Guinea worm closer to eradication as cases halve in a year

first_imgDAKAR, Senegal (AP) — A new report says just over two dozen people in the world are infected with Guinea worm, and community programs are close to eradicating the disease in which a meter-long worm slowly emerges from a blister in a person’s skin. The U.S.-based Carter Center, which leads the eradication campaign, says just 27 cases were reported in 2020 in six countries in sub-Saharan Africa, or half the number of cases in 2019. Guinea worm is poised to be the second human disease to be eradicated after smallpox.last_img

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US Provides 200 More Ventilators to Brazil to Respond to COVID-19

first_imgBy U.S. Embassy in Brazil August 10, 2020 The U.S. government, through the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), donated on July 29, a second shipment of 200 brand new, state-of-the-art ventilators to Brazil to assist its fight against COVID-19.The ventilators, produced in the United States, reflect leading-edge and in-demand technology. They are compact, deployable, and provide Brazil with flexibility in treating patients affected by the virus. For patients whose lungs are not working adequately despite receiving oxygen, this vital resource may prove lifesaving.U.S. Ambassador to Brazil, Todd C. Chapman, highlighted the initiative: “We continue to deliver on the agenda President Trump set to strengthen our relationship with Brazil. With now this second shipment of 200 ventilators, we are delivering on the promise by President Trump. These ventilators are intended to assist those Brazilians who need them most.”USAID is funding a tailored package of additional support, which includes service and warranty, as well as accessories such as monitoring equipment, tubes, and filters. This donation builds on the more than $15 million that the U.S. government has committed to Brazil in response to the pandemic, and approximately $55 million from U.S. companies in Brazil.Other U.S. government-funded efforts include emergency activities in health, water, sanitation, and hygiene; immediate support to vulnerable communities in the Amazon, including risk-communications and community engagement; the prevention and control of infections in health facilities, water and sanitation, and disease-surveillance and rapid response; support for refugees and host communities as they deal with the pandemic; and incentives to the private sector to address the non-health impacts of the disease on rural and vulnerable urban populations.On July 21, the U.S. government, though the Department of Defense, announced it will donate a field hospital in Bacanal, a city 240 kilometers from São Luís, Maranhão state, which will have 40 beds, stretchers, air conditioners, cleaning supplies, and power generators. In addition to the hospital structure and supplies, the U.S. will donate $50,000 in kits with personal hygiene products and $50,000 in foods baskets to the state of Maranhão.For decades, the United States has been the world’s largest provider of bilateral assistance in health. Since 2009, American taxpayers have generously funded more than $100 billion in health assistance and nearly $70 billion in humanitarian assistance.last_img read more

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County judges work to coordinate education efforts

