Big, bright home in an ideal spot in Gumdale

first_imgThe kitchen at 7 Terraldon Cct, Gumdale.On the ground floor there is an open-plan living, dining and kitchen area that flows out through sliding doors to the alfresco entertaining area.The kitchen has a breakfast bar, five-burner gas stove, dishwasher, and plenty of cupboard space.There is also a separate media room on the ground floor, along with a laundry, powder room and double lockup garage. The open-plan living area at 7 Terraldon Cct, Gumdale.“We only planned to stay for a couple of years but nine and half years later, we’re still here.“We love living in the area and we’re actually building just up the road.”Mrs Vitale said the home had a nice northerly aspect and was great for entertaining.“Downstairs in winter is absolutely gorgeous — you can open it up and the sun comes streaming in,” she said.More from newsCrowd expected as mega estate goes under the hammer7 Aug 2020Hard work, resourcefulness and $17k bring old Ipswich home back to life20 Apr 2020 The home at 7 Terraldon Cct, Gumdale.THIS well-presented two-storey home in the Links Estate is walking distance to the popular Gumdale Primary School and shops.Armando and Tammy Vitale bought the 7 Terraldon Cct new nine years ago and have loved calling Gumdale home.“We bought the home for the location, really,” Mrs Vitale said.“We’re just a short walk to the shops and tavern and, though we don’t need it, the school as well. The upstairs living area at 7 Terraldon Cct, Gumdale.Upstairs, the master bedroom has a walk-in robe, private balcony and an ensuite.The four other bedrooms have built-in wardrobes and there is a family bathroom and separate toilet. There is also a living space on the second floor.The property is fully fenced and features low-maintenance gardens, a water feature and garden shed. The outdoor entertaining area at 7 Terraldon Cct, Gumdale.The home is close to the Chandler Sports Complex, the Aquatic Learning Centre and daycare centres.Mrs Vitale said the home would suit families or empty nesters.The property is being marketed by Kyle Woodbine, of Ray White Wynnum Manly.last_img read more

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Euthanasia: Lethal dose has fearful consequences

first_imgSydney Morning Herald 15 October 2014On Wednesday, a Senate committee will hear evidence on a euthanasia bill that would allow some people to be given a lethal injection on compassionate grounds.I understand why some people want this. It’s often because someone they’ve known and loved has had a “hard dying”. Or because they are exhausted from caring for someone who is dying very slowly. Or because they are afraid of their own decline.I sympathise with these reasons. I know that those who support euthanasia are not all grizzly Dr Deaths. This challenges me to think about what “a good death” means and how our community responds to the elderly, frail, disabled and dying.But, however well-meaning, I don’t think giving people a lethal dose is the answer.Reason and experience show that euthanasia can’t be made safe, because no law can prevent abuse in this area. In places like Holland and Belgium the numbers being medically killed are escalating and the range of cases keeps expanding beyond the “last resorts” for which it was first sold to the public.Now people who aren’t terminally ill, aren’t even physically ill, people who haven’t volunteered or can’t volunteer, can legally be killed in those places and some want to extend it further – for example, to long-term prisoners and children.http://www.smh.com.au/comment/euthanasia-lethal-dose-has-fearful-consequences-20141014-115p18.html#ixzz3GA32mUIMlast_img read more

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`Reds’ Perreira thanks WICB for ‘forward thinking’

first_imgST LUCIA: Cricket commentator Joseph ‘Reds’ Perreira said that it is quite an honour to have a media bursary named after him and he congratulated the West Indies Cricket Board for what he described as ‘forward thinking’.The WICB and the University of the West Indies (UWI), through the Caribbean Institute of Media and Communications (CARIMAC), recently signed a Memorandum of Understanding for five bursaries to begin September 2017.The five bursaries are being named in honour of five Caribbean media stalwarts. The honorees are the late Roy Lawrence and Tony Cozier; Tony Becca, Headley Samuels and Joseph Perreira.Head of CARIMAC, Professor Hopeton Dunn says “the programme is geared towards affording students a specific interest in cricket as they pursue further education in Media/Communications programmes to include undergraduate studies in Integrated Marketing Communication, Journalism (Radio, Television, Print and Online) and Digital Media Production.This relationship is for three years. WICB president Dave Cameron says: “The investment is for US$150 000 over the period and the students who get selected for the bursaries will have access to work experience in WICB’s international and regional series and with other partners where applicable.”Cameron noted: “It was important that two of the oldest Caribbean institutions partnering for such an important programme is a signal of the commitment of the WICB to continue on to facilitate the growth of cricket across the region.“Education forms part of that role.” Perreira speaking about the move said. “It was quite an honour to be named among two outstanding broadcasters in the late Roy Lawrence & Tony Cozier and the outstanding Jamaican writer Tony Becca.“I felt it was forward thinking by WICB to come up with this programme of Bursaries and would like to wish those who are successful with their applications a bright future as journalists.“It would be very unwise of me to think that whatever progress and contribution I made as a cricket commentator that I did it all on my own.“In fact I owe a great deal to so many and it will be only fair that I credit and says thanks to people like Rafiq Khan, Hugh Cholmondeley, Ron Sanders and Terry Holder of Guyana.Leo De Leon, Dave Lammy and Neil Jiuseppi of (Trinidad and Tobago), Lindy Delapenha (Jamaica), Jerry Richards, Gene Lewis, Vic Fernandes (Barbados), Tannie Rose, Ivor Bird (Antigua), Bernard John (SVG) and Ray Roberts of Grenada.“My deep appreciation goes out to the CBU for creating the many opportunities to cover WI overseas tours and to Alva Clarke of the Commonwealth broadcasting association. I must not forget the important role of the many outstanding scorers during my active broadcasting life.”The Guyanese-born sportscaster added :”It was also an honour and privilege to have worked alongside the late and outstanding Tony Cozier, as he set such a high standard. It was impossible not to make efforts to get up towards the level of his commentary.At his passing, we were not just colleagues but close friends and he should have been knighted, for his contribution to West Indies and world cricket. (Windies.com)last_img read more

