Labour councillor suspended for anti-semitism to rejoin party

first_imgAn Oxford Labour councillor suspended from the Oxford Labour group after posting anti-Semitic and homophobic remarks on social media will be readmitted to the group when his suspension ends.Earlier this year, Cherwell revealed that Ben Lloyd-Shogbesan shared posts comparing Israel to Nazi Germany, praising Gaddafi, and suggesting gay marriage was a “perversion”.He also shared a post that claimed cancer was “only a deficiency of vitamin B17” and advised people to “avoid chemotherapy, surgery, or taking medicines with strong side effects”.Lloyd-Shogbesan resigned from the group and was subsequently suspended over criticism of his posts.At the time, leader of the Labour group and the council, Susan Brown, said that the material shared by Lloyd-Shogbesan was “inappropriate and offensive”.She added: “In suspending councillor Lloyd-Shogbesan from the group, we disassociate ourselves from his actions and have told him there can never be a repeat of them or any other behaviour by him which brings the party and the group into disrepute.”Other councillors criticised Labour’s decision to suspend him, one calling the move “extremely disappointing”.An investigation by the city council’s standards committee found that he had not broken the code of conduct because he made the posts prior to his councillorship.The national Labour Party reached the same conclusion as the Oxford City Council Standards Committee inquiry, agreeing to take no further action.Lloyd-Shogbesan will be readmitted to the party after 1st January, following a suspension period of three months.Lloyd-Shogbesan said: “I have never held anti-Semitic, homophobic or racist views and fully support the city council’s position on equality, diversity and inclusion.“This has been a humbling and educational experience and I remain fully committed to serving the community of Oxford to the very best of my ability.”Liberal Democrat councillor Andrew Gant said Labour had “taken the wrong course of action”, and “[Lloyd-Shogbesan’s] behaviour is incompatible with continuing as a councillor.”Oxfordshire Green Party councillor Craig Simmons said: “If this had been someone from another party they would have certainly been forced to resign – hounded out by the Labour majority.”last_img read more

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Richard Lazarus: “Environmental law has fallen ‘in arrears’”

first_img Read Full Story Environmental lawlessness was the topic of discussion on April 10, as Richard Lazarus ’79, one of the nation’s foremost experts on environmental law, gave a lecture marking his appointment to the Howard J. and Katherine W. Aibel Professorship of Law.Speaking before a crowd of family, students, colleagues, and friends—including Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts—Lazarus described how environmental law has fallen “in arrears.” After a period of legal and policy innovation that resulted in landmark statutes like the Clean Water Act and the Endangered Species Act, Congress has not passed a major new environmental statute or amendment since 1990, he said. The result of this stagnation is a growing mismatch between contemporary technology and environmental issues and outdated, inflexible statutes.“Forty years after modern environmental law’s remarkable emergence here in the United States, there is a whole lot of environmental law, but, our nation’s environmental statutes nonetheless frequently fail to  address, in any systematic way, many of the most pressing environmental problems we face. The law and our governmental institutions are again increasingly in arrears. The legal landscape is simultaneously full and empty, dominated by gaps,” said Lazarus.Read more and watch a video of the discussion on the Harvard Law School website.last_img read more

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Indian special-needs school founder speaks at Saint Mary’s

first_imgChitra Shah, the founder and director of Indian non-profit Satya Special School, spoke at the Saint Mary’s Carroll Auditorium on Monday. Satya Special School is the largest rehabilitation program for children with special needs in Pondicherry, India, servicing over 900 children.“I come from a privileged background,” Shah said. “When I say privileged background, I did what I wanted, I wore the clothes that I wanted, I studied the subject that I wanted and finally married the man that I wanted — something that a number of girls in India do not have the privilege of. Finally, when I married into a very wealthy family, I decided that I should give back something.”Shah said her mission to help her community started with a visit to a disabled girl’s home in which she witnessed abuse.“I saw this child tied up to a plastic chair with nylon ropes,” Shah said. “The mom very casually told me, ‘I leave her locked up like this eight hours a day.’ The first thought that crossed my mind was: ‘We keep dogs in a better condition.’”It wasn’t long until Shah realized this wasn’t uncommon in the area.“One of the things that this mom told me was that ‘I’m not the only one who ties up the children; I know so many other mothers who do this,’” Shah said. “So I gathered all these moms up and I asked them, ‘Would you send your children to a center if I started one?’”From there she started the school in 2003 with 20 children. Today the program has over 900 kids across nine centers in India.“There is a huge mythos attached to disabilities [in India],” Shah said. “… The belief is that they committed such a huge sin in the past that the gods have punished them with a special needs child. A child with autism is considered to be possessed by an evil spirit, so these kids are made to walk on fire and sometimes tied up to a tree and whiplashed. So whenever the family understands that they have a special needs child, the mothers are given two options: One is to walk out of the family with the child, or abandon the child.”The centers not only aid in the care and education of children with special needs, but helps build a community for the single mothers left to raise the children alone.“They started understanding that it was more scientific,” Shah said. “It was something else, it was not them. They all sat together and shared for the first time. Women in India would never go to a counselor. You would never go to somebody and share your problem.”Satya Special School has expanded since its start to include hydro, occupational, special education, group and speech therapy. They also include a school readiness program, activity-based learning, learning through visual media, learning practicality, drama as a learning tool, learning through movement and learning through play. Skill and vocational training is taught as well to the older residents. This includes teaching them paper quilting, baking, wood working, cup making and mat weaving.“We are sending out this strong message that there is so much hope,” Shah said. “Yes, you have a child who’s difficult to handle, but yet you can live your life and live it well.”Tags: disabilities, disability, India, Satya Special Schoollast_img read more

