Get a Glimpse of the Glamour Cat! Nicole Scherzinger in London’s Cats

first_imgFirst she was a Pussycat Doll—now she’s the Glamour Cat! Nicole Scherzinger is prowling to the West End in the new revival of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Cats. UK’s Daily Mail released some sizzling photos of the new star sporting a short, sleek Grizabella wig, a chic fur coat and fur-covered fingerless gloves. Ready to see the new revival? Catch the limited engagement of Cats from December 6 through February 28, 2015 at the London Palladium, with opening night scheduled for December 11. Meow! View Commentslast_img

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IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing National Point Standings Through March 23

first_imgIMCA Modifieds – 1. Brian Schultz, Casa Grande, Ariz., 460; 2. Chaz Baca, Mesa, Ariz., and Cody Laney, Torrance, Calif., both 424; 4. Spencer Wilson, Queen Creek, Ariz., 411; 5. John Par­meley, Phoenix, Ariz., 368; 6. William Gould, Calera, Okla., 345; 7. Kelsie Foley, Tucson, Ariz., 343; 8. Scott Sluka, Casa Grande, Ariz., 334; 9. Ethan Dotson, Bakersfield, Calif., 332; 10. Hunter Mar­riott, Brookfield, Mo., 301; 11. Jeremy Thornton, Tucson, Ariz., 300; 12. Matt Guillaume, Has­let, Texas, 288; 13. Marlyn Seidler, Underwood, N.D., 285; 14. Josh McGaha, Abilene, Texas, 282; 15. Tim Ward, Chandler, Ariz., 275; 16. Austin Kuehl, Cave Creek, Ariz., 274; 17. Bryson Curry, Laveen, Ariz., 272; 18. Dean Abbey, Roanoke, Texas, 265; 19. Ryan Roath, Peoria, Ariz., 254; 20. Garth Dushanek, Avondale, Ariz., 243.IMCA RaceSaver Sprint Cars – 1. Marcus Thomas, Corsicana, Texas, 156; 2. Robert Vetter, Wolfe City, Texas, 134; 3. John Ricketts, Burleson, Texas, 114; 4. Austin Mundie, Dallas, Texas, 108; 5. Josh Hawkins, Whitehouse, Texas, 99; 6. Chip Graham, Lewisville, Texas, 94; 7. D.J. Es­tes Jr., Mansfield, Texas, 87; 8. Johnny Brown, Orange, Texas, 81; 9. Joshua McCord, Bossier City, La., 79; 10. Kyle Jones, Kennedale, Texas, 77; 11. Tyler Russell, Abbott, Texas, 75; 12. Tucker Doughty, Heath, Texas, 74; 13. Chad Wilson, North Richland Hills, Texas, 72; 14. Jeb Sessums, Burleson, Texas, 71; 15. Michelle Melton, Flower Mound, Texas, 70; 16. Jacob Harris, Vidor, Texas, 65; 17. Josh Toho, Hinton, Okla., Bryan Bolden, Quinlan, Texas, and Michael Day, Greenville, Texas, each 60; 20. Andy Shouse, Mustang, Okla., 59.IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars – 1. George Fronsman, Surprise, Ariz., 564; 2. Steve Kihle, Williston, N.D., 420; 3. Cody Center, Mesa, Ariz., 390; 4. Race Fisher, Dove Creek, Colo., 384; 5. Manny Baldiviez, Yuma, Ariz., 366; 6. Aaron Spangler, Dove Creek, Colo., 353; 7. Kirk Martin, Weather­ford, Texas, 346; 8. Tony Hill, Cortez, Colo., 336; 9. Elijah Zevenbergen, Ocheyedan, Iowa, 285; 10. Westin Abbey, Comanche, Texas, 263; 11. Troy Jerovetz, Green Bay, Wis., and April Phillips, Abi­lene, Texas, both 246; 13. Joe Haines, Yuma, Ariz., 243; 14. Thomas Daffern, Brawley, Calif., 237; 15. Jason Rogers, Selden, Kan., 232; 16. Jody York, Lubbock, Texas, 225; 17. Brendon LaBatte, Weyburn, Sask., 212; 18. Damon Hammond, Burleson, Texas, 211; 19. Andrew Alten­burg, Truman, Minn., 204; 20. Tommy Phillips, Abilene, Texas, 197. IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks – 1. Merle Zachrison, Surprise, Ariz., 340; 2. Dean Zachrison, Sur­prise, Ariz., 329; 3. Jim Robinson, Yuma, Ariz., 290; 4. Jason Beshears, Somerton, Ariz., 286; 5. Jay Crowe, Surprise, Ariz., 253; 6. Joe Vlasity, Glendale, Ariz., 219; 7. John Barron, Phoenix, Ariz., 195; 8. Joseph Peterson, Mesa, Ariz., 187; 9. Scott Shaw, Red Deer, Alb., 185; 10. Brent Wofford, Yuma, Ariz., 180; 11. Craig Ebers, Yuma, Ariz., 178; 12. Damian Snyder, Copperas Cove, Texas, 177; 13. David Kendall, Peoria, Ariz., 169; 14. Wesley Warren, Fairfield, Texas, 168; 15. Mike Erwin, Yuma, Ariz., 166; 16. Gerald Spalding Jr., Abilene, Texas, 157; 17. Scott Jeffery, Yuma, Ariz., 152; 18. Joshua Cordova, Somerton, Ariz., 148; 19. Kyle Cardinal, Paradise Valley, Ariz., 140; 20. Ashley Hunt, Yuma, Ariz., 138. Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMods – 1. Jason George, Laveen, Ariz., 603; 2. Dennis Gates, Claypool, Ariz., 454; 3. Miles Morris, Yuma, Ariz., 353; 4. Dale Kunz, Buckeye, Ariz., 334; 5. Aus­tin Kiefer, Pahrump, Nev., 332; 6. Kyle Smith, Yuma, Ariz., 329; 7. Chris Toth, Holtville, Calif., 311; 8. Kenny Wyman Jr., Avondale, Ariz., 299; 9. Dale Irby, Buckeye, Ariz., 293; 10. Mark Ma­drid, Phoenix, Ariz., 283; 11. Adolfo Noriega, Yuma, Ariz., 267; 12. Ron Poe, Phoenix, Ariz., 264; 13. Tom Wyman, Laveen, Ariz., 239; 14. Mike Tanner, Smithville, Mo., 236; 15. James Dupre, Yuma, Ariz., 224; 16. David Harrington, Peoria, Ariz., 217; 17. Chris Caldwell, Avondale, Ariz., 211; 18. Corey Clayton, El Centro, Calif., 195; 19. Joe Webb, Yuma, Ariz., 194; 20. Joshua Cor­dova, Somerton, Ariz., 192. Scoggin-Dickey Parts Center Southern SportMods – 1. Jeffrey Abbey, Comanche, Texas, 378; 2. James Hanusch, Belton, Texas, 348; 3. James Skinner, Burleson, Texas, 320; 4. Allen Montgomery, White Settlement, Texas, 284; 5. Gabe Tucker, Carbon, Texas, 243; 6. Jake Up­church, Grand Prairie, Texas, 223; 7. Cory Williams, Slaton, Texas, 204; 8. James Guyton, Moody, Texas, 172; 9. Ronnie Bell, Lorena, Texas, 165; 10. Nathan Buchanan, Kemp, Texas, 162; 11. Dustin Robinson, Post, Texas, 161; 12. Taylor Florio, Copperas Cove, Texas, 151; 13. Justin Nabors, Kemp, Texas, Sid Kiphen, Gatesville, Texas, and Jeff Toler, Decatur, Texas, each 145; 16. Don Painter, Austin, Texas, 136; 17. Justin Long, Haslet, Texas, and Justin Shaw, Sweetwa­ter, Texas, both 135; 19. Kamera McDonald, Keller, Texas, and Ronnie Allison, Dallas, Texas, both 133.Mach-1 Sport Compacts – 1. Julia Childs, Weatherford, Texas, 151; 2. Danny Baggerly, Rio Vista, Texas, 146; 3. Dakota Dees, Weatherford, Texas, 136; 4. Mike Jacobs, Weatherford, Texas, 112; 5. Robert Rutledge, Azle, Texas, 103; 6. Carl Boatright, Azle, Texas, 91; 7. Dillon Richards, Beatrice, Neb., 77; 8. Steve Holloway, Azle, Texas, and Jake Newsom, Sioux City, Iowa, both 75; 10. Drake Bohlmeyer, Beatrice, Neb., 69; 11. James Morehead, Cleburne, Texas, 66; 12. Brooke Fluckiger, Columbus, Neb., 65; 13. Kyle Owen, Nebraska City, Neb., 64; 14. David Nor­quest, York, Neb., 62; 15. Bryan Vannausdle, Nebraska City, Neb., 47; 16. Justin Brown, Be­atrice, Neb., 42; 17. Shawn Hein, Beatrice, Neb., 39; 18. Cole Krichau, Lincoln, Neb., Matthew Barnard, Weatherford, Texas, and Dustin Brethouwer, Beatrice, Neb., each 36.last_img read more

