Change in the air at HSPH

first_imgThis is one of a series of occasional stories on the measures that Schools at Harvard are taking to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.While testing a new air-monitoring system in a laboratory at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH), Daniel O. Beaudoin intentionally spilled a small amount of acetone on the floor. The system detected the substance, increased airflow to the space, and cleared the air in just 36 minutes. The acetone melted the wax right off the floor tiles, a small price to pay for improved safety — and sustainability.In 2008, Harvard President Drew Faust announced the University’s goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 30 percent from 2006 levels by 2016 (including growth). To date, HSPH has cut its emissions by 19 percent, and the School’s investments in energy efficiency have resulted in savings of more than $1.3 million per year since 2006.Systems installed in laboratories have contributed significantly to the School’s energy savings. (Many are from Aircuity, a Newton, Mass., sustainable design company.) Labs require a constant supply of fresh air that must be cleaned, heated or cooled, and humidified. After this intensive process, none of the treated air can be recirculated.Each Aircuity system at HSPH reduces energy consumption by adjusting the number of air changes per hour in a lab based on actual conditions in the space.“The Aircuity system pulls columns of air from a lab through a vacuum pump to a centralized station with a series of sensors,” said Beaudoin, manager of operations, energy, and utilities at HSPH. “The sensors in the central station monitor temperature, humidity, small particulate matter, large particulate matter, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and total volatile organic compounds. Based on real-time readings, the system will adjust the ventilation rates in the lab.”When no research is being conducted, it is unnecessary to run air changes at a high rate, so the system decreases airflow. Conversely, when sensors detect a chemical spill, the system ramps up to the maximum number of air changes per hour to flush out the space. With the exception of biosafety level 3 labs (where researchers deal with lethal bacteria and viruses), all labs in the François-Xavier Bagnoud Building have been outfitted with Aircuity systems over the past two years.Other HSPH buildings benefit as well.LED lighting and motion sensors installed throughout HSPH have also resulted in significant electricity savings. In the Kresge Building, high-efficiency LED lights replaced incandescent and fluorescent fixtures in all the offices renovated last summer. On the ninth floor of the building alone, the total number of watts expended per square foot was cut by more than 50 percent.A 43,000-square-foot former schoolhouse at 90 Smith St., renovated to house HSPH administrative offices, is 100 percent LED-lit. Completed in February, the building was designed in compliance with the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) commercial interior guidelines. HSPH also has worked with local utilities to maximize energy efficiency, and learned from the New Buildings Institute’s “core performance guide.” Based on energy modeling, an “advanced building” may perform as much as 45 percent better than code.Beaudoin and other operations personnel often collaborate with student and staff groups on campus. The Environmental Health and Sustainability Club at HSPH, started in 2007, has hosted park cleanups, designed water bottles for first-year students, and organized volunteer events with the Food Project, a Massachusetts urban farming program.“Right now we’re working to create a speaker series about the effect of climate change on health,” said HSPH doctoral student Peter James, one of the club’s founding members and its current president. “For example, changing temperature distributions may lead to increased infectious disease transmission. It’s an emerging area of research.”An HSPH sustainability group, eco-opportunity, holds monthly meetings to discuss sustainability initiatives.“It’s one of the premier models for Green Teams campuswide, as far as having representation from each department in the School and implementing things as a team,” said Longwood sustainability manager Claire Berezowitz, who heads eco-opportunity along with Tiffany Colt, assistant facilities manager at HSPH. “The composting program that started a couple years ago was largely the result of work done by eco-opportunity.”Sebastian’s Café, the HSPH cafeteria, has full composting and recycling and no longer sells bottled water. Led by general manager Laurie Torf, the café was the first Harvard food service facility to earn a Green Restaurant Certification from the Green Restaurant Association of America.This month, eco-opportunity is holding its third “Take the Stairs” competition to encourage walking instead of using the elevator. An online tracking system helps participants follow their progress. In the 2010 competition, students, faculty, and staff collectively climbed 44,396 flights of stairs.“We did Mount Kilimanjaro the first year and Mount McKinley last year,” said Berezowitz. “It’s really gotten the word out about eco-opportunity, and it’s something to engage everyone at the School in sustainability.”last_img read more