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Noah Rhynhart adds potential scoring threat to SU offense

first_img Published on August 31, 2015 at 9:06 pm Contact Chris: [email protected] | @ChrisLibonati Facebook Twitter Google+ Noah Rhynhart scored two goals in the 2011 New York state club championship for Blackwatch Midlothian. The moment serves as Charles Rhynhart’s favorite memory of watching his son play soccer, but also as an aspect of Noah’s game that he’s trying to recapture this season — his scoring touch.“He was far above his peers in (speed and finishing ability), which made him a special player,” Jeff Rockmore, an assistant coach for Rhynhart’s club team said.But in 46 games at No. 15 Syracuse (1-1), Rhynhart has converted just two shots and taken 12. A senior, Rhynhart is stepping into more playing time and an increased scoring role in his last season at SU.The departure of about one-third of Syracuse’s offense from last season has left a void that Rhynhart will have to help fill. After coming to Syracuse as a Top 150 recruit in the ESPN Rise rankings, he’s started two games in parts of four seasons.“Hopefully I can show (that I’ve improved my finishing) this year because, for a forward, I don’t have as many goals as I’d like in my career,” Rhynhart said.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textRhynhart’s transition to the college game flipped his role. In high school, his teammates pushed the ball to him to score, Roslyn Jefferson, Rhynhart’s mother said. At Syracuse, he pushes the ball to teammates and has come off the bench.The transition wasn’t a simple one. Rhynhart enrolled at Syracuse early in the 2012 spring semester, but a misdiagnosed broken leg sidelined him, Charles Rhynhart said. Rhynhart missed practices, having to sit and watch his teammates play while he did core exercises on the sideline, but his mother doesn’t think the injury set her son back in his development.After missing time in his freshman season, Rhynhart sat behind newer players like Chris Nanco and Emil Ekblom in his sophomore and junior seasons. Ekblom led SU in scoring and started every game in 2013, while Rhynhart played just 13 of 21 games.“(Ekblom’s) a tough guy to try to knock out of the lineup,” Charles Rhynhart said.Approaching this season with Syracuse, Rhynhart knows this is his last chance. When he’s gone home during the summer, he’s worked with local club teams that have college-caliber coaches and players, Rockmore said. Rhynhart has worked on his ball-striking ability, including the angle he approaches the ball when he shoots, according to Rockmore.Rhynhart also said he’s learned to get shots off quicker, gaining confidence and shedding timidity that plagued him earlier in his career.  He was named team MVP after the spring season, his father said.“I’m seeing the team put the ball up to him more readily and kind of more trusting relationship,” Charles Rhynhart said.Adding finishing ability to his speed makes him a potentially dangerous pairing with Nanco, SU head coach Ian McIntyre said. Rhynhart said when the two are on the field, their speed can help stretch the defense.Rhynhart’s father describes his son’s playing style as passing the ball to teammates and making off-ball runs instead of dribbling through the defense, which can help him play off of Nanco and vice versa.Despite Rhynhart’s improvements, he is goalless in three exhibitions and two regular season games this season, and he knows his role could be diminished if he can’t produce.“At the end of the day,” Rhynhart said, “for the forwards, it’s whoever’s scoring the goals is going to play.” Commentslast_img read more

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Mason City man pleads not guilty to sexual abuse

first_imgA Mason City man arrested late last month on sexual abuse charges has pleaded not guilty.40-year-old Bryan Holmes was charged with three counts of third-degree sexual abuse. Mason City police say they had received an earlier report that Holmes was having sexual contact with an underage person over the course of several months. Police say Holmes and the victim were acquainted and that the incident occurred at a home in Mason City. Holmes was also wanted for a warrant for violating parole.The arraignment hearing for Holmes was scheduled for next week, but online court records show he filed a written plea of not guilty on Thursday in Cerro Gordo County District Court. No trial date has been set.He’s is being held in the Cerro Gordo County Jail on $30,000 bond.last_img

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