Caring for Young Military Children’s Mental Health

first_imgMay 9 is National Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day. We don’t usually think about “mental health” in terms of very young children, so to help explore it in more familiar terms, I took the World Health Organization’s definition of mental health and whittled it down to child-size.Mental health is a state of well-being in which the child:realizes his or her own abilities,can cope with the stresses of life,can pursue his or her desire to play and learn,and experiences a sense of belonging and value in his or her social groups (e.g, family, classroom).Those who care for and teach young children professionally have the privilege and responsibility of nurturing each of these characteristics in every child. That role can take on even more importance for children from military families. Military family life by its very nature typically means lots of changes for children – some of them very BIG changes, and most of them coming as a result of events over which they have no control. Even the youngest child feels the stress.A knowledgeable, responsive caregiver can be a valuable source of comfort and help in coping. But supporting military children’s mental health and emotional well-being doesn’t require a degree in social work or counseling. Think again about those four characteristics of mental health in a child.You help a child realize his own abilities by……talking with him about what he can do to stay connected to his deployed parent, help the parent who is still at home, or welcome the returning parent home. Then make sure he has everything he needs to carry out his plan.…allowing him to make choices – lots of them! Express your trust in his ability to figure out problems and make plans (with only the support from you that he needs to succeed).…noticing and commenting when he is thoughtful toward a friend or manages a conflict well, especially if it’s during a time when you know he is under the stress of changes or difficult circumstances.You help a child cope with the stresses of life by……letting her act out her thoughts and emotions about her military mom or dad in her pretend play, even when that means acting out scenes with death, injury or other frightening events.…reading books with her that have characters dealing with some of the same emotions and difficult situations that she is facing. Give her encouragement and time to share her thoughts and feelings with you.…creating a safe place where her thoughts and feelings can be expressed, acknowledged and understood.You help a child pursue his desire to play and learn by……giving him big chunks of unstructured time for him to follow his own curiosity.…listening to the questions he asks and the observations he makes, then providing him with materials and experiences that will enable him to explore even further. Recognize that his play will give you a special window on the way he sees and understands his world, so pay attention!…respecting the large space that military experiences and concepts take up in his thoughts and feelings, and therefore in his play and learning. Recognize their importance to his developing sense of self.You help a child experience a sense of belonging and value in her social groups by……finding ways to make her feel at home and part of the group from the moment she walks in your door for the first time.…allowing her to choose children to become friends with, and giving them ample time to develop their relationship. Friendship is one of the best buffers for children under stress.…working hard to create a strong partnership with her parents right from the start. Seeing a positive relationship between her parents and teacher creates a sense of security and belonging for her.The life of a military child includes changes in relationships, changes in surroundings, and changes in routines. Those changes can be very unsettling. By offering a place where the child knows what to expect each day, and where those expectations are of joy and safety and belonging, we are offering firm ground for him or her to stand on amid the changes.We’re fostering mental health. by Kathy Reschkelast_img read more

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Your Leadership Value Proposition

first_imgYour company has a value proposition. There is something that you do that your client’s perceive as valuable enough to choose you over all of your competitors. There’s a reason your client’s buy what you sell and there is a reason they buy from you.Your company also has an employee value proposition. There’s a promise made about the value of working for your company. That’s what attracts employees to you (or what could).But what do you provide in the way of a leadership value proposition that makes you worth following? What’s your leadership value proposition?VisionDoes your leadership value proposition include some vision of a compelling future? Is that vision where you want to take the company? Or is it a vision that inspires your team and gives them something they can get behind?What is the inspiring vision that makes up your leadership value proposition?MeaningAlong those same lines, what does it mean to be a part of your team and follow you? How does your leadership value proposition speak to meaning? Meaning is identity. Meaning is culture. A leaders provides meaning, creates a culture, and protects that culture.Why is it important to be who you are and do what you do?GrowthWho do the people that follow you become by doing so? Do they grow in their abilities? Are they being stretched and challenged in new ways? Does following you prepare them for that growth?Does your leadership value proposition speak to growth?CaringDoes your leadership value proposition include a component of caring? Does following you mean that your team gains a servant leader, someone dedicated to their success? Or does following you mean your employees serve you?There is a difference between employees and followers. Managing and leading are different. People may choose to work for you and still not follow you. But people that choose to follow you will work for you, and in a much different way than they would if they were simply employees. Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

