Oleg Grabar

first_imgThe Islamic art and architecture community mourned the loss of one of the field’s most influential and insightful scholars. Oleg Grabar, professor emeritus of the School of Historical Studies at the Institute for Advanced Study, and Aga Khan Professor, Emeritus, at Harvard University, passed away at his home in Princeton, New Jersey, on January 8, 2011, at the age of eighty-one. Professor Grabar, who taught in the Harvard Department of Fine Arts (now History of Art and Architecture) for twenty-one years (1969–1990), was instrumental in founding Harvard’s Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture. There are few, if any, Islamicists who have not profited from the scholarly contributions of this extraordinary man, who was larger-than-life. He was the first Aga Khan Professor of Islamic Art at Harvard (1980–1990), and subsequently joined the faculty of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, where he remained active in research and publication until his second retirement in 1998, and over the following thirteen years as well. Grabar’s continuing post-retirement intellectual productivity and capacity to inspire were officially recognized when he received the Chairman’s Award from the Aga Khan Award for Architecture in Doha in 2010.Oleg Grabar was born in Strasbourg, France, in 1929. As the son of André Grabar, the eminent historian of Byzantine art, he was raised almost from the cradle to be an art historian. Thanks to that upbringing, he harbored a special fascination with the Byzantine and late antique heritage of the Mediterranean world. This fascination extended to his explorations of early Islamic art at the beginning of his career, with seventh- to eighth-century Umayyad architecture forming the core of his scholarship, even when it broadened later on to embrace a much wider spectrum.Grabar’s early education in France was followed by an A.B. magna cum laude in Medieval History from Harvard University in 1950. He continued his higher education at Princeton University, where he began to develop a passion for Islamic art, obtaining his M.A. (1953) and Ph.D. (1955) in Oriental Languages and Literatures and the History of Art.In 1969, Grabar joined the Harvard faculty as Professor of Fine Arts and was the first ever to teach Islamic art at the University. Always generous to students and colleagues, he was also a thoughtful faculty member of the Center for Middle Eastern Studies. His wide-ranging and substantial knowledge of the Middle East — not only its art and architecture but also its peoples, cultures, and history — gave him a magisterial perspective on possibilities for lecturers, projects, and thematic emphases for Center programs. As a teacher, he would mesmerize students with his flamboyant, exciting, and always substantive lectures. His remarkable charisma derived largely from his contagious enthusiasm for challenging intellectual problems and for the subject matter and questions he was addressing at any given time.Grabar wrote more than 20 books and 120 articles. He was primarily a medievalist, but his publications covered a wide range of subjects, including early Islamic architecture, the architecture of Jerusalem under Islamic rule, Arabic and Persian painting, and Islamic ornament. Among his best-known books are “The Formation of Islamic Art” (1973), “The Illustrations of the Maqamat” (1984), “The Art and Architecture of Islam 650–1250” (co-authored with Richard Ettinghausen, 1987), and “The Shape of the Holy: Early Islamic Jerusalem” (1996).Grabar’s seminal work, “The Formation of Islamic Art,” is perhaps the masterpiece among his innumerable publications and remains a classic. This sophisticated and inspired work grew from his early studies on the origins of Islamic art. In one obituary, it was judged “more a work of cultural than art history,” springing as it does “from a deeper familiarity with the thought-world of early medieval Islam than any of today’s Islamic art historians possess,” and revealing that he was “more interested in ideas and context than in the close-focus study of surface detail or indeed the objects themselves as works of art.” Grabar prided himself precisely on this methodological approach. He succinctly distinguished his approach from that of Professor Ettinghausen — a contemporary luminary in the field, whom he admired and collaborated with in the preparation of their highly influential survey of Islamic art and architecture — in the advice he gave to one prospective graduate student: “If you wish to start with ideas and then choose relevant objects, come here to Harvard; but you should go to the Institute of Fine Arts if you prefer to move from objects to ideas.”The global reach of Grabar’s scholarly achievements had an impact not only on his own field but far beyond as well. He had a very special talent for making Islamic art and architecture seductive to nonspecialists, thereby vastly broadening the recognition of the field. He boldly posed sweeping questions about the nature, meaning, and dynamics of Islamic art at a time when very little was known about this subject. In addition to cultivating world-class advanced scholarship and research in the field of Islamic art, he asked questions that often challenged Euro-American perspectives more generally.Grabar’s creative approaches made the field appear wide open to hugely exciting questions of cultural and social history and aesthetics, captivating the minds of generations of scholars and amateurs alike. His mental agility and nondogmatic flexibility made him an extraordinarily inspiring mentor. He would encourage graduate students to work on entirely unexplored subjects because he was deeply concerned about shaping the parameters of a field whose rapid expansion both pleased and worried him.Grabar trained scores of students, many of whom went on to become leading scholars, educators, and curators around the world, particularly in the United States. He brought passion and vision to his work, and his expansive personality, generosity of spirit, collegiality, conviviality, and humor were truly infectious.  Grabar’s resounding impact on expanding the scope of the Islamic field far beyond its former spatial and temporal limits will be his lasting legacy.Oleg Grabar is greatly missed and the field will not be the same without him.Respectfully submitted,William GrahamThomas LentzDavid RoxburghGülru Necipoğlu, Chairlast_img read more

