Arteta demands more as Maitland-Niles earns England call-up

first_imgArsenal boss, Mikel Arteta, has challenged Ainsley Maitland-Niles to produce his best form more consistently after he celebrated his 23rd birthday with a Community Shield triumph and a maiden England call-up. Maitland-Niles was named man of the match as the Gunners drew 1-1 with Premier League champions Liverpool at Wembley before prevailing 5-4 on penalties.Advertisement read also:Arteta predicts ‘many more’ COVID-19 cases in Premier League As he did during the respective FA Cup semi-final and final wins over Manchester City and Chelsea, Arteta selected Maitland-Niles at left wing-back. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… center_img Promoted ContentBest Car Manufacturers In The World8 Scenes That Prove TV Has Gone Too FarWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksWho Earns More Than Ronaldo?The Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way13 kids at weddings who just don’t give a hootBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Them10 Risky Jobs Some Women DoTop 10 Most Romantic Nations In The WorldLook At Something Beautiful That Wasn’t Made By A Human Beinglast_img read more

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Evolutionists Need to Mind Their Matters

first_imgTo a Darwinian evolutionist, the mind is the product of unguided mutations and random environmental pressures acting on material forces.  This raises questions about the mind and morals: do they have any validity?  Evolutionists need to “mind” their matter.  The following examples show how they try to justify these non-material entities arising from matter in motion.The smart thing:  Intelligence is an immaterial property that, to an evolutionist, must be an epiphenomenon or illusion arising from particles in motion.  New Scientist asked whether intelligence – “what distinguishes humans from the myriad other species with which we share our planet” – can be explained in evolutionary terms.  The article is more a question than an answer about intelligence:It is a key factor in everything from our anatomy to our technology. To ask why we are intelligent is to ask why we are human; it admits no discrete answer. But let’s ask it here anyway. Why are we, alone in nature, so smart?One answer is that maybe we aren’t as smart as we think we are.  “Maybe our anthropocentric conceit prevents us from fully appreciating the intelligence of other animals, be they ants, cephalopods or cetaceans.”  This approach however, invokes one immaterial concept, conceit, to dodge another, intelligence.  It seems the article is marching in place so far.  Time for another tentative step:So let’s rephrase the question. There is a cluster of abilities that seems unique to humans: language, tool use, culture and empathy. Other animals may have rudimentary forms of these abilities, but they do not approach humans’ sophistication and flexibility. Why not?Again, though, language, tool use, culture and empathy are immaterial, so this approach suffers the same shortcomings.  Appeals to variations of intelligence within species doesn’t solve the problem.  At this point, the anonymous author of this article leapt into storybook land about why not all chimps became champs of intelligence:Some did, but a long time ago: our own ancestors. Somewhere in our evolutionary history, there were presumably similarly prodigious protohumans, produced by some accident of genetics or environment, whose greater intelligence gave them the edge over their less gifted peers. Today’s chimp prodigies do not seem to profit from their intelligence in the same way. Their society and environment do not reward it as ours did.So our ancestors may have been fortuitously placed to embark on the runaway cycle of biological and cultural development that led to modern, multitasking humans… and to a level of adaptability that allows us to adjust readily to changes in our environment, and even modify it to suit ourselves.To avoid belaboring the point that words like history, prodigy, gifted, reward, and suit refer to immaterial concepts and values, this answer reduces to “stuff happens” – we got smart “fortuitously,” by “some accident of genetics or environment.”  If intelligence is an accident, though, philosophers will want to know what gives it validity to be turned on itself to ask questions about its own origin.The right thing:  Kate Douglas tried to evolutionize morality with a book review for New Scientist entitled, “When did our ancestors learn to do the right thing?” but whether she did the right thing evolutionarily is the question at issue.  The book under review is Christopher Boehm’s Moral Origins: The evolution of virtue, altruism, and shame.  A social anthropologist, Boehm studied the !Kung people of the Kalahari Desert in South Africa for answers.  He believes the !Kung mimic “the original moralists – late Pleistocene foraging societies living in Africa 45,000 years ago.”  Here’s his thesis in a nutshell:So how did we evolve from amoral apes to moral humans? It is a question that has perplexed many, from Darwin onward, but what sets Boehm’s approach apart is his effort “to make the natural history of moral origins more historical“. In so doing he provides a new and coherent map of the evolution of morality.He argues that our ancestors were “preadapted” for morality. Like today’s chimps and bonobos, they had a sense of self and of fairness, a tendency for young to learn appropriate behaviour from their mothers, and the potential for collective action, giving subordinates some power over dominant individuals.The first step was to develop a conscience, or what Boehm describes as a “Machiavellian risk calculator”. At first, this controlled selfish urges through fear of punishment, but morality began to emerge when our ancestors learned to internalise their society’s social rules, connecting them with emotions such as shame and honour. Finally, he says, altruistic genes got a boost as societies came to value generosity and punish selfishness. Our egotistic and nepotistic tendencies still far outweigh the altruistic ones, but by social selection we have unwittingly made our own gene pool more virtuous.It’s hard to see how Boehm can justify using words like self, fairness, rules, values, shame, honour, altruistic, and virtuous in a materialistic context.  Some of these things he seems to think were just “there,” being somehow “preadapted.”  His law of “social selection” seems contrived out of Darwin’s natural selection.  Another problem is that Boehm studied modern, living humans who already are “egalitarian and share big game equitably,” begging the question on how such immaterial traits got started.  Kate Douglas tried to be as nice as she could: “It is a complex story and Moral Origins is a bit muddled at times, but Boehm’s experience doing fieldwork with humans and wild chimps makes him a wonderfully knowledgeable guide. And some of his ideas are truly revolutionary.”In short, somewhere, in an unobserved evolutionary history, presumably, an accident of genetics or environment did something, perhaps developing a conscience, that internalized rules, generating “altruistic genes” that in turn produced true altruism, leading chimps down a path that led to us humans with our intelligence, virtue and morality.  To call evolutionary answers “a bit muddled at times” is being truly altruistic.  That, in and of itself, is evidence that altruism and intelligence are not products of material processes of selection and “fortuitous” accident, but of design.  It follows logically that it is neither virtuous nor sensible to think otherwise. (Visited 30 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Nincha Lets You Share What Others Won’t