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Ryan Madson And The Dodgers Are Faltering When It Matters Most

BOSTON — For the second-straight chilly night in Fenway Park, Los Angeles Dodgers reliever Ryan Madson faced one of baseball’s great psychological performance tests. And for the second-straight night, Madson failed.A pitcher, the defense, dictates the action in baseball, which makes the game unusual. Standing alone in the center of the infield, a pitcher can get in his own way — and he can single-handedly let a game get away. And for a second-straight World Series game, Madson checked both of these boxes as he couldn’t command the ball. With each miss outside the strike zone, the pressure and decibel levels increased in the cramped, 106-year-old ballpark.Madson inherited two base runners on Tuesday in Game 1 of the World Series and three on Wednesday in Game 2. All five scored. They were the decisive runs Tuesday and again Wednesday in Boston’s 4-2 victory. The Red Sox now enjoy a 2-0 lead in the series, which heads to Los Angeles for Game 3 on Friday.When Madson entered Wednesday with two outs in the bottom of the fifth inning, it was the most crucial point in the game. Leverage index is a stat designed to weight the importance of every plate appearance in a game as it relates to potential win expectancy swings, with an average plate appearance at a mark of 1.0. A plate appearance in a one-run game in the ninth inning has a greater leverage-index value than that of a one-run game in, say, the second inning. The leverage index of facing Steve Pearce with the bases loaded and two outs, leading by one run, was 4.17 — the highest of the game and second-highest of the series.Madson, who walked just 16 batters in 52⅔ regular-season innings, began his Game 2 outing by missing badly above the zone with his first two pitches against Pearce. The crowd roared. Red Sox fans began chanting his last name, perhaps sensing weakness. Wearing just a short-sleeve T-shirt under his game jersey, Madson jumped up and down at the back of the mound to try to warm himself in temperatures that had dipped into the low 40s, feeling colder with the wind chill. But he missed twice again above the zone to walk Pearce on five pitches, forcing in Christian Vazquez and tying the score at 2-2.“I really liked him against Pearce,” said Los Angeles manager Dave Roberts. “He’s done it time and time again for us.”Madson also entered, and faltered, in a high-leverage situation Tuesday. His first pitch in Game 1 was a wild pitch against Pearce, whom he walked on four pitches.“The ball is not going where I want it,” Madson said after the game. “It’s kind of a crapshoot with inherited runners. You can be good at it for a long time and then a bloop hit, or a walk like tonight, it’s not automatic. I don’t know if it’s mechanical or physical or emotional. There is a lot of elements going in there. You just have to regroup and start over again.”Among Dodgers pitchers, Madson has pitched four of the five highest-leverage situations through two games. The Dodgers’ best reliever, Kenley Jansen, hasn’t pitched in the series. While teams have been aggressive in employing relief pitchers this postseason, Roberts has not yet used his best reliever when there have clearly been crucial situations. Instead, a pitcher the Dodgers had claimed off waivers and traded for on Aug. 31 — who had a 5.28 ERA in Washington and a 6.48 mark in a limited sample in L.A. — got the call.1In a small sample of postseason work, Madson had been effective for Roberts entering the World Series. Madson also did strike out 13 batters in 8⅓ regular-season innings with the Dodgers .After walking Pearce on Wednesday, Madson missed with his first pitch to the following batter, J.D. Martinez, and then Madson threw a fastball that found the zone. But Martinez, hobbling on a right ankle he injured Tuesday, sliced it down the right-field line for a two-run single. Boston took a 4-2 lead that held as the final score. The leverage index of that plate appearance? 3.6. It marked the second-greatest leverage index of the game after the Pearce at bat.Madson told reporters before the game that the cold weather affected his grip in Game 1, referencing the sticky stuff that has become a sticky subject this season.“Grip is essential, obviously, in a breaking ball,” Madson said before Game 2. “And a lot of times with the cold weather, I’m not saying anybody uses anything, but if you use anything, a lot of times it’s not as effective in cold weather.“I didn’t use anything [Tuesday], but I didn’t throw any breaking balls. But [Wednesday], I’m going to make sure I’ve got what everybody uses, the essentials out there again. I didn’t think it was going to be as difficult as it was [Tuesday].”Whatever he did, Madson had a tough time again Wednesday.Interestingly, Madson’s four-seam fastball had an average spin rate of 2,289 rpms on Tuesday and 2,196 on Wednesday, and that pitch’s velocity was 95.5 mph on Tuesday and 94.8 on Wednesday — not far removed from his regular-season averages of 2,250 rpms and 95.9 mph. So while his command wavered, his underlying stuff was nearly the same.The Red Sox had no trouble with the cool conditions Wednesday as their relievers again dominated, averaging 98.4 mph on all fastballs. Starter David Price and the bullpen retired the final 16 Dodgers they faced.Price took another step toward shedding his reputation as a postseason choker after burying some of his postseason demons in Game 5 of the American League Championship Series — his first win in 12 career postseason starts. He did it by adopting a new plan, throwing his change-up at a career-high rate and shelving his cut fastball. He used a similar approach Wednesday and did not allow a hit through the first three innings. He often went in with his fastball and down and away with his changeup.He gave up two runs in the fourth but returned for a scoreless fifth — going where no starter had gone in Game 1 — and even posted a scoreless inning in the sixth.Price now has two postseason wins in his last two starts. A week ago, Price couldn’t win in the postseason. So there’s hope for Ryan Madson.Check out our latest MLB predictions. read more

