Mark Wauge; 10. Troy Foulger; 11. Craig Cassell; 12. Paul Stone; 13. Joe German; 14. Troy Morris; 15. Collen Winebarger; 16. John Campos; 17. Nick Trenchard; 18. Zach Olson; 19. Ryan Gaylord; 20. Brian Poppa.last_img read more

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Will there be a taste of spring this week?

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest AccuWeather reports  a taste of spring later this week while the storm-battered region gets a break from nor’easters for several days. Even if temperatures just approach average for the end of March, it is likely to feel quite warm, compared to the weather of recent weeks with its snow, cold rain, clouds and/or gusty winds.  Ultimately, how warm it feels during the day will depend on the amount of sunshine as is often the case during March. The sun is as strong now as it is during the middle of September.  As long as winds are not very strong or a breeze is not blowing off a cold water source, it should feel comfortable from the late morning through the afternoon hours late this week.  What’s behind the recent cold and stormy weather? A blocking pattern in the jet stream trapped cold air over southeastern Canada and the northeastern United States during much of March. As storms moved in from the west and and south and encountered the cold air in place, they brought snow and strengthened.  The pattern will change just enough this week to cause storminess to shift well out to sea in the Atlantic and to the middle part of the nation. However, in between, a wedge of dry air is likely to set up shop over the Appalachians and along much of the Atlantic seaboard.    Fewer big storms, but more cold weather ahead The pattern may be somewhat of a spring tease, though. “Toward the end of the month and into the first part of April, colder air is likely to move back in,” according to AccuWeather Lead Long-Range Meteorologist Paul Pastelok. The route the cold air takes, from central Canada to the Midwest and then the Northeast, may suggest that the pattern that delivered the four nor’easters in three weeks has ended. During much of March, cold air pushed southward from eastern Canada and held its ground as storms approached. This blocking pattern effectively caused storms to slow down and strengthen along the mid-Atlantic and New England coasts. If the anchor for the cold air sets up over central Canada rather than Greenland during early April, storms that move into the Northeast may be less intense and not as long-lasting, increasing the chance for rain over snow, especially in the Interstate-95 corridor. During the early-April pattern, the lowest temperatures, relative to average, will be centered on the Upper Midwest and Great Lakes to perhaps the central and northern Appalachians. The upcoming pattern is likely to translate to some hard freezes and wintry precipitation for this zone and perhaps some frost over parts of the interior Southeast. On sunny days in the pattern, daytime temperatures along the Eastern Seaboard may still recover to near average on at least some days during early April. The air mass will reveal its cold identity each night, however.last_img read more

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Is your smart city in danger of paranoid insanity?

first_imgHow Connected Communities Can Bolster Your Busi… Tags:#IEET#IoT#security#Smart Cities#smart city How IoT Will Play an Important Role in Traffic … Surveillance at the Heart of Smart Cities Related Posts center_img Though Sci-Fi has long explored robots struggling with human emotions, technology experts now warn that smart cities are evolving into vast artificial organisms that may soon have psychological issues of their own.The topic was raised recently by Marcelo Rinesi, Chief Technology Officer of the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies (IEET) in Boston.Against the backdrop of smart cities becoming an increasingly potent driver of technology, Rinesi discussed the psychological well-being of the smart cities themselves, not the citizens that inhabit them.See also: Global smart cities market could reach $3.5 billion by 2026?“Why not? We are building smart cities to be able to sense, think, and act,” he said. “Their perceptions, thoughts, and actions won’t be remotely human, or even biological, but that doesn’t make them any less real.”He says smart cities are currently a collection of disjointed processes that give them only partial awareness. This perceived information, from sensors or security cameras, flows slowly from silo to silo, if at all.The one exception to the fragmented nature of smart city intelligence is in threat perception and security.Only when a smart city is under a security alert do we see something approaching complete integration, with all scraps of information and sensor data knitted together in central databases. All city services are then coordinated to follow a single, holistic plan to respond to these security issues.“Right now we’re building cities that see the world mostly in terms of cars and terrorism threats,” he says. “A mind that sees everything and puts together very little except when it scares it.”A smart city just an “incredibly complex machine?”But Rinesi says smart cities have the potential to grasp much more than just knowing which citizen is a “person of interest” and where to route emergency services to deal with terrorist situations.He says that a smart city is just an incredibly complex machine we live in. And we can choose what this machine with a hive mind focuses on, beyond security.“It doesn’t need to be like that,” Rinesi says. “The psychology of a smart city, how it integrates its multiple perceptions, what it can think about, how it chooses what to do and why, all of that is up to us.”Instead the computational “brains” behind smart cities can be designed to weave together knowledge on other issues like the medical health and quality of life of its citizens.“We could build it to have a sense of itself and of its inhabitants, to perceive needs and be constantly trying to help,” says Rinesi. “A city whose mind, vaguely and perhaps unconsciously intuited behind its ubiquitous and thus invisible cameras, we find comforting. A sane mind.” For Self-Driving Systems, Infrastructure and In… Donal Powerlast_img read more

