Lessons learned in Ohio’s updated fertilizer recommendations

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest At the recent 4R Field Day in Hardin County, Ohio State soil fertility specialist Steve Culman presented on the updated fertilizer recommendations through 300+ on-farm strip trials since 2014.He said some main take-home points he hoped to get across to agriculturalists were:From 2014 – 2017, 300+ on-farm strip trials were conducted across Ohio evaluating corn, soybean and wheat response to N, P and K fertilizer.Yield responses to P and K fertilizer in soils at or above the current maintenance range were very rare.Long-term data from 3 sites show that when Ohio soils are in the current maintenance range, they can supply sufficient P and K to meet corn and soybean demand for many growing seasons without fertilization.Recommended corn N rates were updated this spring and are based on maximizing farmer profitability, not maximizing yields.Corn, soybean and wheat are yielding more grain with less nutrient: Grain nutrient removal per bushel of grain is lower than it was 20 years ago.Further details in this video.last_img read more

Read More »

Photos: Alabama Players Are Very Jealous Of Nick Saban’s New Car, Which Is Awesome

first_imgHead coach Nick Saban of the Alabama Crimson Tide celebrates with the trophy after defeating the Notre Dame Fighting Irish in the 2013 Discover BCS National Championship game.MIAMI GARDENS, FL – JANUARY 07: Head coach Nick Saban of the Alabama Crimson Tide celebrates with the trophy after defeating the Notre Dame Fighting Irish in the 2013 Discover BCS National Championship game at Sun Life Stadium on January 7, 2013 in Miami Gardens, Florida. Alabama won the game by a score of 42-14. (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)Nick Saban has a new car. It’s a shiny Mercedes-Benz and, yes, it is awesome. The Alabama head coach apparently drove it to the Crimson Tide’s football facility today. And, unsurprisingly, Saban’s players were very impressed by it. I just want yall to understand how Saban kilt the game today….. Smh boy boy boy pic.twitter.com/xBH7aJ9uap— Alphonse Taylor (@SHANKK50) June 10, 2015pic.twitter.com/gq4Bu3U87i— Juice (@D_4Charlot) June 11, 2015When I saw Saban’s new whip, I thought he was James Bond or some B lol— Khi (@MekhiBrownFFF) June 10, 2015Saban’s car bruh!! pic.twitter.com/AtDADg1j9L— Brandon (@SabanNation_15) June 10, 2015It’s good to be the head coach of the University of Alabama’s football program. It’s very, very good. [BamaOnLine]last_img read more

Read More »

