Michelle Wolf defends her White House Correspondents’ dinner jokes: ‘I wouldn’t change a single word’

first_imgTasos Katopodis/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — In her first interview since she took the podium at the White House Correspondents’ dinner this weekend, Michelle Wolf defended her scathing jokes about politicians, the media and the press secretary, saying, “I wouldn’t change a single word that I said.”Over the weekend, Wolf received both support and backlash on social media for not holding back when joking about White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, President Donald Trump and more Saturday night. Some White House correspondents demanded she apologize to Sanders, while comedians like Seth Meyers and Jimmy Kimmel said Wolf was funny and that the dinner was supposed to be a roast. In a wide-ranging interview with NPR’s “Fresh Air,” Wolf talked about her monologue.“I wouldn’t change a single word that I said,” she explained. “I’m very happy with what I said and I’m glad I stuck to my guns.”But Wolf said she wasn’t expecting this kind of backlash, either. “I’m also not disappointed there’s this level. I knew what I was doing going in. I wanted to do something different. I didn’t want to cater to the room. I wanted to cater to the outside audience and not betray my brand of comedy,” she added. “A friend of mine who helped me write, he gave me a note before I went on, which I kept with me, which was, ‘Be true to yourself. Never apologize. Burn it to the ground.’”In fact, Wolf believes when she was hired for the gig, they may have underestimated her bite because of her gender.“I think sometimes they look at a woman and they think ‘Oh, she’ll be nice,’ and if you’ve seen any of my comedy you know that I don’t – I’m not. I don’t pull punches. I’m not afraid to talk about things. And I don’t think they expected that from me,” she said.As for the calls for Wolf to apologize to Sanders for allegedly attacking her appearance, she stands by her account that she never did such a thing. “If there [are] two people that I actually made fun of their looks on Saturday it was Mitch McConnell and Chris Christie and no one is jumping to their defense,” she said. “I made fun of Mitch McConnell’s neck and I did a small jab at Chris Christie’s weight and no one is jumping to their defense.”Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Now Trending: Top Services Topics for Your Products

first_imgWant to learn more about Top Services Topics? The “Connect with Customer Service” community is now featuring a quick byte video highlighting some of the benefits of these helpful new resources. This latest video episode shares how Top Services Topics enable our customers to find relevant support content and resources faster and more efficiently.Give Us Your FeedbackEnabling our customers to gather insightful, helpful support content easily, quickly, and on demand, enables you to optimize your product experience have our most valued services content at your fingertips. We’ll be updating Top Services Topics for the products listed above on a monthly basis, and will be rolling out this feature for additional products throughout 2017.We value your feedback on this program. So if you have any comments or thoughts regarding how we might improve our Top Services Topics for your products, please comment below and let us know!Holly E. AndersonDell EMC Social SupportFollow us @DellEMCsupport In an ongoing effort to enable our customers to get easy access to the most valuable support content available, we’ve recently launched a new initiative that pulls top-rated product support content together in one place for some of our most widely-used products. Every month, Dell EMC’s Customer Service team gathers leading support topics regarding a wide variety of products and provides helpful content on the Dell EMC Community Network (DECN) to enable you to get proactive about troubleshooting common technical challenges, and more. These Top Services Topics include content pulled from popular Knowledge Base articles, DECN product support forum posts, troubleshooting guides, Online Support searches, Ask the Expert events, and more.Where Can You Find Top Services Topics?To locate trending support topics for your product, you can search the DECN (search for “Top Services Topics”), visit the Online Support product pages or simply reference the table below which reflects all Top Services Topic resources currently available by product. Click on the title of any article to open up a more detailed document for each topic. You can also download the SolVe Desktop Tool and browse for Top Service Topics for your products as well. Want to stay updated when new service topics are added for your products? Simply click “Follow” on the Top Services Topic page of your choice and you’ll be automatically updated via email notification when new topics are published monthly. You’ll also find Top Services Topics shared on Twitter @DellEMCsupport, and we encourage you to follow us there for daily tech tips, support videos, Ask the Expert events, and more.AppSyncAvamarConnectivity (Connectrix)Data DomainData Computing Appliance (DCA)Data Protection Advisor (DPA)Elastic Cloud Storage (ECS)NetWorkerPowerPathRecoverPointScaleIOSMARTSSourceOneUnityViPR ControllerViPR SRMVMAXVNX/VNXeVPLEXVxRackVxRailXtremIOlast_img read more