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Asian Games: India go down to Kuwait

first_imgIndia put up a brave fight before going down 0-2 against Kuwait to get off their Asian Games football campaign on a disappointing note in Guangzhou, China, on Sunday.Sukhwinder Singh’s boys were on equal terms against their stronger rivals for most part of the match. They paid the price of conceding an early goal and letting in another via a defensive lapse in injury time.Striker Khaled Al Azemi scored both the goals – in the sixth and 91st minute – for Kuwait at the Huadu Stadium.India will now have to beat either defending champions Qatar on Tuesday or Singapore on Thursday to have any chance of remaining in contention for a berth in the knock-out round.The top two teams from each of four groups and the four best third- placed teams will qualify for the Round of 16.India were on the backfoot as early as in the sixth minute with Al Azemi finding the target even as the Indians were trying to settle down. Al Azemi found the target from an opportunistic shot after a Kuwaiti free- kick from outside the box deflected from an Indian defender.India dominated the secondhalf but wasted at least three chances to equalise. They conceded the second goal in the first of the three- minute injury time with the back pass from an Indian defender to goalkeeper Laxmikant Kattimany, who started instead of Gurpreet Singh Sandhu, landing on Kuwaiti striker Al Azemi.Despite the loss, Sukhwinder was happy with the performance of his boys and said his side still has the chance to make it to the knock- out round.”It was an evenly contested match. Kuwait converted two from the three chances they got. We had at least three chances to equalise in the second half. So overall, I am happy with the performance of the boys,” he said . Except for Kattimani manning the goal, Sukhwinder began with the team that lost 1-3 to Vietnam in Cuttack last month in the only friendly match in the run- up to the Asian Games.The Asian Games will officially open on November 12 but the football competition kicked off on Sunday and will conclude on November 25.ResultsGroup D Kuwait beat India 2-0 Qatar draw Singapore 0- 0 Group E Uzbekistan beat Bangladesh 3-0 UAE draw Hong Kong 1-1 Group F Oman beat Maldives 3-0 Thailand beat Pakistan 6-0advertisement- With inputs from PTIlast_img read more

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Melissa Joan Hart Joins Once Upon A Birth Campaign

first_imgMelissa Joan Hart has joined Merck for Mother’s Once Upon a Birth campaign.Every few seconds, in every corner of the globe, a mother welcomes a baby into the world. A new U.S. consumer survey confirmed that nearly every parent characterizes this moment as “life-changing,” and it is celebrated as a happy occasion. However, what is not often discussed is that childbirth can be a very dangerous time for a woman. According to the World Health Organization, every two minutes somewhere in the world a woman dies during pregnancy or childbirth.As part of Merck’s ongoing efforts to reduce the rates of maternal mortality around the world, Merck for Mothers launched a pilot program in the United States on Thursday, October 25, 2012 titled “Once Upon a Birth.” Every story shared, triggers a donation from Merck to Join My Village, a program from CARE that empowers women and girls, and supports safe pregnancies and deliveries.Melissa Joan Hart shared her birth story as part of the campaign, and celebrated the special new addition to her family.“It really is the perfect timing for me to be a part of this, having just given birth to Tucker,” she told OMG. “I’ve gone to Facebook and shared my birth story. Now I’m just passing on the word for people to go there to share their stories too. For every story shared, they’re making a donation to Join My Village. … 90 percent of deaths related to pregnancy and childbirth are actually preventable. And this happens here in the U.S. and it happens all over the world. It’s just so sad. So the Once Upon a Birth campaign is an incredible thing to do for mothers all over the world.”You can read Melissa’s story here.Help make sure that no birth story goes untold. Help honor all of the moms who are not here to share their story. Help make this an issue that receives the global attention it deserves so that in the not-so-distant future, maternal mortality becomes history.Help support mothers around the world by visiting www.Facebook.com/MerckforMothers and sharing your story on the “Once Upon a Birth” tab!last_img read more

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