Womens golf Coach Therese Hession looking for 4th straight Big Ten championship

OSU women’s golf coach Therese Hession congratulates senior women’s golfer Katja Pogacar. Credit: Courtesy of OSU AthleticsOhio State women’s golf coach Therese Hession thought she could never be persuaded to coach anywhere other than her alma mater, Southern Methodist University. But after 11 years on the LPGA tour, she got a call from OSU and decided to give it a shot. Twenty-five seasons later, she’s still coaching the Buckeyes.“The call came, I was at the U.S. Open,” Hession said of when she was offered the job at OSU. “I talked to my pro that was my teacher on the tour and he said, ‘You have everything to gain, nothing to lose.’ So here I am 25 years later.”Hession fell in love with the game at an early age while following her dad around the golf course. She went to the driving range or the course any chance she could get. “I was just my happiest when I was out playing golf,” Hession said.Hession attended SMU where she led the women’s golf team to a national championship in 1979 — her senior season. After graduation, she joined the Women’s Professional Golf Tour and was granted an LPGA tour card just three months later.After 11 years competing in the LPGA, Hession was growing weary of the lifestyle. “I still loved to play but I didn’t like the idea of being away from home probably 32 weeks of the year,” Hession said. “My game was good. I was improving, but I was never at the very highest level of some of the players I was competing against. So I think I was looking for change, but I still really loved the sport.”That’s where the Buckeyes stepped in. At first, Hession admits she was hesitant to accept the position. However, there were a lot of positive things about OSU that Hession couldn’t deny, such as being close to her hometown of Indianapolis. Even though OSU isn’t a typical golf school, Hession saw potential in the program.“That was important to me: to be able to go somewhere where I thought I could do well because I knew I was going to put 100 percent effort into it. And I wanted to make sure I would have the chance to succeed,” Hession said. And succeed she has. In her time in Columbus, Hession has led the Buckeyes to 10 Big Ten championships, including three consecutive titles from 2014 to 2016, made 23 NCAA regional appearances and 15 NCAA championship appearances. She has been named the National Coach of the Year twice and Big Ten Coach of the Year seven times. The most memorable moment of Hession’s coaching career was in 2003 when her team took home fourth place at the NCAA championship, the highest in school history. Hession’s goal is still to win a national championship, but the 2003 season proved that OSU could compete with the best. “I like to prove people wrong and for those people who think the northern schools can’t play, to be able to finish that well was good,” she said. “I was really happy for my players because they worked hard. That was a real special group.”The past three seasons, Hession has led the Buckeyes to back-to-back-to-back Big Ten championships. Last year, the team shot so high in the first round that they started on the back nine the next day. But that’s when OSU decided to turn it on. “I remember on Saturday we were really on fire,” Hession said. “I remember coming up the ninth hole and it was like everywhere I looked everyone was making birdies.”The 2017 Big Ten Championship is coming up on April 21 and the competition is even tougher this year. The Buckeyes are one of the more experienced teams but will have to play at the very top of their game to be in the race. “I would say we could play decent and we could even finish sixth is how good the Big Ten is this year,” Hession said. “So it’s going to be really critical to get off to a good start.”Throughout her 25 seasons, Hession has made an impact on her players on and off the course. Senior Jessica Porvasnik has spent four years under Hession and credits her for making her the player that she is today. “Coach Hession has always had the best interest of every player on her team,” Porvasnik said. “She has spent countless hours helping prepare me for what lies ahead in my career… I believe after college she will continue to play a role in my life.”Hession’s work and dedication don’t end on the golf course but extend into everything she does. In 1989, she was awarded the LPGA Tour Samaritan Award for her work with Habitat for Humanity and Fellowship of Christian Athletes. She has continued her philanthropic work through her coaching to this day.“We’re trying to raise $15,000 as a team,” Hession said of her team’s most recent project. “We’re building a well for a village in Africa that doesn’t have water. Their girls get up in the morning and they walk over an hour to the nearest water source.” The Buckeyes golf team has completed fundraising projects already, but have a few more to go in order to reach the goal. “I think it’s really important that we’ve been given a lot, so we should give back,” Hession said. read more

Read More »