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Commentary Coaches expect players to Do as I say not as I

If Ohio State athletes are expected to follow the rules and to not confuse their status with power, OSU coaches and athletic administrators need to set a better example. On Tuesday, the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles concluded its investigation into the purchase of 25 cars by OSU athletes, declaring that these purchases were legitimate. Included in the 65-page report from the BMV is a transcript of an investigation conducted by Tim Shaw, investigator for the BMV. Shaw’s transcription included an interview, conducted on May 12, with Aaron Kniffin, a former employee of Jack Maxton Chevrolet. In the interview, Kniffin said that no players or their family members received special deals on their cars. Also included in the report, Shaw recorded Kniffin as saying that several OSU coaches received cars to drive, in exchange for tickets. “Kniffin also stated that Jack Maxton owner Jeff Mauk received tickets from OSU coaches for giving them cars to drive,” Shaw reported. “Kniffin stated that this practice was common.” Common? Coaches are going to give tickets to car dealerships in exchange for the chance to drive nice cars, but expect the opposite from their players? Do as I say, not as I do. OSU coaches are making more than enough money to buy their own vehicles. The “common” practice of coaches trading tickets for their own personal gain is not an NCAA violation. University spokesman Jim Lynch told The Lantern that these exchanges are a part of a program written in the coach’s contract. Lynch said these practices are on-par with other Big Ten schools. But it doesn’t look good. On Aug. 16, 2010, the BMV conducted a separate investigation. Led by BMV investigators Tim Hughes and Todd Ballinger, this investigation made some interesting observations concerning dealer-plated cars. In their report, they dictated their visits to the Woody Hayes Athletic Complex to investigate this possible misuse of dealer tags given to players. They found that while they visited, a high number of vehicles in the parking lots surrounding the WHAC were owned by dealerships. They concluded that OSU coaches and administrators were driving these cars. Ballinger also reported that Doug Archie, an associate athletics director for compliance and camps at OSU, was driving a dealer-owned vehicle. “Archie advised that he has a dealer-plated vehicle and he gets the vehicle in exchange for tickets,” Ballinger reported. In the same report, Archie told investigators that there was only one reason a player would be driving a dealer-owned vehicle. “(An) OSU student athlete would only be allowed to operate a ‘loaner’ vehicle from (a) motor vehicle dealer if their personal vehicle was at the dealership for service or repair,” Ballinger reported. So why is there a double standard? OSU officials and coaches preach humility and service to their players, but what kind of lesson is that coming from someone trading football tickets to car dealerships to drive around a nice car? Currently, the NCAA does not have the jurisdiction to ban this “tickets for cars” practice, as long as it isn’t athletes making the trades. The university, however, has the power to control it. The university has a lot of issues to deal with currently, including a meeting with the NCAA on Aug. 12, but this is one issue that should be on their radar. While the NCAA may not consider this kind of activity to be “improper benefits,” every part about this “common” practice is improper, backwards and wrong. read more