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Run. Hide. Fight. Reflect: The effects of trauma after tragedy

first_imgPhoto by Katie ChinIt was an ordinary Monday afternoon for Cindy Shiu: Her finance class was canceled, and she was ready to start on homework on the fourth floor of Fertitta Hall. Leaving the restroom, she opened the door to a group of policemen in bulletproof vests, holding guns pointed in all directions.“A shot of adrenaline I’ve never felt before rushed through my body,” Shiu said. “I bolted down those four flights of stairs.”Less than one day after the Las Vegas massacre, an adjunct professor in the Marshall School of Business started her 12 p.m. class. Students in the class say she was visibly distraught and was talking about friends who were the city when the shooting took place, leaving 58 dead and 489 injured. Five minutes into class, she falsely claimed there was an active shooter on campus and left the classroom.Minutes later, public safety officers and police arrived on the scene, ordering students to evacuate. Hundreds of students fled Fertitta Hall, seeking shelter in nearby buildings. Shiu, a junior majoring in business administration, was one of them.In the aftermath of any episode of mass violence, terrorist attack or natural disaster, individuals touched directly or indirectly are at a higher risk of displaying traumatic stress reactions, according to the National Center for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. According to the center, traumatic stress reactions manifest in four main categories: emotional, cognitive, physical and interpersonal effects.“Most of these issues occur across a developmental spectrum, they just present themselves differently,” said David Schonfeld, a professor of practice, social work and pediatrics at the USC Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work.Some symptoms include shock, terror, irritability, blame, anger, guilt, grief, emotional numbing, sleep disorders and helplessness, he said. Individuals may display one, many or none of these symptoms.“Sometimes you don’t see the signs,” Schonfeld said. “Sometimes it’s just based [on] experience and exposure, especially if you’re talking about internal states. The person feels it though.”From a student perspective, Shiu believes the University could have responded to the false reports more quickly with available USC mental health resources and given students extra time to process the stressful situation last Monday.“I felt like they should have clearly emphasized mental health services for students and have every professor mention [the false report] briefly,” Shiu said. “I know students who carried on with their midterms at 2 p.m., and that’s not OK.”Provost Michael Quick issued a statement around 4 p.m. the Monday of the incident, three hours after the Los Angeles Police Department confirmed there was no active shooter. Immediately after the lockdown was lifted, classes resumed as scheduled, unless a professor decided otherwise.A specialist in pediatric bereavement and crisis and the director for the National Center for School Crisis and Bereavement, Schonfeld and his team work with schools across the country to educate and support those experiencing trauma. In educational institutions, a common symptom following a traumatic event is lack of focus and unproductiveness among students, faculty and staff.“Kids have trouble learning in school, teachers have trouble concentrating and teaching,” Schonfeld said. “This leads to deterioration in academic and work performance.”Damon Clark, a trauma surgeon at Keck Hospital of USC, noted that the healing process for trauma patients is long. It also requires a multidisciplinary team of professionals working together to mentally and physically heal those affected.“There’s pain associated to whatever extent their injuries are plus surgical procedures required to treat that injury,” Clark said. “When we have a typical trauma patient from a violent act, we get social work, counselors fairly involved because a lot of them deal with the pain, anxiety, depression.”Clark believes that the mental aspect is often overlooked in the public.“In terms of some of the research we do in interpersonal violence, it takes time and a lot of effort to heal from wounds,” Clark said. “But I think one of the major aspects that people forget is the emotional state that people go through. People don’t forget going through that kind of event.”After evaluations, Clark and his team work with social workers and police to identify next of kin and support those close to the victims. He also continues to brief relatives and close friends of the patient’s status.“The key thing when you’re dealing with this is to have conversations about the patient’s physical and emotional health as often as possible,” Clark said. “You need to be honest about how they’re doing and describe as much of the process as you can.”To support fellow Trojans experiencing distress after a major event, Schonfeld recommends friends and classmates to reach out and cheer them up. Though people may feel worried of upsetting someone further, he believes it helps the individual be more open.“They can withdraw and feel alienated,” Schonfeld said. “The problem is a lot of the time people don’t know what to say and they figure, ‘If I ask about it, it’s going to upset them.’ You’re not upsetting them, you’re just inviting them to share their feelings, so that hopefully you can support them.”Doctors, social workers and other medical professionals in the USC community are also available.“We don’t think you can live your life worrying about an incident that may or may not happen, but if there is, we’re here for the community,” Clark said. “We’ll support you physically, emotionally and psychologically — whatever is needed.”last_img read more