Protein spy gains new abilities

first_imghttp://news.rice.edu/files/2017/04/0501_PROTEIN-3-WEB-1a6deye.jpgRice University graduate student Emily Thomas led a team that created a method to label proteins being produced in cells. The labels enable researchers to acquire a snapshot of proteins being produced by a cell at a given time. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,879 undergraduates and 2,861 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for happiest students and for lots of race/class interaction by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/RiceUniversityoverview. ShareEditor’s note: Links to high-resolution images for download appear at the end of this release. David [email protected] [email protected] ‘spy’ gains new abilitiesRice University researchers build a novel switch to facilitate tagging of proteins in a cell HOUSTON – (April 27, 2017) – Rice University scientists have learned to spy on cells with a divide-and-conquer strategy to label proteins.Graduate student Emily Thomas, synthetic biologist Jonathan Silberg and their colleagues built upon established techniques that attach bio-orthogonal (noninterfering), artificial amino acids to transfer RNA (tRNA), which are used by ribosomes to synthesize proteins.Because the amino acids are “noncanonical,” they are effective tags that help researchers identify proteins being synthesized in a cell. The Rice lab’s breakthrough was the discovery of a tRNA synthetase that only adds the amino acid to the tRNA when it binds a chemical. When prompted, the tRNA synthetase charges a tRNA with the bio-orthogonal amino acid, which is then used by ribosomes to insert the tag into proteins made in the cell.The study appears in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Synthetic Biology.Rice scientists have discovered a method to tag proteins with a controllable enzyme switch. When prompted, fragments of a tRNA synthetase come together and charge a tRNA with a bio-orthogonal amino acid (N3), which is inserted as a recognizable tag into all subsequent proteins made in the cell. Courtesy of the Silberg Research GroupThese bio-orthogonal tags give researchers a snapshot of total protein synthesis in the cell. “Instead of physically separating a cell from a mixture to find the proteins being made, we can use this engineered switch to put what amounts to a fishhook on every protein in a specific cell,” Silberg said. “This approach will allow us to increase spatial and temporal control over the tagging of proteins synthesized in a given cell.”Since many proteins appear and disappear during the development of an organism or the spread of a disease, the technique could be helpful to identify cellular changes that underlie disease. Thomas characterized her technique as a “protein spy.”“It spies on what proteins are being made inside the cell,” she said. “Current technologies just spy on everything, but I want to be more specific. I want more control over when I turn my spy on or off, so I can track only the cells I’m interested in.”The researchers used an azidonorleucine (Anl) amino acid to tag proteins in Escherichia coli bacteria cells. Thomas’ engineered switch is controlled like a computer program’s AND gate. The switch only charges tRNA with Anl efficiently when the switch is synthesized and a chemical is present in the cell to flip the switch.Rice University synthetic biologist Jonathan Silberg and graduate student Emily Thomas. Photo by Jeff FitlowSilberg said the technique will provide new control over protein transcription and tagging to researchers. “In human biology, a lot of the control comes at the DNA level, but over the past 20 years it’s become apparent that a lot of control comes at the protein level as well,” he said. “We have fewer genes in our genome than people originally expected because there’s this other layer of complexity in the proteome, the collection of proteins expressed by the genome.“Proteins are the business side of the cell,” he said. “They provide structure and do a lot of the signaling within a cell. They give rise to a lot of the complexity we observe. In the future, our technique could help people understand the details of a disease by providing snapshots of proteins synthesized in specific cells at different times during development and allowing comparisons of healthy and diseased cells.“The prospect of doing this in humans is the genetic technology equivalent of going to Mars right now,” Silberg said. “It’s far out.”Co-authors of the paper are Rice alumnus Naresh Pandey, graduate student Sarah Knudsen and Zachary Ball, an associate professor of chemistry. Silberg is an associate professor of biosciences.The research was supported by the National Science Foundation, the Robert A. Welch Foundation, the John S. Dunn Collaborative Research Award, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Keck Center of the Gulf Coast Consortia, the Houston Area Molecular Biophysics Program and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences.-30-Read the abstract at http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acssynbio.7b00100Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNewsRelated materials:The Silberg Research Group: www.bioc.rice.edu/~joff/Wiess School of Natural Sciences: http://natsci.rice.eduImages for download: http://news.rice.edu/files/2017/04/0501_PROTEIN-1-WEB-1gbzzvp.jpgRice University scientists have discovered a method to tag proteins with a controllable enzyme switch. When prompted, fragments of a tRNA synthetase come together and charge a tRNA with a bio-orthogonal amino acid (N3), which is inserted as a recognizable tag into all subsequent proteins made in the cell. (Credit: The Silberg Research Group/Rice University) http://news.rice.edu/files/2017/04/0501_PROTEIN-2-WEB-1dor0do.jpgRice University synthetic biologist Jonathan Silberg and graduate student Emily Thomas in the lab. They led the discovery of a method to rapidly trigger the universal tagging of proteins being produced by a cell. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) AddThislast_img read more

Read More »