Potential buyers were transfixed by this mega-mansion that even has its own putting green

first_img106-110 Virginia Ave, HawthorneIt has two swimming pools a tennis court, putting green and a jetty.The home was built in 2014. The front entrance has marble columns and double height ceilings. 43 Lytham St, Indooroopilly. Picture: realestate.com.auAll of the bedrooms have leafy views and direct access to the rear decks. There are double height atrium ceilings, floor to ceiling windows and natural timber finishes throughout.More from newsNew apartments released at idyllic retirement community Samford Grove Presented by Parks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus21 hours ago 43 Lytham St, Indooroopilly. Picture: realestate.com.auIt is listed for sale through Craig Sharp and Anthony Pasmore of Ray White Metro West.The third most viewed property this week, has appeared on the list for multiple weeks and has just sold for a record price. RECORD SALE IN JUST TWO HOURS The “ultimate beach house” at 21-23 Webb Rd, Sunshine Beach, was bought this week after a single offer from a buyer who “fell in the love” with the property during a two-hour inspection. 106-110 Virginia Avenue, HawthorneThe open plan living and dining area has views of the Brisbane River and there is a gas fireplace. There is also a home office and on the upper level a gallery overlooks the entrance void.It is listed for sale by tender closing March 16 through David and Garry Price of Ray White – East Brisbane.The second most viewed property this week was a home among the trees at 43 Lytham St, Indooroopilly.The four-bedroom home, described as a bush hideaway, is on the side of Mount Coot-Tha.It is on an elevated 1473 sqm block of land. The house has a separate study which would also be suitable for use as a bedroom. Nic Hunter who sold 21-23 Webb Rd, Sunshine Beach. Picture: Paul SmithAt close to $22 million, the estate will change hands for three times what owner IT entrepreneur Daniel Wallis paid five years ago.With a substantially smaller price tag of $89,900 you could secure the fourth most viewed home this week.For that money you get the three-bedroom house at 5 Imbros St, Nundah – but that’s all you get.The house itself is for sale for removal, the land doesn’t come with it but the price does cover delivery, within a certain distance. 5 Imbros St, Nundah is for sale – land not included. Picture: realestate.com.auIt has a central open plan lounge and dining room, polished timber floors throughout and original bathroom, there is also an iron roof.It is listed for sale through Drake Removal Homes.The fifth most viewed Queensland property on realestate.com.au comes with the land and also amazing views.Unfortunately though you won’t be able to buy it. The house at 42 Raven St, Camp Hill went to auction last week and is now under contract. 106-110 Virginia Ave, HawthornePOTENTIAL buyers were transfixed by a Hawthorne mega-mansion with its own putting green, making it the most viewed Queensland property this week on realestate.com.au.The home at 106-110 Virginia Ave, Hawthorne, has five bedrooms, and is on 2137sq m of land on the riverfront. 21-23 Webb Rd, Sunshine Beach. Picture: Paul SmithThe listing price for the home was $22 million but agents can’t divulge the sale price due to a confidentiality agreement.It was listed through Nic Hunter of Tom Offermann Real Estate. 42 Raven St, Camp Hill. Picture: realestate.com.auThere are multiple indoor and outdoor living areas and bedrooms on both levels.The main bedroom also has a parent’s retreat and luxurious ensuite with walk-in robe, floor to ceiling tiling, lava stone benchtops and mirrored splashback.It was listed through Shane Hicks and Dion Tolley of Place Estate Agents.last_img read more

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High Court stands by DCMS orders on EuroMillions third-party betting

first_img StumbleUpon UKGC launches fourth National Lottery licence competition August 28, 2020 Share Submit Ministers expected to raise National Lottery age limit August 17, 2020 Related Articles Camelot aims for ‘Big September’ supporting a high street recovery August 26, 2020 Share Operators of digital lottery syndicates have been handed a severe blow by the High Court of England & Wales, which has rejected the combined appeal of Lottoland and Multi Lotto UK to allow bets on ‘EuroMillions’ draws in other countries.  In February of this year, Lottoland and Multi Lotto sanctioned a high court appeal against the UK Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sports (DCMS) and its ‘interested parties’ – the UK Gambling Commission (UKGC) and National Lottery operator Camelot UK. The digital claimants demanded that DCMS remove 2018 amendments introduced to the ‘Gambling Act 2005’, which would prohibit betting on the outcome of non-UK EuroMillions lottery draws, regulations that were subsequently enforced from 6 April 2018.  Established under the mandate of the ‘National Lottery Act 1993’, and reinforced by the Gambling Act 2005, no third party is allowed to offer betting services, markets or promotions on National Lottery outcomes.  Adhering to UK laws on the National Lottery, remote-based operators such as Lottoland and Multi Lotto have taken bets for EuroMillions – a pan-European lottery game that is not operated by Camelot or governed by the UKGC, but for the outcome of non-UK draws.However, the DCMS approved UKGC regulations that closed this loophole – namely offering bets on “the outcome of a non-UK EuroMillions draw or on the result of a EuroMillions lottery, regardless of the name given to that lottery or how that lottery is described in any jurisdiction”. Lottoland and Multi Lotto claimed that DCMS and the UKGC’s amendments had denied their enterprises from offering a service that is controlled beyond their regulatory remits, thus unfairly favouring Camelot services. The DCMS and UKGC justified the amendments stating that synthetic lotteries undermined the position of Camelot as operator of the National Lottery and UK distributor of EuroMillions tickets, raising money for good causes. Moving forward with their appeal, Lottoland and Multi Lotto representatives asked UK justices to review three underlying arguments against DCMS and its interested parties: Did the 2017/18 amendments breach European Union business laws on member state governments restricting enterprise services – set out under the guiding provisions of ‘The Treaty of a Functioning European Union –TFEU’.  
Did DCMS conduct a fair consultation on the EuroMillions amendments – impartial towards the UKGC and Camelot’s existing positions?  
Could the claimants change the ‘locus (point of appeal)’ bringing their claim to a new judiciary outside of UK courts?  Reviewed by Lord Justice Green and Justice Gross, the UK High Court judged that the amendments had been fair and within DCMS remit as the new regulations did not impose an unlawful restriction on freedom to provide services. The High Court justices detailed that DCMS could maintain its amendments on the ‘grounds of protecting recognised public policy initiatives’ such as securing National Lottery funds. In addition, the High Court determined that individual ‘member-state gambling policy is not a harmonised legal discipline’ across EU jurisdictions, allowing DCMS and its associates to carry-out policy corrections/amendments. With regards to conducting ‘a fair consultation’, the High Court ruled that DCMS had presented a ‘legitimate policy basis’ for its new regulations, that had fulfilled the requirements of an ‘overall proportionality assessment’ required for legislative approval. Concluding its judgement, the High Court justices, detailed that claimants could move to change court locus granting permission for future judicial reviews. However, locus appeals would merit no legal mandate for changes to the approved regulations… which will simply be dismissed.last_img read more

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