Social Justice Spotlight

first_imgKip Tiernan BI ’89, founder of Rosie’s Place and the Greater Boston Food Bank and co-founder of Community Works and the Poor People’s United Fund, gave her papers to the Schlesinger Library in 2006 so that scholars and citizens can learn more about how and why she pursued her passion for social justice. That was just one part of a special connection forged between the social justice pioneer and the Radcliffe Institute library.When she died in 2011, at 85, it was important that her commitment to the downtrodden and disenfranchised live on. One way her legacy continues at Harvard is through the event that took place yesterday hosted by the Schlesinger Library and Community Works, a cooperative of 34 local grassroots organizations devoted to social and economic justice.The executive director of Community Works, Fran Froelich, worked with Tiernan for years to pursue community-based solutions to entrenched challenges, including homelessness, hunger, and violence. She spoke about Tiernan at the event, saying “She told the truth—held it up—and invited us to join her in searching for solutions.”To honor Tiernan’s pursuit of truth and her commitment to improving the quality of life for all people, Froelich presented the organization’s Striving for Justice Award to David Hemenway AB ’66, PhD ’74, professor of health policy at the Harvard School of Public Health. The award was given in recognition of his efforts to understand and prevent injury and violence as director of the Harvard Injury Control Research Center and the Harvard Youth Violence Prevention Center and as the author of many books, including While We Were Sleeping: Success Stories in Injury and Violence Prevention (University of California Press, 2009).Hemenway, who was honored to accept the award, shared some insights into his work collecting data about homicide and suicides, and how he and his colleagues are learning more about violence and its causes as they analyze the information. His remarks—which included insights into soda drinking, accidental poisonings, and gun ownership—illustrated what Froelich said in her introduction: “David’s field of public health has deep moral connections to broader questions of social justice, poverty, and systematic disadvantage.”His remarks were followed by a discussion with young people searching for solutions to youth violence and active in Alternatives for Community and Environment and the Hawthorne Youth and Community Center, two organizations that are part of Community Works.The combination of statistics and the stories was a fitting testament to Kip Tiernan’s commitment to highlighting the power of experts and community groups to raise awareness, tackle difficult issues, make a meaningful difference, and inspire others. The event was also an opportunity to remind people about the mission of Community Works, its participation in the Harvard Community Gifts campaign, and access to Tiernan’s papers at the Schlesinger Library.last_img read more

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Family-style fun

first_imgBy Diane BalesUniversity of Georgia Mealtimes are one of the best opportunities to help children grow and learn. Families can share conversation and time together, while teaching healthy eating habits in a relaxed environment. Many families are so busy they, unfortunately, don’t set regular times to eat together. Here are some easy steps to set a routine to make family mealtimes possible and enjoyable.Pick consistent days and times. Reserve the time on your calendar and rearrange other commitments so everyone can be there. If schedules are too busy, start by choosing one or two evenings a week to have dinner as a family. Eat at the table. Children tend to get distracted easily. Sitting down at the table helps children focus on their food and pay attention to the family conversation. Make a rule that distractions such as television and cell phones are not allowed at the dinner table.Serve “family-style” whenever possible. Put the food in serving containers on the table, and encourage everyone, including young children, to use serving utensils to put food on their plates. Family-style service may seem like a lot of trouble, but it actually helps children practice motor skills and begins teaching them how to take control of the amount of food they eat. Teach portions. Many children don’t know what a portion looks like. You can guide children while still allowing them to serve themselves by saying things like, “Take just one piece of chicken for now. If you are still hungry after you eat that chicken, you can have more.” A young child’s portion is smaller than one for a teenager or an adult.Handle spills casually. Eating with a fork or spoon is a skill that requires practice. Young children are still learning how to control their hand and finger muscles. They might spill or drop food. Putting a plastic mat under your child’s chair can help contain the mess. When spills happen, stay calm. Acknowledge that everyone spills sometimes. Get your child to help clean it up and continue with the meal. Keep a wet cloth handy to make spills less distracting.Talk with your children. Mealtime is a great chance to share ideas and thoughts and to encourage children’s language development by involving them in conversations. Ask children questions and encourage them to answer. You can also model conversations by including children – even infants and toddlers – in discussions. Even if you and your child are the only ones sharing the meal, be sure to spend some time talking.Encourage children to try new foods, but don’t force them. Many young children are reluctant to try new foods, and will eat familiar foods first. Help your children ease into accepting new foods step by step. Introduce only one new food at a meal. Pair a food they’ve never tried with one they like. Start with smooth-textured foods like corn, chicken or pears. Cut new food into bite-sized pieces to make them easier to handle. Describe the new food, teach children its name and talk about what it looks like. Encourage them to touch and smell it if they are not ready to taste it yet. Remember that children are more likely to try a new food if they see you enjoying it. Be realistic about the length of the meal. Young children have very short attention spans. Don’t be surprised if your toddler or four-year-old is finished eating after a few minutes. Encourage children to sit with the family for a few minutes if others are still eating, but allow them to get up and do another activity nearby when they get impatient or squirmy. Having a few simple toys close to the table will enable children to be near the rest of the family while they finish the meal.Keep mealtime routines consistent. Children’s brains develop best through repetition. Do the same things in the same order every time you eat a meal together. Over time, children will learn what to expect at mealtime. The predictable routine will help them feel comfortable and secure.You don’t have to serve gourmet food. Even a simple, healthy meal like chicken and rice can be an enjoyable family gathering if you take time to follow a consistent mealtime routine.(Diane Bales is a human development specialist with University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and the College of Family and Consumer Sciences.)last_img read more

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Chuba Hubbard says speaking out turned his social media into a ‘playground for hate’

first_imgThe Cowboys player also called for the resignation of Oklahoma County District Attorney David Prater in a tweet he’s since deleted. In the tweet, Hubbard said Prater “overstepped his position by allowing police brutality and excessive force to continue against demonstrators exercising the First Amendment in Oklahoma City, OK.”MORE: 2020 college football bowl projectionsHe sent a few additional tweets saying Prater “is abusing his power as an elected official.” He also called on his followers to call Prater’s office and “1. Drop all charges against demonstrators, 2. End qualified immunity, 3. Re-open the Isaiah Lewis case, 4. End cash bail, and 5. Resign.” Oklahoma State star running back Chuba Hubbard is staying off social media for a while.Hubbard tweeted a statement Tuesday saying that his social media pages have turned into a “playground for hate” since he’s been more vocal on issues this offseason. Hubbard first gained attention when he threatened to hold out this upcoming football season after his coach, Mike Gundy, was seen wearing an OAN shirt. After his tweets started to gain traction, Hubbard deactivated his social media accounts. He later reinstated them, but said in a statement that he’s going to stay off the platforms for now.Peace be with you all 🖤 pic.twitter.com/u5leqHVfao— Chuba Hubbard (@Hubbard_RMN) July 21, 2020″I have never incited or promoted violence or hate. All I’ve done is voice my opinion on issues I feel are not ethical! I love all,” Hubbard wrote in his statement. “Even those that don’t see eye to eye with me! I will continue to play football at the highest level! That won’t ever stop! But I also won’t stop pushing for what I feel is right! With that being said .. I have noticed my social media has become a playground for hate. That’s the last thing I ever wanted to happen! I am a man, a Black man, a human. Everything I’ve ever said or done in my life I own! All the love and hate I own!”Hubbard opened the door to a return to Twitter, but for the time being he’s staying away.last_img read more

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