first_imgCounty judges work to coordinate education effortsAmy K. Brown Assistant Editor Increasing public trust and confidence in the courts has long been a focus of the judiciary, and now the Conference of County Court Judges of Florida is taking steps to coordinate the public education efforts of county judges throughout the state. At a March 8 meeting of the Conference, representatives from each of the state’s 20 circuits met as part of the Public Education of the Court Teams (PECTs) project. PECT representatives discussed what county court judges in their respective circuits are doing in terms of public outreach and education. The meeting allowed county judges in each circuit to exchange ideas and information in order to encourage active participation by all county judges. The campaign to educate the public about the role of the courts is one of the judges’ most important functions, according to co-chairs Miami-Dade County Judge Beth Bloom and Pinellas County Judge Patrick Caddell. “The county judges have had a long-standing tradition of reaching out to educate the community,” said Bloom. “The purpose of PECT is to share ideas, resources and creativity so that we can continue to reach out to the community to educate them about the court system, the independence of the judiciary, and the workings of the courts.” “We have been reaching out to educate the community for some time now, and this is an opportunity to place under one umbrella all the programs county judges have been doing with other groups,” she said. Second Circuit: Judge Augustus Aikens said the circuit currently has two components to its PECT program: school/civic speakers and communications. Judges in the circuit provide instruction to schoolchildren and civic organizations on the basic concepts and values of the legal system, and the PECT has taken steps to provide wider distribution of the circuit’s newsletter to schools and civic organizations. Third Circuit: One of the most unusual initiatives in the circuit is the Citizens’ Police Academy in Suwannee County, reported Judge William Slaughter II. He also hosts a live radio show broadcast once a month from his chambers. “I’ve discovered the public has a real thirst for knowledge about the court system,” he noted. The circuit, like the other reporting circuits, schedules judges to speak at schools and civic organizations. In addition, the circuit runs a teen court, a twice per year family law lecture at a local high school, and the Suwannee County Courthouse hosts classes of fourth and fifth grade students each year. Fourth Circuit: Judge Pauline Drayton-Harris reported that although the PECT program isn’t formally initiated in Duval County yet, the judges actively participate in public education through speaking engagements. The program proposal was “well-received and the judges were excited about it,” she commented. Sixth Circuit: The circuit has aid from the well-established local bar associations, making media and public relations much easier, said Judge Robert Morris. The courts are very active with the Law Day and Great American Teach-In programs, sending judges to area schools during the events to speak about the judiciary. Each school in Pinellas County has a volunteer coordinator, according to Morris, who regularly calls on the judges for assistance. In addition, a local law firm has its own public access television show that involves the judges as guests. Plans are also in the works to provide joint presentations with area legislators to discuss the relationship between the judiciary and the legislature. As several other circuit representatives noted, Morris expressed a reticence to get involved with the media in his circuit, noting “it’s like shoving your head in the mouth of a lion.” Eighth Circuit: Judge Phyllis Kotey has received direct help from the Court Administrator’s Public Information Officer and local bar associations in organizing speaking engagements for area judges. The courts regularly host fifth grade students for mock trials, which has become a tradition in the circuit, as well as running a teen court for older students. Kotey also hosts a television show in conjunction with PBS and the University of Florida called “Law Matters,” which features judges, lawyers, and litigants discussing current cases and issues. One of the most successful public outreach initiatives in the circuit is the production of videos to show to pro se litigants before trials. The videos, covering topics such as small claims and divorce, are available to schools and legal professionals throughout the state. Ninth Circuit: As in the eighth circuit, the ninth circuit PECT program has help from the Court Administrator’s Public Information Officer, who sends out news releases and deals directly with the media, noted Judge C. Jeffery Arnold, which “makes the media people more comfortable.” Ninth Circuit judges regularly speak to Girl Scout and Cub Scout troops and at schools for Law Day, and Arnold said that their focus is “primarily at the elementary school level.” The court also has two open forum programs that are videotaped and regularly appear on the local PBS television station. The programs discuss what’s going on in the courthouse and popular issues such as jury service, collection court, and the guardian ad litem program. They were established about a year and a half ago. Contrary to what many other circuit representatives said, certain judges in the ninth circuit have welcomed the media into their courtrooms. One judge holds an “adoption day” in which the judge presides over several adoptions and encourages members of print and TV media to cover the event. Another judge invites a media representative to sit on the bench with him while he sentences felons, to give the public a better understanding of the process. Tenth Circuit: Judge Olin Shinholser reported that judges in his circuit have worked diligently to establish a rapport with the media during noncontroversial times, so when a controversial situation arises, members of the media are less likely to “attack” the