Watch The Heavy Pets Trade Out Band Members With Brothers Gow One-By-One During This Awesome Band Transition

first_imgThe Heavy Pets and Brothers Gow just wrapped their combined two-week tour of the West coast, which hit eleven cities from San Deigo to Seattle in twelve days. Across the eleven nights, the performance at The Domino Room in Bend, OR, on January 20th stands out as a tour highlight. To transition from The Heavy Pets’ set to Brothers Gow, both bands coordinated an epic transition, which involved members of Brothers Gow coming out and switching with individual members of The Heavy Pets one at a time until the full line-up of Brothers Gow was on stage and ready to shred. Not holding anything back once their full band was on-stage, Brothers Gow then busted out “Squirrel Jam,” a track which hasn’t been seen live in over three years.You can check out video of the transition between the two bands and Brother Gow’s “Squirrel Jam” below, courtesy of Brothers Gow.If you like what you see, you can catch more of Brothers Gow as support for the West-Coast leg of The Werks’ recently announced tour, dates for which can be found below. Tickets are available via Brothers Gow’s website.last_img read more

Read More »

Extension Academy

first_imgFor more information on UGA Extension’s impact in Georgia, visit extension.uga.edu. Fifteen University of Georgia Cooperative Extension employees graduated this month from the 2018-19 UGA Extension Academy for Professional Excellence — an internal program aimed at developing the next generation of leaders.The program is designed to teach leadership skills to early- and mid-career UGA county Extension agents, state specialists and personnel from the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and College of Family and Consumer Sciences. Ultimately, the training is an effort toward fulfilling UGA Extension’s mission of helping Georgians become healthier, more productive, financially independent and environmentally responsible individuals.Extension Academy participants completed three leadership institutes offering intensive, three-day personal and professional development trainings facilitated by the CAES Office of Learning and Organizational Development (OLOD).Participants in the leadership program have been identified as potential leaders for the organization, or are current leaders, who are interested in enhancing their leadership skills.”Extension Academy is the first tier of leadership-development training for professionals working in UGA Extension and is closely aligned units within our college. This class of graduates look forward to potential leadership opportunities with the organization and will lean on the information and network they gained in this program as they lead,” said Lauren Griffeth, UGA Extension leadership specialist and organizer of the academy.Tripp Williams, UGA Extension county coordinator in Columbia County, says he learned a lot about his management style and how it affects his team through the Extension Academy.“I was able to identify leadership strengths and opportunities for growth to achieve our office goals and my personal career goals,” he said. “I feel the leadership academy is a vital part of continuing education for Extension agents as it equips us to be confident leaders in our offices, communities and state.” Kelle Ashley, the UGA Extension 4-H and youth development agent in Oconee County, applied for Extension Academy because she saw the program as an opportunity to grow professionally.“Extension Academy was a great experience.  After each session, I felt ‘recharged.’ I’d return to my county office with a plan to take on new challenges both professionally and personally,” Ashley said. “This experience was also a great way to connect with colleagues from around the state. Creating this new network of Extension professionals has helped me better appreciate how each one of them brings value to our organization.” The opportunity to receive advanced leadership training in a small setting is what convinced Clark MacAllister, UGA Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources agent in Dawson and Lumpkin counties, to participate in the program.  “I had been in Extension for a few years and I had established a decent reputation in my counties. This allowed me some room to take time for extra trainings,” said MacAllister, who joined UGA Extension seven years ago. “Even though I still feel ‘new’ in some ways, I’ve got to be a good example to the younger Extension agents coming up behind me.”He said the Extension Academy courses helped him learn more about himself with an end goal of helping him better interact with others.“The program makes you look inside and examine your own personality; how you are perceived by others and how you react to stress and conflict,” he said. “I learned how small actions can have big consequences when you are interacting with coworkers. It was uncomfortable at times to discuss my own personality habits, but in understanding these I can now adjust to become a better leader within my office and my community.”After completing Extension Academy, MacAllister says he would recommend the program to other Extension agents who are interested in expanding their leadership skills.                              This year’s Extension Academy participants are:Leigh Anne Aaron, Family and Consumer Sciences agent, Oconee and Morgan countiesKelle Ashley, 4-H agent, Oconee CountyStephanie Benton, 4-H agent, Early CountyPam Bloch, 4-H agent, Gwinnett CountyKasey Bozeman, county Extension coordinator and 4-H agent, Liberty and Long countiesPaul Coote, director, Burton 4-H CenterTim Davis, county Extension coordinator and Agriculture and Natural Resources agent, Chatham CountyClark MacAllister, county Extension coordinator and Agriculture and Natural Resources agent, Dawson and Lumpkin CountiesMerritt Melancon, public relations coordinator, UGA Extension, Office of Communications and Creative ServicesSusan Moore, Family and Consumer Sciences agent, Laurens CountyJustin Shealey, county Extension coordinator and Agriculture and Natural Resources agent, Echols CountyHeather Shultz, 4-H livestock programs coordinator, UGA ExtensionCindee Sweda, Family and Consumer Sciences agent, Spalding CountyTrish West, county Extension coordinator and 4-H agent, Bryan CountyTripp Williams, county Extension coordinator and Agriculture and Natural Resources agent, Columbia Countylast_img read more