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Wawrinka through to last four Down Under

first_imgShe defeated Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova in straight sets overnight to book her place in the last four. He defeated Jo Wilfred Tsonga in straight sets and could now face Roger Federer for a place in the final.The former world number one takes on Mischa Zverev in his quarter-final later this morning.Earlier Venus Williams qualified for the women’s semi-finals for the first time in 14 years.last_img

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Russia 2018: Russia Thumps Saudi Arabia 5-0

first_imgRussia’s Yuri Gazinsky header has gone into the record books as the first goal of Russia 2018 FIFA World Cup, as the World Cup hosts thumped Saudi Arabia 5-0 in the opening match of the tournament in Moscow on Thursday.Gazinsky scored after 12 minutes and Denis Cheryshev, who netted a brace, added a second before the break after coming on as an injury replacement for Alan Dzagoev.Artem Dzuyba netted a third before terrific late efforts from Cheryshev and Aleksandr Golovin wrapped up Russia’s first win since October to launch their Group A campaign in style. Russia headed into the curtain-raiser at the 80,000-capacity Luzhniki, the crucible of Russian and Soviet sport, without a victory in over eight months and ranked a lowly 70th in the world.For Saudi Arabia it was a return to the global showpiece for the first time in 12 years, with their only previous finals wins at the 1994 World Cup.Only South Africa, in 2010, have failed to advance from the group stage as the host nation and a seven-match winless run had ramped up the pressure on Stanislav Cherchesov’s side.A lack of an attacking threat in recent outings was a primary concern for Russia going into a group campaign in which they will also face Egypt and Uruguay.Those fears were soon washed away, at least for the time being, as Alexander Samedov and Fedor Smolov carved out early chances only to be denied by desperate sliding blocks.The opening goal came soon after, as Saudi Arabia failed to clear a corner and a curling cross in from the left by Golovin picked out an unmarked Gazinsky to head low into the far corner.It was a goal that prompted Russian President Vladimir Putin to turn to the Saudi crown prince Mohammed bin Salman, seated alongside FIFA chief Gianni Infantino and shake his hand.Russia lost Dzagoev to a hamstring injury midway through the first half, the CSKA Moscow midfielder clutching his hamstring as he crumpled to the turf.But his replacement, former Real Madrid winger Cheryshev, celebrated his recent recall to the national side with Russia’s second goal two minutes before half-time.Cheryshev was still left with plenty of work to do inside the area after a pass from Roman Zobnin, brilliantly flicking the ball past two closing defenders before rifling into the roof of the net.Saudi briefly threatened early in the second half when an inviting cross in from the right skipped just beyond the reach of Taiseer Al-Jassam.Russia then nearly grabbed a third when Abdullah Al-Muaiouf spilled a low drive from Roman Zobnin, the Saudi goalkeeper recovering just time in time to nudge the ball away from Smolov.The forward was soon replaced by Dzyuba, who struck almost immediately by heading another Golovin cross beyond a helpless Muaiouf in the 71st minute.Cheryshev hammered in a fourth with the outside of his left in stoppage time and Golovin capped a magnificent performance by bending in a last-gasp free-kick.Russia meet Egypt in their next match on June 19 in Saint Petersburg, while Saudi Arabia will look to rebound against group favourites Uruguay a day later.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

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Ghana coach Appiah: Well done Nigeria & Keshi

first_imgThe Black Stars coach has congratulated Stephen Keshi and the Super Eagles on their fifth World Cup qualification after beating Ethiopia in a 4-1 aggregate play-off win.Ghana coach Kwesi Appiah has patted his Nigerian colleague Stephen Keshi on the back for guiding the Super Eagles to book a 2014 World Cup ticket.Nigeria would be making their fifth World Cup appearance at Brazil 2014 after a 2-0 victory over Ethiopia (4-1 aggregate play-off win) on Saturday. They were the first African side to pick a slot before Ivory Coast and Cameroon.”Congratulations to them [Nigeria]. They have done well,” Appiah said. “He’s my friend, [Stephen] Keshi. We have always been in touch and I am really happy for them. We have become very close friends and we talk on so many issues.”The Black Stars will face off with Egypt on Tuesday in the return leg after a 6-1 first-leg victory.Appiah said Ghana would not be complacent in Cairo. “Egypt has got a very good team, no doubt about that. Even though we won, we are not going to get it easy. We are not going to sit back. We will try and get a win,” Appiah added.last_img read more

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