judges. He also noted that several judges have been profiled in area newspapers. In Highlands County, where Shinholser presides, all fourth grade students come to the courthouse as part of their curriculum. Shinholser said he personally answers all of the students’ questions, either during their visit to the courthouse or afterwards by personal letter. Judges in the circuit also speak at schools and civic organizations. Eleventh Circuit: The Office of Government Liaison and Public Information has provided a full-time public information director to assist county court judges in the circuit with media relations. Judge Carroll Kelly noted that over 40 judges have volunteered for the circuit’s speakers counsel, which has sent letters to civic groups and schools offering their services. The judges also regularly participate in Law Week activities. The circuit has a plethora of plans in the works, including increasing the amount of court information available online, starting self-help centers for pro se litigants, and preparing for a “media day.” Thirteenth Circuit: Judge Walter Heinrich said that Hillsborough County utilizes its public information officer to send out press releases and handle information requests from the media. The judges themselves have assembled a cadre of informational and educational outlets, including an educational video of a day in Heinrich’s courtroom and law day speeches. Fourteenth Circuit: The clerk of court’s office is a valuable resource for judges in the circuit with regard to media contacts, said Judge Robert Brown. The clerk’s office contacts the media every time a judge has a speaking engagement. He noted that the circuit has programs in place similar to the other circuits, but Bay County is lagging in their public outreach programs. This stems from the resignation of one county judge, leaving an unusual amount of work for the remaining two judges until a replacement can be named. Fifteenth Circuit: Palm Beach County has one of the most well-established public outreach programs in the state, according to Judge Krista Marx. The courthouse boasts a fully-staffed pro se self-help center that provides “do-it-yourself” legal documents for a nominal fee. The county also holds several mock trials per year, offers a two-hour tour of the courthouse for kids which follows the entire system from arrest to the Juvenile Detention Center. The circuit has also produced a small claims video and several public service announcements. The latter is shown regularly on local television stations. Marx noted that local judges focus primarily on educating students, though keeping everyone informed is an ongoing issue. Sixteenth Circuit: Judge Ruth Becker has set up a meeting with the superintendent of schools, county mayors, the public defender’s office, and the local bar president to discuss and plan how the court can best act as a resource to the community. Becker noted that many of the programs in the circuit mirror those found in other circuits, such as Law Day activities, tours of the courthouse for fourth grade students, and a pro se self-help center. The judges also receive help from a public information officer and are looking into setting up a speakers bureau in the circuit. One unusual aspect of the circuit’s campaign is Becker’s involvement with “Take Your Daughter to Work Day.” For the past few years, she has had high school girls come and sit on the bench with her, and she has organized a luncheon for all the mentors and girls. Eighteenth Circuit: Judge David Silverman commented that the circuit has many of the same programs found in other circuits (speakers bureau, mock trials, teen court) and employs the assistance of a public information officer to handle media inquiries. The most innovative approach Silverman has taken was his idea for “court on the road” in which he held a trial at a local community college. Three television stations were present at the event. Silverman is also working with the court technology officer to put judges’ schedules online for public viewing. He noted the PECT program in his circuit is informal and still in the planning stages, but the judges are interested in becoming more involved. Twentieth Circuit: Unlike many of the other circuits, judges in the twentieth circuit have made it a point to become very active in their local bar association. County judges serve on several committees within the bar, including the Law Week Committee and the Education Committee, said Judge Edward Voltz. Local judges speak to community groups on a regular basis and participate in teen court and moot court programs. The court provides an informative website, publications on domestic violence and small claims, and tours of the courthouse for students. A program directed at seniors in high school is one of the circuit’s most widely-publicized initiatives, along with several TV spots that appear on local networks. Judge Caddell, the PECT co-chair, noted that Florida county judges take pride in their work to increase public confidence in the judiciary. “I would call the enthusiasm of the county judges remarkable were it not for the fact that remarkable enthusiasm seems to be common among county judges,” he said. “As we have undertaken the task of formally establishing the PECT model statewide, one of the most striking things I have learned is how many of our fellow county judges are already devoting thousands of hours to various community programs that fit the PECT concept.” “All of these activities help to educate the public and increase public confidence in our justice system, and that is what PECT is all about,” Caddell said. “After all, we should all always bear in mind two things: we serve the public; and knowledge is power. The more knowledge people have about our system, the more empowered they become. The more empowered people are, the more likely they are to have confidence that the justice system works for them instead of the other way around.” County judges work to coordinate education efforts April 1, 2001 Assistant Editor Regular Newslast_img read more