first_imgA Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… dana oshiro Tags:#start#startups Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Get your mind out of the gutter. This isn’t about distributing your crude weekend photography, it’s about being able to upload content outside the parameters of basic community categories. While we all know that YouTube is for video, Flickr is for photography and LinkedIn is for career-related content, it’s hard to tell where we should be sharing our important but uncategorizable content. Nincha is a stealthy little community that just may infiltrate the community sharing space. Like many other social sites, Nincha lets you upload photos, create polls, share bookmarks and review products. However, some additional types of content include job and classified listings, code snippets, recipes, events and business cards. Rather than offering a basic light blogging tool, users are encouraged to comment on each others’ submissions and favorite the community’s best content. From here you can follow others and share your uploads via email, Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, StumbleUpon, Delicious, Digg and text message. While it’s too early to say which types of content will dictate the tone of this community, its obvious there are advantages to this type of social sharing. Rather then just adding your code to GitHub or your own website, you can share snippets of code to your favorite social profiles with a better chance of recruiting new programmers and contributors. Additionally, the text message feature means that you can avoid sometimes finicky services like the Bump iPhone app and send your business card directly to an iPhone users’ contact book. And finally, if you know your pecan pie recipe is going to be a Thanksgiving hit, you might as well tweet it out now and save yourself the trouble of forwarding it to others. Nincha is offering us the chance to share the content and links we need without confining us to specific file formats. The first 1000 lucky ReadWriteWeb readers can try the service at http://nincha.com/signup/readwriteweb_8xqg1b. Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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Open Thread: There’s No Such Thing As Free Content

first_imgA Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Tags:#Open Thread#web So why do users keep expecting to consume it, reuse it, share it and store it without paying for it?Let me explain: Someone, somewhere ends up putting out money for everything you do online, every piece of news you read, every Web app you use. It takes professionals and hardware across a gigantic industry to make these things work. In terms of overhead alone, content costs a lot. So why do some users always kick and scream at the first suggestion of paid content? Do you think content is worth paying for, and if so, what are you personally willing to pay?This trend has been a common one in our virtual newsroom lately. Whether we’re praising the latest startup that’s had the sense to launch with a freemium model or wondering how old-media models (see News Corp. and the New York Times) are dealing with new media revenue possibilities, the subject of who pays for content and how is a hot one.As a journalist who came of age career-wise during the print era, and as a musician who first recorded songs on these things called “tapes,” I understand the cultural value of great content, and I admire the men and women who make it. I also love being able to support the creators and publications that bring me the content I love.On the other hand, as a typical NMD and one who lives almost entirely online, I have done my share of content scalping, whether it’s lifting a copyrighted photo for a design project, illegally downloading a single or two from a multiplatinum artist, or diving deep into the world of torrents where all the films are gloriously free and inconveniently subtitled in Hungarian. Like any petty thief, I tried to justify my actions to myself by saying that I’m only taking from those who can afford it. But let us speak frankly: The creative and publishing industries are all at a crisis point because of hundreds of millions of people like me who say the exact same thing. I’ve lately started to come to grips with my hypocrisy and started paying for content, whether that’s a legitimate iTunes purchase or a Netflix subscription. I tell you, it feels like I’m giving money to a feed-the-children charity when I’m really just paying for something that should have never been free in the first place.Today, YouTube has announced its plan to help indie filmmakers (and increase its own revenues) by asking users for a $5 fee to watch a selection of Sundance Film Festival movies. I’m wondering how many users will balk at the fee, and what will go through their heads when they do so.Will they be thinking about the months or years each filmmaker spent creating the movie? Or the time the actors spent preparing for and performing their roles? Will they think about filming equipment rentals? Will they consider the cost of hosting online videos at a scale that accommodates huge volumes of traffic around the globe and around the clock? Will they think about the developers who work tirelessly to make the magic of online video possible?Or will they simply knee-jerk and proclaim a loud “How dare they!” at the thought of paid content?(As a side note, I’m also curious to see a Venn diagram showing the overlap of people who object to paying for online content while vigorously complaining about “distracting” online advertising.)So, what’s the difference between the analog days, when creators charged for their creations and theft was theft, and these digital times, when anything that’s been transformed into ones and zeroes is fair game for free consumption, piracy, remixing and redistribution?I’m curious: What kinds of online content, if any, are you willing to pay for? And how much will you pay for them?Would you pay for news? Special, in-depth reports? Entertainment and multimedia? How about a blog subscription? Let me know your thoughts in the comments.Photo credit: SFDenverLV.] Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…center_img 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market jolie odell Related Posts last_img read more