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Impact of Paper Products

first_imgDear EarthTalk: Are any major brands of disposable tissues, paper towels, napkins and toilet paper yet using recycled content and chlorine-free bleaching? — Sylvia Comstock, Montpelier, VTNot many. In fact, some of the biggest names in disposable paper products are the worst offenders. According to the nonprofit Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), forests at home and abroad are being destroyed to make toilet paper, facial tissues, paper towels and other disposable paper products. Giant paper producers such as Kimberly-Clark (Scott, Cottonelle, Kleenex and Viva) and Procter & Gamble (Puffs, Charmin and Bounty) are, in the words of NRDC, “forcing the destruction of our continent’s most vibrant forests, and devastating the habitat for countless wildlife species in the process.”Much of the virgin pulp used by these large manufacturers comes from Canada’s boreal forest. Some 500,000 acres of boreal forest in Ontario and Alberta alone—key habitat for caribou, lynx, wolves and scores of birds—are felled each year to provide pulp for disposable paper. Beyond wildlife concerns, Canada’s boreal forest, which stretches from coast to coast, comprises perhaps the world’s largest terrestrial storehouse of carbon dioxide, so it is critical to keep it intact to help mitigate global warming.Kimberly-Clark uses some 1.1 million cubic meters of trees from Canada’s boreal forests each year to produce 465,000 metric tons of pulp. Only 19 percent of the pulp it uses to make home use disposable paper products comes from recycled sources. Some of its brands, including Kleenex and Scott, contain no recycled content whatsoever. Nor do Procter and Gamble’s Bounty, Charmin or Puffs, says NRDC.Another issue with tissue (and paper overall) is the use of chlorine for whitening. Chlorine used in many bleaching processes contributes to the formation of dioxins and furans, chemicals that end up in our air and water and can cause cancer. Safer processes use oxygen compounds and result in paper that is “totally chlorine free,” “process chlorine free” (chlorine free except for recycled fibers that were previously chlorine-bleached) or “elemental chlorine free,” which substitutes safer chlorine dioxide for chlorine.NRDC and other groups are pressuring the tissue products industry to change its ways, and are working to educate consumers about their options when buying tissue paper products. NRDC’s online “Shopper’s Guide to Home Tissue Products” offers reams of free advice on which brands to look for—and which to avoid. Marcal is the only household name that NRDC rates high on paper sourcing (100 percent recycled and 40 to 60 percent post-consumer content) and chlorine use (process chlorine-free). Brands ranking highest (up to 80 percent post-consumer content and process-chlorine free) include 365 (the Whole Foods brand), Seventh Generation, Earth First, and Planet, among others. No brands are totally chlorine free.In general, consumers should seek out brands that specifically tout use of 100 percent recycled materials with a high percentage (40 percent or more) of post-consumer waste, and not just keywords like “green” or “eco” on their labels, which may be misleading. Also, before you even purchase that next roll of disposable paper think about how you can reduce the amount you use in the first place. Paper tissues, towels and napkins, for example, have re-usable options in handkerchiefs and cotton towels and napkins.CONTACTS: NRDC Shopper’s Guide to Home Tissue Products, www.nrdc.org/land/forests/gtissue.asp; Kimberly-Clark, www.kimberly-clark.com; Procter & Gamble, www.pg.com.GOT AN ENVIRONMENTAL QUESTION? Send it to: EarthTalk, c/o E/The Environmental Magazine, P.O. Box 5098, Westport, CT 06881; submit it at: www.emagazine.com/earthtalk/thisweek/, or e-mail: [email protected] Read past columns at: www.emagazine.com/earthtalk/archives.php.last_img read more

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Historic farms sought for rural preservation award

first_imgSpring Creek Cattle Co. Springville 2018 Arnold Award WinnerStatewide—Indiana Landmarks and Indiana Farm Bureau welcome nominations for the 2020 John Arnold Award for Rural Preservation. The award recognizes the preservation and continued use of historic farm buildings in Indiana. Since it was established in 1992, owners of 29 historic farms all over the state have been honored with the award.Anyone, including farm owners, can submit a nomination for the Arnold Award. The nomination is simple and asks for:a brief history of the farm and description of its significant historic structures and features, such as the farmhouse, barns, agricultural outbuildings, and landscape elements.a description of how the farm’s historic agricultural structures are used in day-to-day farming operations, and how they have been preserved or adapted.high-res digital photographs of the farm and its preserved historic features. Historic images are also welcome.    The award winner receives an attractive outdoor marker.Indiana Landmarks named the award in memory of John Arnold (1955-1991), a Rush County farmer who successfully combined progressive architectural practices with a deep respect for the natural and historic features of the rural landscape. The John Arnold Award for Rural Preservation honors those who share a similar commitment to preserving the landmarks and landscape of rural Indiana.last_img read more

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