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Womens golf Coach Therese Hession looking for 4th straight Big Ten championship

OSU women’s golf coach Therese Hession congratulates senior women’s golfer Katja Pogacar. Credit: Courtesy of OSU AthleticsOhio State women’s golf coach Therese Hession thought she could never be persuaded to coach anywhere other than her alma mater, Southern Methodist University. But after 11 years on the LPGA tour, she got a call from OSU and decided to give it a shot. Twenty-five seasons later, she’s still coaching the Buckeyes.“The call came, I was at the U.S. Open,” Hession said of when she was offered the job at OSU. “I talked to my pro that was my teacher on the tour and he said, ‘You have everything to gain, nothing to lose.’ So here I am 25 years later.”Hession fell in love with the game at an early age while following her dad around the golf course. She went to the driving range or the course any chance she could get. “I was just my happiest when I was out playing golf,” Hession said.Hession attended SMU where she led the women’s golf team to a national championship in 1979 — her senior season. After graduation, she joined the Women’s Professional Golf Tour and was granted an LPGA tour card just three months later.After 11 years competing in the LPGA, Hession was growing weary of the lifestyle. “I still loved to play but I didn’t like the idea of being away from home probably 32 weeks of the year,” Hession said. “My game was good. I was improving, but I was never at the very highest level of some of the players I was competing against. So I think I was looking for change, but I still really loved the sport.”That’s where the Buckeyes stepped in. At first, Hession admits she was hesitant to accept the position. However, there were a lot of positive things about OSU that Hession couldn’t deny, such as being close to her hometown of Indianapolis. Even though OSU isn’t a typical golf school, Hession saw potential in the program.“That was important to me: to be able to go somewhere where I thought I could do well because I knew I was going to put 100 percent effort into it. And I wanted to make sure I would have the chance to succeed,” Hession said. And succeed she has. In her time in Columbus, Hession has led the Buckeyes to 10 Big Ten championships, including three consecutive titles from 2014 to 2016, made 23 NCAA regional appearances and 15 NCAA championship appearances. She has been named the National Coach of the Year twice and Big Ten Coach of the Year seven times. The most memorable moment of Hession’s coaching career was in 2003 when her team took home fourth place at the NCAA championship, the highest in school history. Hession’s goal is still to win a national championship, but the 2003 season proved that OSU could compete with the best. “I like to prove people wrong and for those people who think the northern schools can’t play, to be able to finish that well was good,” she said. “I was really happy for my players because they worked hard. That was a real special group.”The past three seasons, Hession has led the Buckeyes to back-to-back-to-back Big Ten championships. Last year, the team shot so high in the first round that they started on the back nine the next day. But that’s when OSU decided to turn it on. “I remember on Saturday we were really on fire,” Hession said. “I remember coming up the ninth hole and it was like everywhere I looked everyone was making birdies.”The 2017 Big Ten Championship is coming up on April 21 and the competition is even tougher this year. The Buckeyes are one of the more experienced teams but will have to play at the very top of their game to be in the race. “I would say we could play decent and we could even finish sixth is how good the Big Ten is this year,” Hession said. “So it’s going to be really critical to get off to a good start.”Throughout her 25 seasons, Hession has made an impact on her players on and off the course. Senior Jessica Porvasnik has spent four years under Hession and credits her for making her the player that she is today. “Coach Hession has always had the best interest of every player on her team,” Porvasnik said. “She has spent countless hours helping prepare me for what lies ahead in my career… I believe after college she will continue to play a role in my life.”Hession’s work and dedication don’t end on the golf course but extend into everything she does. In 1989, she was awarded the LPGA Tour Samaritan Award for her work with Habitat for Humanity and Fellowship of Christian Athletes. She has continued her philanthropic work through her coaching to this day.“We’re trying to raise $15,000 as a team,” Hession said of her team’s most recent project. “We’re building a well for a village in Africa that doesn’t have water. Their girls get up in the morning and they walk over an hour to the nearest water source.” The Buckeyes golf team has completed fundraising projects already, but have a few more to go in order to reach the goal. “I think it’s really important that we’ve been given a lot, so we should give back,” Hession said. read more

