Shore Invites Community to Free “Be Well Connected” Osteoporosis Awareness Education Breakfast May 9

first_imgIn recognition of Osteoporosis Awareness and Prevention month, Shore is hosting a free community breakfast to educate the public about osteoporosis prevention and awareness on Wednesday, May 9, from 10 am to noon. This event, which is part of Shore Physicians Group’s 2018 educational health series, “Be Well Connected,” will be held at Greate Bay Country Club, located at 901 Mays Landing Rd., Somers Point, NJ.Guests will enjoy a continental breakfast while hearing from Shore Physicians Group and Shore Medical Center experts, with time allotted for questions between each topic.The presentations include:Know Your Risk, presented by Dr. Linda Brecher, DO, FACOI, FACR, Rheumatologist, Shore Physicians GroupStrengthening Your Bones Through Exercise, presented by Jennifer Pesce, PT, DPT, Director of Rehabilitation, Shore Medical CenterHow to Pack More Calcium into Your Diet, presented by Saba Zahid, RD, Patient Experience Manager, Food and Nutrition Services, Shore Medical CenterFor more information or to RSVP, contact Katie Byrnes at 609.653.3500 ext 3435 or via email [email protected] OsteoporosisMay is Osteoporosis Awareness and Prevention month. Osteoporosis is a common condition affecting over 10 million Americans. Most of those people have no symptoms of the disease until they have a fracture (broken bone). Osteoporosis causes deterioration of bone quality which does not cause pain or any other symptoms. The only symptom of osteoporosis is a broken bone. This can occur without trauma – including sneezing, tripping, or turning over in bed.Osteoporosis risk factors include:Gender – Women are 4 times more likely to develop osteoporosis.Age – Women and men over the age of 50 have the greatest risk for developing osteoporosis. Bone density decreases with age as does the risk for falls, both contribute to fractures from osteoporosis.Ethnicity – Caucasian and Asian women are at the highest risk for developing osteoporosis. African American and Hispanic women can develop osteoporosis but seem to have less risk.Family History – This is one of the highest risk for osteoporosis and fracture. The risk is very high if a first degree relative has had a fracture over age 50 involving hip, wrist, or hip.Low Body Weight – weighing less than 127 pounds increases risk for osteoporosis and fracture.Smoking – Profound bone loss is associated with older women and men who smoke.Excessive Alcohol Consumption – More than 2 alcoholic drinks a day increases risk for osteoporosis. More than four alcoholic drinks a day can double fracture risk.Medications – certain common medications increase the risk for osteoporosis. This includes but is not limited to:Steroids Proton Pump Inhibitors (Prilosec, Nexium, Prevacid)Certain anti seizure medications – Dilantin and phenobarbitalArimidex, Aromasin, Femara – medications used to treat breast cancerCyclosporin, Tacrolimus – medications used in transplant.Chronic Diseases – Inflammatory disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, COPD, Inflammatory bowel disease. Hyperthyroidism, hyperparathyroidism. Chronic kidney and chronic liver disease.Lack of exercise – bone is stimulated by exercise – weight bearing and strength training (light weights). Lack of activity and sedentary lifestyle lead to further bone loss.Shore Physicians Group’s 2018 educational health series, “Be Well Connected,” began in January, with an event focused on “Dementia, Management, and the Future.” The series will continue with an event in July about the effects of aging and dementia, and an event in November focused on diabetes.About Shore Physicians GroupShore Physicians Group is a multi-specialty medical group focused on providing the highest quality of care and making the complex healthcare system simple for patients By choosing Shore Physicians Group, patients are connected to the area’s most highly skilled, caring and passionate practitioners, who provide quality care and the best medical outcomes in the fields of family, internal, pulmonary and critical care medicine, endocrinology, urology, neurology, rheumatology and general, laparoscopic, neurological and reconstructive surgery. Shore Physicians Group, which has practice locations in Egg Harbor Township, Mays Landing, Margate, Marmora, Northfield, Ocean City and Somers Point, NJ, also operates Shore Urgent Care in Northfield. In addition, Shore Physicians Group operates disease-specific centers including the Osteoporosis Center and the Flora Baker Center for Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders, sponsored by Shore Medical Center. For more information about Shore Physicians Group, visit ShorePhysiciansGroup.com. Greate Bay Country Club will be the location for Ocean City’s Colony Club Fashion Show in June.last_img read more