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Where there’s a will, there’s a way

first_img February 15, 2004 Regular News Where there’s a will, there’s a way President-elect Kelly Overstreet Johnson and Florida Medical Association President Carl Lentz recently launched a joint public service campaign to encourage Floridians to prepare living wills and to designate health care surrogates. Johnson said the lawyers’ and physicians’ groups are making statutory living will and health care surrogate forms available to their members from their respective Web sites. (www.flabar.org or www.fmaonline.org.) Members are being asked to duplicate these forms and make them available to all who visit their offices. The Bar’s Speakers Bureau also has recruited members of the Elder Law, Health Law, and Real Property, Probate and Trust Law sections to volunteer as speakers to address civic and community organizations throughout the state on living wills and other end-of-life issues. Where there’s a will, there’s a waylast_img read more

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Bill to strengthen SBA’s 7(a) loan program oversight introduced

first_imgBipartisan legislation was introduced yesterday to increase the Small Business Administration’s (SBA) oversight authority over its 7(a) loan program. Credit unions actively participate in the program, which helps credit unions mitigate loan risk and maximize small-business lending within their statutory member business loan (MBL) cap.Each credit union loan dollar backed by SBA is excluded from the credit union’s MBL cap.The bill, the Small Business 7(a) Lending Oversight and Reform Act, was introduced by Senate Small Business and Entrepreneurship Committee Chairman Jim Risch, R-Idaho, House Small Business Committee Chairman Steve Chabot, R-Ohio, and respective Ranking Members Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., and Nydia Velázquez, D-N.Y.The proposed legislation would: continue reading » 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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US funds work on drugs for plague, tularemia, anthrax

first_img Gentamicin in injectable form is a first-line drug for plague and tularemia, and it has also been used in a saline nebulized form for fighting Pseudomonas respiratory infections, especially in cystic fibrosis patients, the company said. Sep 26 PharmAthene news releasehttp://ir.pharmathene.com/phoenix.zhtml?c=191999&p=irol-newsArticle&ID=1202672&highlight PharmAthene, Inc., based in Annapolis, Md., announced last month that it had been awarded a contract worth up to $13.9 million for further development of a human monoclonal antibody called Valortim to be used as an anthrax antitoxin. The company said it is collaborating with Medarex Inc., Princeton, N.J., to develop Valortim, which is designed to target protective antigen, one of the key proteins anthrax uses to attack host cells. In initial work on the product, Medarex has demonstrated a novel mechanism of action, animal efficacy, favorable human safety and pharmacokinetic data, and development of an efficient production process, according to the company news release. Nanotherapeutics, Inc., based in Alachua, Fla., announced it had received a $20 million contract to develop NanoGENT, an inhaled form of the injectable antibiotic gentamicin, for treating pneumonic plague and tularemia. Both contracts were mentioned in an Oct 5 HHS news release about four contracts to develop countermeasures for Category A bioterrorism agents. (The other two contracts were reported previously by CIDRAP News; see Oct 3 link below.) The company said preclinical studies suggest the product may be effective for both prevention and treatment of anthrax. See also: “The latest contract from NIAID/BARDA brings the total amount of government funding allocated to Valortim to over $24 million,” PharmAthene Vice President and Medical Director Valerie Riddle, MD, said in the news release. Oct 5 HHS news releasehttp://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2007pres/10/20071005c.htmlcenter_img According to results reported at the 2006 annual meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, the antitoxin was well tolerated and was not immunogenic in a phase 1 clinical trial, PharmAthene reported. Oct 3 CIDRAP News story “Federal grants support new anthrax countermeasures” The contracts were awarded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), both part of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Working with four other companies, Nanotherapeutics expects to bring NanoGENT to clinical trials in the fourth year of its NIAID-BARDA contract, the statement said. The collaborating companies are Respirics Inc., Next Breath LLC, Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, and i3 Research. Oct 16, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – The US government recently awarded contracts totaling about $34 million to two companies for development of drugs to treat pneumonic plague, tularemia, and anthrax, three of the diseases terrorists are deemed most likely to try to exploit. In an Oct 11 announcement, Nanotherapeutics said NanoGENT is a powdered formulation of gentamicin to be used as early treatment for people exposed to plague, tularemia, and other respiratory infections. The company said inhaled drugs would be especially useful for providing postexposure prophylaxis and treatment on a large scale. Oct 11 Nanotherapeutics news release PharmAthene announced on Sep 26 that its contract to develop Valortim is worth up to $13.9 million over 2 years, with up to $10.3 million to be awarded in the first year.last_img read more