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Mens Basketball Young Ohio State team struggles in conference play

Ohio State head coach Chris Holtmann calls out to the Buckeye defense in the first half of the game against Iowa on Feb. 10 in the Schottenstein Center. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Managing Editor for DesignAnalyze, then forget. This is freshman guard Duane Washington’s response to any loss: Look at game tape, analyze what went wrong for him personally and the team as a whole, fix the mistakes and forget; move on to the next game. This was his approach after Ohio State’s three-point loss to Rutgers on Wednesday, hoping this mentality would help the Buckeyes ahead of its Saturday game on the road against Iowa. It didn’t. The same problems persisted: the fouls, the turnovers, the inconsistent offense. This led to Ohio State’s first three-game losing streak in head coach Chris Holtmann’s tenure and the Buckeyes falling out of the Associated Press Top 25 poll for the first time since Week 2. For the second-year head coach, competing solely in Big Ten play is a different animal, facing opponents in games that seem to mean more in the long run, especially for a team without much experience. The Buckeyes had a taste of conference play early in December, earning wins against Minnesota and Illinois. However, with the shift to 2019 and a permanent conference schedule, Ohio State has not found the same success.“I think it begins with an awareness that this is life in a power conference. This is life in league play,” Holtmann said. “You are going to go through some serious bumps and bruises.” Now, as Ohio State moves forward, amid the most serious bumps and bruises Holtmann has ever had to deal with regarding this team, it has to turn to something the Buckeyes do not have much of: leadership. The Buckeyes don’t have the Keita Bates-Diop, the Jae’Sean Tate, playing with a fire to make up for what they considered to be a lost 2016-17 season, ending their collegiate careers with winning 13-of-17 conference games. However, what Holtmann realizes is that Ohio State is remarkably young. Despite players on the roster such as redshirt senior guard Keyshawn Woods and senior guard C.J. Jackson, many of the players Ohio State utilizes the most are either freshmen or sophomores, leaning on sophomore forward Kaleb Wesson as its main offensive contributor and post threat. Holtmann said plainly he often forgets Wesson, the player who averages 16.2 points and 6.9 rebounds per game, is a sophomore.  “Sometimes I forget that we have other guys that are sophomores and freshman,” Holtmann said. “That doesn’t change our expectation and our demands on them, but I do need to, at times, remember that we are asking guys that are relatively young to lead our group.”  Holtmann said Wesson leads in part by his consistency during games, showing that he wants to be a leader vocally, and becomes an example especially for the post players, an area the head coach said is a necessary improvement.But youth is something that sophomore forward Kyle Young prides himself on. “Some people think that a leader is just the older guys like seniors and stuff like that. I think coaches do a good job of kind of making it a point that leaders are guys who step in and teach others and help to make the team better,” Young said. “I think the earlier the better, you know, that we learn these important values will help our team get better.” As of late, youth has hurt Ohio State more than it has helped. In the past three losses, Wesson recorded at least four fouls, leaving the game within the first two minutes of the Iowa game after recording two quick fouls.After only five turnovers in the Buckeyes’ nine-point loss to then-No. 8 Michigan State, Ohio State has recorded double-digit turnovers in each of its past two games, breaking its season high with 21 against the Hawkeyes Saturday. Ohio State also has not had consistency in its rotation, playing all 10 eligible scholarship players in the first half of the Iowa loss, with each player ending the game with more than 10 minutes on the court. Holtmann knows the expectation for this team. It’s the expectation to perform like Ohio State did during the first 13 games of the season. But he understands the players he is utilizing and what their capabilities are. “It’s a balance really between that understanding and yet the urgency of wanting it to happen right now, and I think that the reality is we need to learn quickly,” Holtmann said. “I don’t want our relative newness … to be something that we use as an excuse. I also want to have and understand that we have to, as coaches, be committed to teaching it better, reinforcing it more and making sure that our guys are getting it.” This is not the 2017-18 team. Ohio State does not have Tate or Bates-Diop to create a rallying cry after a loss. But Holtmann believes this team has the potential to be that. It just might take some more time and more leadership by the younger players. “We’ll go as far as our collective leadership takes us,” Holtmann said. “I really believe that.” read more