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12 Days Of Phishmas: A Five Song Second Set For The Ages On 12/29/97

first_imgIn 8 short days, Phish will settle in at Madison Square Garden for their traditional end-of-the-year run. Phish is no stranger to the Garden, having now played the famed venue in the heart of New York City 35 times over the course of their career. From their MSG debut in 1994 to their most recent appearances at the very beginning of 2016, the storied room has played host to some of the most treasured shows in the band’s history. As we inch closer to this year’s New Year’s Run, we will be bringing you our 12 Days Of Phishmas series, highlighting a different milestone MSG Phish show each day until we all head back to the Garden on the 28th. It wasn’t easy narrowing 35 down to 12, but we think you’ll be pleased with these classics from the Phish catalog. Enjoy! On the fifth day of Phishmas, we head to December 29th, 1997. ’97 was, of course, a landmark year for Phish. After successful European tours in the Winter and Spring and The Great Went festival in August, the band absolutely crushed their 21-date Fall tour in November and December, remembered fondly by fans as the time that Phish Destroyed America. It’s one of the best tours of their career, as they showcased their new groove-oriented style of jamming known as “cow-funk”. The tour was a wild success, finishing up on December 13th in Albany, ultimately giving Phish a mere 15 days off before their traditional New Year’s run began. The band performed one show at USAir Arena in Landover, MD on 12/28 before heading to New York for a three-night New Year’s Eve run at Madison Square Garden. They kicked off the run with a blistering show on December 29th that featured a second set for the ages, as Phish played an exciting and improv-heavy five-song run.The first set had its merits, with a bust out of Robert Johnson‘s “Crossroads” and an awesome “Theme From The Bottom” into “Fluffhead”. Yet, the second set is what truly stands out from 12/29/1997,  It all started with “Down With Disease”. The band had tons of energy as they launched into the “DWD” jam, with Trey Anastasio showing off his speed and confidence right out of the gate. He was strong throughout the 23-minute version of the song. After 10 minutes of straight forward jamming, the band dissolved into their cow-funk style, with Page using his clavinet to full effect. The band would bring that jam to a huge peak before transitioning into “David Bowie”.“Bowie” had an intro jam with crazy ambient playing, with Jon Fishman contributing a unique, hi-hat led drum beat. The “Bowie” jam saw Anastasio and Page McConnell linking up for an extended improv section, chasing each other’s musical tails around the stage.  They eventually locked back in with Fishman and Mike Gordon on a section that got more and more intense as Anastasio’s explosive playing pushed the whole band. Finally, they returned to complete the song with the zany energy that only Phish can produce.Right as it felt like they would bring “Bowie” to its natural peak, they dropped into “Possum”. “Possum” featured a jam based around Otis Redding‘s “I Can’t Turn You Loose”, which McConnell started and the full band eventually picked up. This made for a unique version of “Possum”, as the band remained on the theme before for a bit before finishing up the song. The band returned to “Can’t Turn You Loose” again at the end of the song as well for a quick reprise.A cow-funk-heavy “Tube” was perfect for blowing off some steam after the blistering opening hour of the set. Anastasio used his looping pedal to create some interesting sounds, while McConnell took the lead on what turned out to be a keyboard-heavy jam. Page teased “I Feel the Earth Move” by Carole King, which the band links up on for a moment before they completed the 10-minute “Tube”.“You Enjoy Myself” capped off the set. “YEM” clocked in around 18 minutes long, and served as the ultimate cap to the excellent five-song set. It featured another short cow-funk jam that saw McConnell reprise his “Can’t Turn You Loose” tease, and the vocal jam came right out of an ambient dissolve at the end of the jam.In the end, those five songs totaled 82 minutes, showing just how much they stretched things over the course of this Madison Square Garden classic. It was a wild set filled with highlights, as the band continued to push each other into new musical directions. The band returned to the stage and encored with Led Zeppelin‘s “Good Times Bad times” to bring the show to its conclusion. Of course, this was only the beginning of their famed 1997 New Years Eve run at MSG, as the band had several tricks still left up their sleeves.Watch the full second set from 12/29/1997, courtesy of YouTube user The Phish Jams, below.Setlist: Phish | Madison Square Garden | New York, NY | 12/29/1997Set 1: NICU > Golgi Apparatus > Crossroads, Cars Trucks Buses, Train Song, Theme From the Bottom > Fluffhead, Dirt, Run Like an AntelopeSet 2: Down with Disease [1] -> David Bowie [2] > Possum, Tube, You Enjoy MyselfEncore: Good Times Bad TimesDisease was unfinished. Bowie included Antelope-esque jamming and a tease from Mike of the Theme from James Bond. Possum contained a Can’t Turn You Loose jam, which was briefly reprised after the song and teased by Page in YEM. Tube featured an I Feel the Earth Move tease. The soundcheck’s Funky Bitch featured Trey on vocals. This show is available as an archival release on LivePhish.com.[1] Unfinished.[2] Antelope-esque jamming. James Bond Theme tease from Mike.Stay tuned over the coming days for more Phishmas! ‘Tis the season!On the fifth day of Phishmas, a Phish phan played for me…a Five Song Second Set (12/29/97)Four Light Year Jams (12/29/98)Three Phishy Decades (12/31/13)Two Sitting Legends (10/22/96) and The Gamehendge Time Factory (12/31/95)!If you’re attending the run, there are plenty of things to do in between shows. For fans of the jam, head to any of these concerts in the area for a guaranteed good time!12/28: Aqueous + Mungion @ DROM (Phish After-Party) – tickets12/30: Phan Art w/ Formula 5 @ American Beauty (Phish Pre-Party) – FREE SHOW12/30-31: Spafford & Magic Beans @ American Beauty (Phish After-Party) – ticketslast_img read more

