Ronnie McAllister

first_imgMost of you have seen Ronnie McAllister running the streets and roads around Batesville.  The Aurora native and Batesville resident is nearing a running milestone.  When he starts his 2017 road races, he will be 149 races short of 1,000.  Ronnie began this quest in 1982 and hopes to finish it in the next few years.In high school McAllister was a hurdler in track and a cross country runner at South Dearborn.  He credits Coach Mark Wilhelm for giving him the running bug.  They try to run at least 2 races together each season.  Ronnie lists the Popcorn Panic in Valparaiso and the Southeast Indiana racing circuit as 2 of his favorites.  Most of his races are 5 or 10k, but he has run marathons.Ronnie, along with his racing buddy Leo Turchyn, coached together in Batesville from 1999-2011.  A lot of his 851 runs were alongside his long-time friend, Leo.  I consider Ronnie of my good friends since his running days at South Dearborn High School.  I would like to thank Jim Buchberger for a lot of this information.last_img read more

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LeBron says he ‘will definitely not shut up and dribble’

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. LOS ANGELES, CA – FEBRUARY 17: LeBron James #23 of Team LeBron is introduced for for the upcoming 2018 NBA All-Star game during practice at the Verizon Up Arena at LACC on February 17, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty ImagesLOS ANGELES — LeBron James says he will not stick to sports.The Cleveland Cavaliers superstar reiterated his determination to speak out on social issues and the nation’s political climate Saturday during his media availability for the NBA All-Star Game.ADVERTISEMENT James referenced Muhammad Ali, Jim Brown, Bill Russell and Jackie Robinson as athletes who previously spoke up for equality and change without concerns about the consequences or any rewards.“We know it’s bigger than us,” James said. “It’s not about us. I’m going to continue to do what I have to do to play this game that I love to play, but this is bigger than me playing the game of basketball.”James was backed at media day by several All-Stars including Stephen Curry, Paul George, Draymond Green and Durant. They all believe athletes have an important opportunity to advocate for positive social change.“We’re a part of what’s going on this world, what’s going on in this society, just as much as anybody else,” said George, the Oklahoma City Thunder forward from nearby Palmdale, California. “We’re fathers. We’re sons. We’re brothers. We’ve got family to look after. We’re connected as deeply in this as anybody else is. For someone to go out and say, ‘Stick to dribbling a basketball,’ that’s pretty ignorant. That just goes to show you where we are as a country right now.”Curry called the Fox News host’s comments and dismissive tone “aggressive and just out of line … but not surprising, because I’ve heard that plenty of times before.”ADVERTISEMENT View comments Resurgence Trump: Don’t feel like I’m being impeached PLAY LIST 01:09Trump: Don’t feel like I’m being impeached02:26Trump lashes out as impeachment trial is in limbo02:31Palace ‘not bothered’ by Trump OK on US ban vs De Lima jailers02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award LATEST STORIES Sea turtle trapped in net freed in Legazpi City “I will not just shut up and dribble,” James said. “I get to sit up here and talk about what’s really important.”James spoke publicly afer Fox News host Laura Ingraham criticized the three-time NBA champion for his recent comments about social issues. James previously responded with an Instagram post containing similar sentiments.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folk“We will definitely not shut up and dribble,” James said. “I will definitely not do that. I mean too much to society. I mean too much to the youth. I mean too much to so many kids that feel like they don’t have a way out and they need someone to help lead them out of the situation they’re in.”James made the initial public comments in question during a recent video segment on Uninterrupted, a platform co-founded by James. He was joined by Kevin Durant, and both superstars were sharply critical of President Donald Trump and the nation’s racial climate. Phivolcs records 2 ‘discrete weak ash explosions’ at Taal Volcano Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours GALLERY: Barangay Ginebra back as PBA Governors’ Cup kings MOST READ Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew “That’s the tone that people (utilize to) try to put athletes and black athletes in a box, to say, ’Basketball is the only thing that you can provide in this world,’” Curry said. “It’s really, obviously, very upsetting. I think the way that we handle the response is to highlight all the good that we’re doing … Every single NBA athlete here that plays this game, that’s not what we’re about. That’s not all that we contribute to this world.“Guys are going out, putting resources and funds, and raising awareness in the community and trying to make the world a better place through what we do.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Phivolcs records 2 ‘discrete weak ash explosions’ at Taal Volcano Nueva Ecija warehouse making fake cigarettes raided, 29 Chinese workers nabbed It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson UK plans Brexit celebrations but warns businesses may sufferlast_img read more

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Courts’ load lightened in Bay Area

first_imgSAN FRANCISCO – A drunken 29-year-old man steals a pair of jeans from a discount store in the city’s Mission District. He coerces the clerk into paying him $3 to return the merchandise, then uses the money to buy a 40-ounce beer. Normally, such petty crimes would further clog an overburdened court system and cost taxpayers about $1,200 per case. But in San Francisco’s innovative community court, the man’s case is heard by his peers – literally. The panel is composed of a Mission bar owner, a police officer and two community service advocates. A lawyer acts as an arbitrator. They question the defendant around a conference table at a nonprofit agency that donates space for community court once a month. There is no judge or jury, at least not in the traditional sense. “I was drunk,” the soft-spoken man tells the panelists, shaking his head. “I don’t really do that.” She said Cook County, which includes Chicago, hasn’t yet embraced the concept for adult offenders. “The usual reaction is the adversarial system: Lock `em up, punish `em. This is another type of response that can have the community and the offender looking at what the causes are.” The Mission District panel heard nine cases in about two hours on a recent Thursday. In the jeans case, the panel ordered alcohol awareness classes. Claims against other defendants ranged from prostitution to selling cigarettes to minors.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! San Francisco’s community court program was established in 1998 to divert misdemeanor cases that directly impact residents’ quality of life – prostitution, shoplifting, vandalism – out of the courts and into the neighborhood. More than 100 volunteers now staff panels in 11 neighborhoods. “We’re all regular people, and we’re making decisions,” said attorney Angela Xavier, the Mission District panel’s arbitrator. “It’s the community taking care of the community.” The district attorney’s staff sifts through nonviolent misdemeanors and sends eligible cases to the neighborhood where the crime occurred. If defendants successfully complete the panel’s requirement, no criminal charges are filed, and their records stay clean. Last year 2,976 cases were referred to community courts, saving the criminal justice system and the city an estimated $3.6 million, according to the San Francisco district attorney. People elsewhere have noticed. “It’s a much more positive way to address the problem,” said Sophia H. Hall, a judge with the Circuit Court of Cook County, Ill., who promotes the use of community courts and peer juries among juveniles. last_img
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