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Hakim Ziyech named 2018 Dutch Footballer of the Year

first_imgAjax midfielder Hakim Ziyech has won the 2018 Dutch Footballer of the Year award, also called the “Gouden Schoen” (Golden Boot)Ziyech had a remarkable campaign at the Amsterdam Arena last season and managed nine goals and 14 assists in 34 appearances.The 25-year-old becomes the third Moroccan to win the award following Mounir El Hamdaoui in 2009 and Karim El Ahmadi last year.Now Ziyech is hoping to continue his rich vein of form in what he describes as the “best phase” of his career.“I’m very happy here and I think I’m in the best phase of my career,” said Ziyech, according to BBC.He was also voted Ajax’s player of the season by the fans.“Ziyech is a piece of jewellery for Dutch football,” Ajax coach Erik ten Hag said.edwin van der sarReport: Van der Sar staying at Ajax for now George Patchias – September 12, 2019 Edwin van der Sar will not be leaving Ajax to take up a job at Manchester United.In the last few days, one bookmaker suspended…“I think he plays football in a nice team, with lots of good footballers around him and it runs smoothly, which gives him pleasure and motivation to achieve even more.”Ziyech has scored two goals in four league appearances for Ajax this season.Let us introduce to you…?Player of the Year 2018:? HAKIM ZIYECH ??? pic.twitter.com/d67rhWqbrl— AFC Ajax (English) (@AFCAjax_EN) September 3, 2018last_img read more

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Former football coach jailed for child abuse

first_imgJames Torbett, who was involved in setting up the Celtic Boys Club in Scotland, abused his position of trust to sexually abuse three boysThe High Court in Glasgow has sentenced 71-year-old James Torbett for abusing his position of trust and sexually abusing three boys.The former football coach was involved in setting up Celtic Boys Club according to Sky Sports.“Your involvement in setting up and organizing the activities of youth football in Celtic Boys Club might in other circumstances have appeared public-spirited and commendable,” judge Lord Beckett said before sentencing Torbett to six years in prison.“However, what this case has shown is that you used the club as a front and a recruiting ground for boys who you could sexually abuse.”“The love which young boys have for the game of football, their competitive spirit, their dreams of playing professionally and perceived association with Celtic Football Club, which is a revered institution for a significant part of the population, gave you substantial power over the boys whom you coached,” he added.“You groomed boys and contrived situations when you could abuse them. Yours was some of the most corrupting behaviors I have heard of in these courts.”last_img read more

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Invitation to Apply for Membership of The National Youth Council

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#TurksandCaicos, January 3, 2018 – Providenciales – The National Youth Council consists of young adult volunteers between the ages of 18-30 from around the country.  They are young professional volunteers, who serve as Council Advisors committed to empower, strengthen and advise Government on issues affecting youth.If you are interested in working to develop the situation of young persons between the ages of 10-29 years old, you are welcomed to apply.What defines youth in Turks and Caicos.   Those between 10 and 29 years old are considered youth by the Department of Youth Affairs.   In order to join National Youth Council or volunteer with National Youth council?Please express your interest by emailing any of our youth officers [email protected][email protected]  or Mr. Nixon Dickenson, Acting National Youth Director at [email protected]: TCIG Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:last_img read more

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