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To the top

first_imgBy Stephanie Schupska University of Georgia From bicycle-powered light bulbs to algae bubbling in plastic bags, 30 universities showed off their biofuels research under a circus-size tent at the second annual Bioenergy Awareness Days in Washington June 19.The three-day event took place at both the Whitten Federal Building of the U.S. Department of Agriculture and at the National Arboretum. Close to 80 exhibitors were featured. The University of Georgia is among 13 winners of the Grand Challenge, an honor that allowed them to exhibit at both locations. The title recognizes universities for their leadership in renewable energy research, teaching and outreach and for their collaborations with other private or public institutions.“The Grand Challenge was looking and challenging universities to work with other universities and industries and other institutions to develop a vision on how to meet the energy concern in the next few years,” said Gale Buchanan, USDA under secretary for research, education and economics and former dean of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. The USDA and the 25x’25 Alliance sponsored the challenge. 25x’25 is a coalition of leaders from agricultural, forestry and renewable energy communities. They are committed to providing 25 percent of the nation’s energy from farms and forests by 2025. The exhibit dates were chosen for their proximity to the summer solstice on June 21, the longest day of the year. Researchers from UGA’s Athens and Tifton campuses hauled algae, chicken fat, wood pellets, a remote-controlled tractor and sugar cane through Georgia, the Carolinas, Virginia, D.C. and finally Maryland to participate in the event at the National Arboretum. For three days they faced cameras and fielded questions like, “Chicken fat? Really?” Mention algae and chicken fat together, and visitors, reporters and dignitaries alike headed eagerly toward UGA’s lab-like display, which was set up in a walk-through trailer. K.C. Das, a CAES associate professor and director of UGA’s Biorefining and Carbon Cycling Program, estimates algae will be commercially viable as a source for biofuel in about five years. Algae have the potential for producing 2,000 gallons of oil per acre annually. In comparison, soybeans produce 48 gallons an acre. Corn produces 18 gallons an acre. Much of the research UGA displayed is already being put to commercial use. In north Georgia chicken fat is manufactured as biodiesel. Pellets made from both peanut hulls and Georgia’s timber scraps are being burned for fuel. The UGA remote-controlled “sipping” tractor runs on both ethanol and solar power and earns its name by sipping just enough fuel to keep going. And sugar cane is just one of many crops UGA researchers are putting through the grind in search of better biomass. More than 80 researchers and economists are working on basic and applied biofuels research, collaborating through UGA’s Biofuels, Biopower and Biomaterials Initiative (B3I). From rotten fruit to cotton stalks, they’re searching for the second generation of biofuels that will produce energy without eating up valuable food crops.(Stephanie Schupska is a news editor with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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Noah Rhynhart adds potential scoring threat to SU offense