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Gold Coast records huge profit on property sales

first_imgGold CoastMore from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa18 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days agoGOLD Coast homeowners are making more than $480 million in profits with new figures confirming a booming property market.The latest CoreLogic Pain and Gain report reveals nine out of 10 property owners made a profit in the December quarter.More than 90 per cent of sales recorded a total profit of $482,076,853 while 8.2 per cent of sales recorded a $15,613,522 loss.The quarterly report tracks home sales across Australia and reveals the proportion of sales being sold at a profit versus those being sold at a loss.“With property values continuing to increase over the final quarter of 2017, albeit at a more moderate pace, the proportion of properties resold at a profit has continued to climb,” Research analyst Cameron Kusher said.last_img read more

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Sumner County Sheriff Weekly Bookings: Dec. 23 to Dec. 30, 2013

first_imgKnight, Dylan James19Mulvane, KS21st and A St Wellington, KSWPDDWS12/26/13 KRGC1 Maurer, James31Mulvane, KS500 W Bridge Mulvane KsMPDDriving under the influence12/29/13 Perrine, Dennis38Wichita, KS100 S Main South HavenSUSODriving while suspended12/27/13 Wellington PD7 KHP4 Depperschmidt, David43Quinter, KS777 Kansas Star DriveKRGCTheft12/24/14 Bookings Bickerstaff, Timothy33Wellington, KS.1600 E US 166 Geuda Springs, KsSUSOPossession of Marijuana, Possession of Paraphernalia, Transporting open container12/28/13 12/26/13 Napper, Kelsey51Sedgwick, Ks1400 N US 81 Peck KsSUSODriving while suspended12/27/13 Conrady, Grant19Wichita, KSUS 81 / Tyler RoadSUSODriving while suspended12/27/13 Mulvane2 Monday 0800  to  Monday 0800  WEEKLY   BOOKINGS 12/23/2013 thru 12/30/2013 Brown,  Zachariah28Wellington, KS.700 S G Wellington, KSWPDAgg Battery, Criminal Damage to Property, Criminal Threat12/24/13 Campbell, Aaron Kelly29Wellington, KS.1416 Michigan Wellington, KSWPDDV Battery, Interference LEO12/29/13 Pearson, Ashley N.24Wellington, KS.610 E. Hillside, Wellington KS.WPDCrimingal Damage to Property and D.V. Battery12/23/13 Oneth, Nathan31Wichita, KS777 Kansas Star DriveMPDDriving under the influence12/28/13center_img Sumner Co6 Belle Plaine0 Heard, Ernest29Wichita, KS100 Block Casino Drive, Mulvane KsKHPDriving while suspended12/28/13 Culver, Roy Navarro22Wichita, KS1210 N B Wellington, KSWPDFTA12/26/13 Suttles, Robert Andrew34Winfield, KSK-15 and TristanSUSOFTA12/24/13 Diaz-Montoya, Luis A.27Oklahoma City, OK.I-35, MP 9KHPD.W.S. and D.U.I.12/25/13 Bail Bondsman1 Littleton, Timi Dean50Billings, KS610 E Hillside Wellington, KSSUSOServing Sentence12/26/13 Sedgwick Co11 NameAgeHome TownLocation of ArrestAgencyChargesDate of Arrest Caldwell PD0 Schlegel, Seth Andrew36Wichita, KS777 Kansas Star DriveKHPDUI, Driving with out license, refused breath test, refuse test for drugs12/26/13 Dugan, Dustin42Wellington, KS.1300 N B St Wellington, KsWPDDriving while suspended12/27/13 Quackenbush, Kindra31Wichita, KS4148 S Hydraulic Wichita, KsBail bondsmanFailure to Appear12/30/13 Hay, Dylan Michael24Wellington, KS.1310 Michigan Wellington, KSWPDPossession of opiate, Interference LEO12/29/13 Vestring, Joseph19Wichita, KSI35 MP 14 Wellington KsKHPDriving under the influence, Minor in possession12/28/13last_img read more