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10 months agoMan Utd chiefs believe Mourinho an obstacle to securing stars to new deals

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorChris BeattieShare the loveHave your say Man Utd chiefs believe Mourinho an obstacle to securing stars to new dealsby Chris Beattie10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United chiefs believe new contract talks with players are being held up by the presence of manager Jose Mourinho, it has been claimed.The Daily Mail says the players were given the day off after Sunday’s defeat at Liverpool, but have spoken for some time about it being a matter of when, and not if, Mourinho is sacked.The mood at the club is said to be desperate and he has almost no support left in the dressing-room.It emerged on Monday that United have triggered the 12-month extension on Anthony Martial’s contract – as they did with David de Gea last month – and are conscious that negotiations with both players over a new deal would be easier if Mourinho is no longer in charge. last_img read more

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Photos: Alabama Players Are Very Jealous Of Nick Saban’s New Car, Which Is Awesome

first_imgHead coach Nick Saban of the Alabama Crimson Tide celebrates with the trophy after defeating the Notre Dame Fighting Irish in the 2013 Discover BCS National Championship game.MIAMI GARDENS, FL – JANUARY 07: Head coach Nick Saban of the Alabama Crimson Tide celebrates with the trophy after defeating the Notre Dame Fighting Irish in the 2013 Discover BCS National Championship game at Sun Life Stadium on January 7, 2013 in Miami Gardens, Florida. Alabama won the game by a score of 42-14. (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)Nick Saban has a new car. It’s a shiny Mercedes-Benz and, yes, it is awesome. The Alabama head coach apparently drove it to the Crimson Tide’s football facility today. And, unsurprisingly, Saban’s players were very impressed by it. I just want yall to understand how Saban kilt the game today….. Smh boy boy boy pic.twitter.com/xBH7aJ9uap— Alphonse Taylor (@SHANKK50) June 10, 2015pic.twitter.com/gq4Bu3U87i— Juice (@D_4Charlot) June 11, 2015When I saw Saban’s new whip, I thought he was James Bond or some B lol— Khi (@MekhiBrownFFF) June 10, 2015Saban’s car bruh!! pic.twitter.com/AtDADg1j9L— Brandon (@SabanNation_15) June 10, 2015It’s good to be the head coach of the University of Alabama’s football program. It’s very, very good. [BamaOnLine]last_img read more

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Sports Stars Get On Their Bikes For Princes Trust

first_imgSporting stars Martin Johnson, Dion Dublin, Austin Healey, Leon Lloyd, Martin Corry and Neil Back joined hundreds of cyclists for The Prince’s Trust Palace to Palace bike ride, supported by Allianz, in the West Midlands last week.Participants set off from Warwick Castle, and cycled through the beautiful old villages of the Warwickshire countryside and alongside Kenilworth Castle.After 45 miles the cyclists crossed the finish line onto the Pageant Field at Warwick Castle where they were met by cheering supporters.Additionally, the BikeYard and Royal Leamington Spa Cycling Club were on hand to provide a “bike doctor” service for those that needed it.This is the second time Palace to Palace has taken place in the West Midlands. All the money raised helps support the youth charity’s work with disadvantaged young people across the region.Former-England Rugby captain, Martin Johnson, who took part said: “I’ve had a brilliant time at Palace to Palace – the atmosphere throughout has been fantastic.“The Prince’s Trust is an amazing charity that has helped many young people to turn their lives around and I’m proud to have been able to support them by getting on my bike today.”Former Aston Villa and England footballer and Prince’s Trust ambassador, Dion Dublin, said: “I have been looking forward to Palace to Palace for ages because I know – from riding last year – just how much fun it is. All the money raised today will make a world of difference to the most vulnerable young people here in the West Midlands.”Chris Hanks from Allianz Insurance, sponsor of the event said: “We were delighted to be sponsoring the Palace to Palace Bike Ride for a second year with over 30 people in the Allianz team.“Allianz Commercial is proud to support the event and the Prince’s Trust to help them continue their work with vulnerable young people.”The Prince’s Trust has helped more than 700,000 young people since 1976 and supports 100 more each day. The Trust needs to raise a million pounds a week to ensure its vital work can continue. Last year, three in four young people supported by the Prince’s Trust moved into work, training or education.For more information, or to sign up for the next Palace to Palace event, visit www.princes-trust.org.uk/palace.Source:Prince’s Trustlast_img read more

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