first_img Published on August 31, 2015 at 9:06 pm Contact Chris: [email protected] | @ChrisLibonati Facebook Twitter Google+ Noah Rhynhart scored two goals in the 2011 New York state club championship for Blackwatch Midlothian. The moment serves as Charles Rhynhart’s favorite memory of watching his son play soccer, but also as an aspect of Noah’s game that he’s trying to recapture this season — his scoring touch.“He was far above his peers in (speed and finishing ability), which made him a special player,” Jeff Rockmore, an assistant coach for Rhynhart’s club team said.But in 46 games at No. 15 Syracuse (1-1), Rhynhart has converted just two shots and taken 12. A senior, Rhynhart is stepping into more playing time and an increased scoring role in his last season at SU.The departure of about one-third of Syracuse’s offense from last season has left a void that Rhynhart will have to help fill. After coming to Syracuse as a Top 150 recruit in the ESPN Rise rankings, he’s started two games in parts of four seasons.“Hopefully I can show (that I’ve improved my finishing) this year because, for a forward, I don’t have as many goals as I’d like in my career,” Rhynhart said.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textRhynhart’s transition to the college game flipped his role. In high school, his teammates pushed the ball to him to score, Roslyn Jefferson, Rhynhart’s mother said. At Syracuse, he pushes the ball to teammates and has come off the bench.The transition wasn’t a simple one. Rhynhart enrolled at Syracuse early in the 2012 spring semester, but a misdiagnosed broken leg sidelined him, Charles Rhynhart said. Rhynhart missed practices, having to sit and watch his teammates play while he did core exercises on the sideline, but his mother doesn’t think the injury set her son back in his development.After missing time in his freshman season, Rhynhart sat behind newer players like Chris Nanco and Emil Ekblom in his sophomore and junior seasons. Ekblom led SU in scoring and started every game in 2013, while Rhynhart played just 13 of 21 games.“(Ekblom’s) a tough guy to try to knock out of the lineup,” Charles Rhynhart said.Approaching this season with Syracuse, Rhynhart knows this is his last chance. When he’s gone home during the summer, he’s worked with local club teams that have college-caliber coaches and players, Rockmore said. Rhynhart has worked on his ball-striking ability, including the angle he approaches the ball when he shoots, according to Rockmore.Rhynhart also said he’s learned to get shots off quicker, gaining confidence and shedding timidity that plagued him earlier in his career.  He was named team MVP after the spring season, his father said.“I’m seeing the team put the ball up to him more readily and kind of more trusting relationship,” Charles Rhynhart said.Adding finishing ability to his speed makes him a potentially dangerous pairing with Nanco, SU head coach Ian McIntyre said. Rhynhart said when the two are on the field, their speed can help stretch the defense.Rhynhart’s father describes his son’s playing style as passing the ball to teammates and making off-ball runs instead of dribbling through the defense, which can help him play off of Nanco and vice versa.Despite Rhynhart’s improvements, he is goalless in three exhibitions and two regular season games this season, and he knows his role could be diminished if he can’t produce.“At the end of the day,” Rhynhart said, “for the forwards, it’s whoever’s scoring the goals is going to play.” Commentslast_img read more

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