Read More »

Women of Troy finish first in opening tournament

first_imgThe members of the No. 2 USC women’s golf team were looking to start strong, but even they didn’t expect this.“This is the first time we’ve ever won the first game of the season,” coach Andrea Gaston said.Lizette Salas | Daily TrojanIn a tournament with eight top-10 teams and terrible conditions, the Women of Troy came away with the victory at the Mason Rudolph Championship at the Vanderbilt Legends Golf Club in Franklin, Tenn. The team finished at 16-under 560 (278-282), two strokes ahead of No. 3 UCLA at 10-under 562.Sophomore Jennifer Song, who had noted in the past that winning an individual tournament was a goal of hers, captured the individual title with a score of 12-under 132 (66-66).“I just had a great game out there,” Song said of her two bogey-free rounds.Song rode a hot putter to her first outright victory of her collegiate career.“The first round I had 26 putts, and the next round I had 27,” she said. “Those putting scores are what I want to have, and they make my score really low.”Junior Lizette Salas recovered from a rough first round to finish tied for 25th at one-under 143 (74-69).“Lizette was disappointed in her first round, but she came back very strong in the second round,” Gaston said.With UCLA closing in on the lead on the back nine of the final round, Salas birdied 17. This, with Song’s closing birdies on 17 and 18 “helped us seal the victory,” according to Gaston.Senior Caroline Kim and sophomore Inah Park tied for 30th at even par 144, with both shooting 74 in the first round and 70 in the second round. For Park, the round of 70 is her lowest in a collegiate tournament.Freshman Cyna Rodriguez, making her USC debut, finished tied for 40th at 1-over 145 (72-73).“Cyna played very well as a freshman,” Gaston said, noting that both of her scores counted towards the team score (the highest individual score is dropped).The team performed despite bad weather, as the course was wet all weekend and Saturday’s second round was cancelled due to rain.“It was really soggy, and our new shoes got really messy. I was upset about that,” Song joked.Despite the conditions, the team was able to put together a very low score without senior All-American Belen Mozo, who is recovering from shoulder surgery.“This tournament helped us to develop the depth we’re going to need to compete this year,” Gaston said.That depth will certainly be necessary given the team’s upcoming schedule. Beginning Oct. 16 at the Stanford Invitational, the team has three back-to-back tournaments.“In between, we’re not going to have too many days to work on things in between,” said Gaston. “The preparation between now and Stanford will really dictate how we close out the fall.”Though the team is pleased with its historic start, the members know that this tournament doesn’t matter when the national championship rolls around.“It’s exciting to start off well, but we’re looking to close well in May,” said Gaston. “Our mindset is that we have to work hard because we have a lot of tough competition coming up.”last_img read more

Read More »