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Ogu excited playing for club and country

first_img Ogu is one of the successful Nigerian players to ever play in the Israeli league, winning three successive league titles, the 2017 Israeli Cup as well as lifting the Israeli Super Cup twice with Hapoel Be’er Sheva. Ogu also made 190 Hapoel appearances, scoring 18 goals and providing 10 assists, before he joined Saudi Arabia side Aladalah FC in January. On the International scene, Ogu has two goals in 24 matches for Nigeria and has played in three major tournaments for the country.Advertisement Super Eagles midfielder, John Ogu, is proud of his career and grateful to God for what he has been able to achieve through football. Loading… He played in all three of their group matches at the 2013 Fifa Confederations Cup, he was part of the Super Eagles squad at the 2018 World Cup in Russia and also won a Bronze medal for Nigeria in 2019 African cup of Nations in Egypt. However, despite the lack of opportunities to play for the bigger clubs, Ogu is adamant that his career has been a good one. “I live for this, I work hard to be where I am not to let anyone look down on me”. read also:Covid-19: Ogu appreciates frontline health workers “I believe in myself and am so proud of the career God had chosen for me ”, he said in a social media post with a video of his goals for the Super Eagles. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Promoted ContentBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemTop 10 Tiniest Phones Ever Made8 Addictive And Fun Coffee Facts7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend BetterYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of AnimeWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?World’s Most Delicious Foods2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This Year10 Phones That Can Easily Fit In The Smallest Pocket7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend BetterBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever Made10 Risky Jobs Some Women Dolast_img read more

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Men’s hockey: Young Badgers drop weekend series to No. 12 Notre Dame as power-play struggles continue

first_imgThe University of Wisconsin men’s hockey team (8-10-4, 4-4-4 Big Ten) continued their challenging Big Ten schedule Friday and Sunday as they faced No. 12 Notre Dame (13-8-2, 6-6-1), the third-ranked team in the Big Ten.The Badgers dropped the first competition 6–4 at the Kohl Center, a place they have had considerable success this season, before drawing the second competition 2–2 at the United Center in Chicago. The Irish ultimately secured the extra point in the Big Ten standings Sunday by winning the 3-on-3 overtime period. Despite the results, this young Badger team proved it can keep pace with a top-ranked team as it continues to improve down the stretch.Friday’s game was a competitive one, with the score tied at three entering the final period. The Badgers put together one of their best offensive nights of the season thanks to goals from K’Andre Miller, Will Johnson, Roman Ahcan and Tarek Baker, but fell short due to two Notre Dame goals in the final 13 minutes of regulation.Friday’s game was memorable for goaltender Daniel Lebedeff. Despite allowing six goals to the visiting team, the freshman’s assist to Miller on a UW power-play marked the first assist by a Wisconsin goaltender since Dec. 2012. Miller’s goal added to his team-leading 18 points in only 20 games played.Women’s Hockey: Badgers maintain No. 1 ranking heading into final third of regular seasonThe top-ranked Wisconsin women’s hockey team (20-2-0, 10-2-0 WCHA) fell to the No. 5 ranked Ohio State Buckeyes (15-7-0, 9-5-0) Read…After the game, Head Coach Tony Granato praised the performance of his team.“Sometimes you don’t always get what you deserve,” Granato said. “I think there were parts of the game that we looked like we were in control of it but we just didn’t stay with it enough. That team beat us three times last year in similar games where you felt like you were in control of the game.”Friday’s game marked the first time since Oct. 27 that the Badgers netted multiple power-play goals. Wisconsin has struggled on odd-man advantages this season, so their breakthrough Friday was a positive sign heading into Sunday’s rematch in Chicago.The Badgers got off to a strong start Sunday, scoring two goals in the first period — one coming from sophomore Roman Ahcan with one second left on the clock. After the first period, however, the Badgers were unable to capitalize on offense and ended up drawing the contest 3–3.The Badgers’ power-play struggles continued yet again Sunday — UW failed to capitalize on five power play opportunities, while the Irish netted one power-play goal on just two advantages.Much like Friday, the Badgers came out fresh but were unable to find the back when they needed it most. The Badgers finished with 35 shots on goal — 19 coming in the second period — compared to 30 from the Irish.A look back at the fall semester in Wisconsin sports: Moments we’ll remember, others we’d like to forgetThis fall in University of Wisconsin sports has been filled with plenty of surprises, some pleasant and some not so Read…Despite failing to gain a point in the overtime period, Granato was pleased with how the young Badgers competed against one of the best teams in the country.“Every weekend I’ve been happy with how our team competes, plays and battles,” Granato said. “I see a lot of progress, young players continuing to grow, and there are things to be excited about, so I’m excited about our team.”For the players, it was a memorable experience playing in the United Center, the home of the Chicago Blackhawks. Senior Peter Tischke, a Chicago native, explained how he felt playing on his favorite team’s ice.“It was a surreal experience,” Tischke said. “It is always fun to come here and play in front of family and friends and in the arena of the team I watched growing up. It’s cool to experience the NHL-feel for a day.”The Badgers hope to bounce back this weekend as they travel to Minneapolis to take on the University of Minnesota Friday. Puck drop is scheduled for 7 p.m. for both games.last_img read more

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