Small farmer workshop

first_imgA workshop for small-scale farmers and home gardeners interested in growing and marketing vegetables for profit is set for Sept. 20 on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin. Taught by UGA Cooperative Extension vegetable horticulturist Bob Westerfield, the class will cover the basics of how to begin earning extra income by growing and selling vegetables. Workshop topics will include which vegetables to grow, how to grow them, using plastic mulch and high tunnels, understanding soils, equipment selection and pest identification and control. The workshop is designed for beginning growers or homeowners who would like to sell their produce at a farmers market, at a roadside stand or to individuals. The program will be held from 9 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. at the UGA Research and Education Garden off Ellis Road in Griffin. The cost of the workshop is $39, which includes all materials, lunch and break refreshments. For more information or to register, call Beth Horne at (770) 228-7214 or email her at [email protected]last_img read more

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Vermont Business Roundtable expects continued slow growth

first_imgThe chief executives of Vermont’s leading businesses appear poised to maintain their growth plans through early 2012, echoing results from the previous survey.  The survey was completed between September 8 and September 22 and released today by Vermont Business Roundtable Chair Steve Voigt, CEO, King Arthur Flour and President Lisa Ventriss.According to Roundtable President, Lisa Ventriss, ‘When viewed in the aggregate, these results point to an economy that is expecting to grow, albeit very slowly.  The effects of Tropical Storm Irene and the potential threat of a ‘double dip’ recession are, naturally, causes of great concern to our members. The good news is that 95 percent of CEO respondents expect to see their sales volumes increase or stay the same in the coming six months, which is consistent with the previous survey, and good news for Vermont products and services. Also encouraging news is that 90 percent of CEOs expect to maintain or grow in the size of their workforce through the fall and winter, again consistent with the previous survey results.Chair Steve Voigt said ‘Roundtable members are reflecting the reality that we live in strained economic times. Companies have worked very hard to control costs and pump money back into their businesses, which is why we are now seeing almost 60 percent of members with no future changes in capital spending. Those dollars have been invested already. Now, if they plan to grow, they will do it through investing in their workforces.’The Roundtable’s CEO Economic Outlook Survey provides a forward-looking view of the economic assumptions and attitudes of chief executive officers of 118 of the state’s top employers with an aggregate economic impact of $292 billion, with over $1.8 billion in corporate philanthropy, and employing more than 10 percent of the state’s workforce.  The members represent Vermont’s agriculture, construction, education, health services, finance, real estate, insurance, hospitality/leisure, manufacturing, information, utilities, professional/business services, wholesale trade, and non-profit industries. The response rate for this quarter was 52 percent.  Historically, rates have varied from 35 to 73 percent. 1. How do you expect your company’s sales to change in the next six months? SalesINCREASENO CHANGEDECREASEQ1 200483%13%4%Q2 200480%15%4%Q3 200471%25%4%Q4 200477%22%1%Q1 200578%19%3%Q2 200575%23%2%Q3 200574%24%2%Q4 200572%24%4%Q1 200678%20%2%Q2 200678%22%0%Q3 200669%25%6%Q4 200673%23%4%Q3 200851%35%14%Q4 200827%46%27%Q1 200933%30%37%Q2 200941%31%28%Q3 200934%49%17%Q1 201063%19%18%Q2 201069%24%7%Q3 201059%35%6%Q4 201071%23%6%Q1 201173%19%8%Q2 201161%34%5%Q3 201162%335Point change from Q2 to Q31-10Totals may not equal 100 due to rounding. 3. How do you expect your company’s employment to change in the next six months? 2. How do you expect your company’s capital spending to change in the next six months? VBR 9.29.2011… CapitalINCREASENO CHANGEDECREASEQ1 200462%30%8%Q2 200443%41%15%Q3 200451%42%7%Q4 200445%46%9%Q1 200555%37%8%Q2 200549%43%8%Q3 200557%38%5%Q4 200550%35%15%Q1 200645%45%10%Q2 200653%40%7%Q3 200640%50%10%Q4 200656%39%5%Q3 200838%42%20%Q4 200817 %43%40%Q1 200912%38%50%Q2 200917%51%32%Q3 200931%46%23%Q1 201050%42%8%Q2 201051%38%11%Q3 201037%48%15%Q4 201049%34%17%Q1 201147%38%15%Q2 201146%44%10%Q3 201139%583%Point change from Q2 to Q3-714-7Totals may not equal 100 due to rounding. EmploymentINCREASENO CHANGEDECREASEQ1 200457%38%4%Q2 200450%48%2%Q3 200459%37%4%Q4 200458%39%3%Q1 200555%38%7%Q2 200549%42%9%Q3 200549%44%7%Q4 200560%35%5%Q1 200654%39%7%Q2 200650%45%5%Q3 200643%49%7%Q4 200653%41%5%Q3 200840%42%18%Q4 200825%35%40%Q1 200923%37%40%Q2 200921%50%29%Q3 200934%46%20%Q1 201040%52%8%Q2 201046%45%9%Q3 201035%52%13%Q4 201051%38%11%Q1 201144%41%last_img read more

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These investments require pre-purchase analysis

first_imgDue diligence is a good idea before any credit union purchase. But the National Credit Union Administration actually requires a formal pre-purchase analysis before you buy investments to fund your employee and executive benefits plans. How is this best done? In Episode 61 of the CUES Podcast, Greg Smyth gives insights and guidance.An executive benefits specialist with CUESolutions platinum provider CUNA Mutual Group, Madison, Wis., Smyth notes that benefits expenses have been consistently and dramatically increasing year over year, especially health insurance benefits. While benefits expenses may be increasing 4 percent to 5 percent a year, according to Smyth, investment yields for credit unions have been growing much more slowly, in the range of 2 to 3 percent annually. NCUA recognized this imbalance and created a way for credit unions to mitigate it by making certain investments to help fund their benefits plans that were previously considered “impermissible.”“This expanded investment offering allows credit unions to seek potentially higher yielding investments” outside of section 703, he says. “And that extra income can go towards employee benefits expenses” and support offering really good benefits plans to staff. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Endwell church hosts drive-thru chicken barbecue

first_imgIn each dinner plate, customers receive chicken, baked beans, coleslaw, a roll and a few soft potatoes. Jerry Kettle, coordinator, says the drive-thru was an alternative to the annual bazaar the church holds during the summer. ENDWELL (WBNG) — The Church of the Holy Family held a drive-thru chicken dinner barbecue fundraiser. This is the church’s second drive-thru barbecue. The fundraiser was raising money for activities the church takes part in within the community. center_img “It was a way for us to reach out to the community and provide the chicken dinners to the community without having to gather a bunch of people underneath a tent,” Kettle said. The church says they have plans to hold another drive-thru barbecue sometime early next year.last_img

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