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Team Alanis’ Alonzo Ambrose wins gruelling 98-mile cycle road race

first_imgRIDING in wet conditions from Georgetown to Camp Seweyo on the Linden Highway and back is no easy task, but Team Alanis’ Alonzo Ambrose made it look like a walk in the park on Sunday, winning the 98-mile event in easy fashion with a time of four hours 25 minutes 52 seconds.The win for Ambrose in the Guyana Cycling Federation (GCF)-organised event earned him 15 points in the Federation’s point standings, still 23 points shy of leader Jamal John who earned eight points for placing fourth on Sunday.It was the Federation’s fourth points race for the 2017 season and John won the first two and did not participate in the third.Sunday’s race started at 08:00hrs on Homestretch Avenue and proceeded to Timehri Bottle, before turning on the Linden Highway for the journey to Camp Seweyo and turning back to finish at the place of origin.Team Evolution’s Christopher Griffith and Team Coco’s Junior Niles occupied the second- and third-place respectively.Griffith earned 12 points and Niles 10.Griffith’s teammate Paul DeNobrega (six points) finished fifth.The first junior to cross the finish line was Adalie Hodge, while Marcus Keiler and Nigel Duguid placed second and third respectively.In the veterans’ category, Leer Nunes and Everal Mundy placed first and second in that order.The GCF’s races are being staged with the aim of selecting cyclists for overseas engagements, but consideration will also be given to those Guyanese who are training and competing overseas.last_img read more

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B&H Tennis Players Beat Finland

first_imgThe B&H tennis team reached the third round of the second group of the Euro-African Zone Davis Cup.B&H tennis players beat Finland in the second round with 3:2. Mirza Bašić brought the decisive point for B&H, who beat Juho Paukku in the fifth match with 3:6, 4:6, 6:3, 7:5, 6:4.Bašić was the hero in the victory over Finland, given that he achieved two victories, of which one was against the 45th player in the world Jarkko Nieminen on the first day of the competition.B&H tennis players will be hosts to the Lithuanian team in September, for the third round and the match placement to the first group of the Euro-African zone. Lithuania beat South Africa with 3:2.(Source: Fena)last_img

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Finding the Da Vinci code

first_imgThe result is a 40-second “hymn to God” that Pala said sounds best on a pipe organ, the instrument most commonly used in Leonardo’s time for spiritual music. A short segment taken from a CD of the piece contained a Bach-like passage played on the organ. The tempo was almost painfully slow but musical. Alessandro Vezzosi, a Leonardo expert and the director of a museum dedicated to the artist in his hometown of Vinci, said he had not seen Pala’s research but that the musician’s hypothesis “is plausible.” Vezzosi said previous research has indicated the hands of the Apostles in the painting can be substituted with the notes of a Gregorian chant, though so far no one had tried to work in the bread loaves. “There’s always a risk of seeing something that is not there, but it’s certain that the spaces (in the painting) are divided harmonically,” he said. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! ROME – It’s a new Da Vinci code, but this time it could be for real. An Italian musician and computer technician claims to have uncovered musical notes encoded in Leonardo Da Vinci’s “Last Supper,” raising the possibility that the Renaissance genius might have left behind a somber composition to accompany the scene depicted in the 15th-century wall painting. “It sounds like a requiem,” Giovanni Maria Pala said. “It’s like a soundtrack that emphasizes the passion of Jesus.” Painted from 1494 to 1498 in Milan’s Church of Santa Maria delle Grazie, the “Last Supper” vividly depicts a key moment in the Gospel narrative: Jesus’ last meal with the 12 Apostles before his arrest and crucifixion, and the shock of Christ’s followers as they learn that one of them is about to betray him. Pala, a 45-year-old musician who lives near the southern Italian city of Lecce, began studying Leonardo’s painting in 2003, after hearing on a news program that researchers believed the artist and inventor had hidden a musical composition in the work. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREStriving toward a more perfect me: Doug McIntyre “Afterward, I didn’t hear anything more about it,” he said in an interview. “As a musician, I wanted to dig deeper.” In a book released Friday in Italy, Pala explains how he took elements of the painting that have symbolic value in Christian theology and interpreted them as musical clues. Pala first saw that by drawing the five lines of a musical staff across the painting, the loaves of bread on the table as well as the hands of Jesus and the Apostles could each represent a musical note. This fit the relation in Christian symbolism between the bread, representing the body of Christ, and the hands, which are used to bless the food, he said. But the notes made no sense musically until Pala realized that the score had to be read from right to left, following Leonardo’s particular writing style. In his book – “La Musica Celata” (“The Hidden Music”) – Pala also describes how he found what he says are other clues in the painting that reveal the slow rhythm of the composition and the duration of each note. last_img read more

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