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Sarah-Jane seals English title triumph with birdie

first_img16 May 2013 Sarah-Jane seals English title triumph with birdie Cornwall’s Sarah-Jane Boyd birdied the last hole to seal a two-shot victory in the English women’s amateur championship at Kings Norton Golf Club, Worcestershire.She beat English stroke play champion Alex Peters, who made a spirited sub-par charge over the closing holes, while Gabriella Cowley took third place.Sarah-Jane, (image © Leaderboard Photography) finished the 72-event on two over par and adds this success to the British stroke play title which she won last year. She said: “I feel so good, it’s so nice to win a second one because it proves the first wasn’t a fluke. It’s a stamp of authority.“It’s really special to me to win the English, it’s a real privilege to win it and I’m over the moon.”Sarah-Jane, 21, started the final round with a five-stroke lead, but she had to withstand the late charge of Alex Peters, who played the back nine in four-under par and, at one stage, reduced the deficit to just one.Alex birdied both the 16th and 17th and her putt on 18 came within a whisker of dropping. But, in the group behind, Sarah-Jane was playing with great determination and holing demanding putts for par when it counted, notably on the short 14th and the tricky 16th where water is a daunting feature.Her brother, Alex, caddied for her and helped to keep her focussed: “He kept saying ‘I know how determined you are, prove to me how much you want it.’“I kind of knew I always had the upper hand. I was never behind and it was a matter of keeping it together and playing the percentages.”She did exactly that on the par five 18th: “I thought I had a two-shot lead but then I discovered it was only one and that I had to make a par to win. I played it as a three-shot hole, hit my third from 130-yards to 7ft – and holed it! It was amazing.”The final day was blessed with sunshine – in marked contrast to the earlier rounds – and produced a host of sub-par scores. In the morning’s third round four players returned one-under 71: Chelsea Masters of Sussex and England international Amber Ratcliffe went on to finish joint fourth, Jo Hodge of Gloucestershire added a second 71 in the afternoon and finished 7th, while Charlotte Thompson of Essex was eighth.Alex Peters and Samantha Meese of Staffordshire also beat par with 71s in the afternoon.Leading final scoresPar 72 CSS 76 77 76 76290 Sarah Jane Boyd (Truro) 73 70 72 75292 Alex Peters (Notts Ladies) 71 77 73    71295 Gabriella Cowley (Brocket Hall) 71 73 76 75296 Samantha Meese (South Staffs) 75 76 74 71; Amber Ratcliffe (Royal Cromer) 75 77 71 73; Chelsea Masters (Highwoods, Bexhill) 75 76 71 74297 Joanne Hodge (Kendleshire)    79 76 71 71298 Charlotte Thompson (Channels) 79 76 71 72300 Samantha Fuller (Roehampton) 77 73 77 73302 Rachael Goodall (Heswall) 78 79 73 72, Gemma Clews (Delamere Forest) 77 74 76 75, Emma Tayler (Saunton) 77 69 80 76last_img read more

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