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Extension Academy

first_imgFor more information on UGA Extension’s impact in Georgia, visit extension.uga.edu. Fifteen University of Georgia Cooperative Extension employees graduated this month from the 2018-19 UGA Extension Academy for Professional Excellence — an internal program aimed at developing the next generation of leaders.The program is designed to teach leadership skills to early- and mid-career UGA county Extension agents, state specialists and personnel from the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and College of Family and Consumer Sciences. Ultimately, the training is an effort toward fulfilling UGA Extension’s mission of helping Georgians become healthier, more productive, financially independent and environmentally responsible individuals.Extension Academy participants completed three leadership institutes offering intensive, three-day personal and professional development trainings facilitated by the CAES Office of Learning and Organizational Development (OLOD).Participants in the leadership program have been identified as potential leaders for the organization, or are current leaders, who are interested in enhancing their leadership skills.”Extension Academy is the first tier of leadership-development training for professionals working in UGA Extension and is closely aligned units within our college. This class of graduates look forward to potential leadership opportunities with the organization and will lean on the information and network they gained in this program as they lead,” said Lauren Griffeth, UGA Extension leadership specialist and organizer of the academy.Tripp Williams, UGA Extension county coordinator in Columbia County, says he learned a lot about his management style and how it affects his team through the Extension Academy.“I was able to identify leadership strengths and opportunities for growth to achieve our office goals and my personal career goals,” he said. “I feel the leadership academy is a vital part of continuing education for Extension agents as it equips us to be confident leaders in our offices, communities and state.” Kelle Ashley, the UGA Extension 4-H and youth development agent in Oconee County, applied for Extension Academy because she saw the program as an opportunity to grow professionally.“Extension Academy was a great experience.  After each session, I felt ‘recharged.’ I’d return to my county office with a plan to take on new challenges both professionally and personally,” Ashley said. “This experience was also a great way to connect with colleagues from around the state. Creating this new network of Extension professionals has helped me better appreciate how each one of them brings value to our organization.” The opportunity to receive advanced leadership training in a small setting is what convinced Clark MacAllister, UGA Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources agent in Dawson and Lumpkin counties, to participate in the program.  “I had been in Extension for a few years and I had established a decent reputation in my counties. This allowed me some room to take time for extra trainings,” said MacAllister, who joined UGA Extension seven years ago. “Even though I still feel ‘new’ in some ways, I’ve got to be a good example to the younger Extension agents coming up behind me.”He said the Extension Academy courses helped him learn more about himself with an end goal of helping him better interact with others.“The program makes you look inside and examine your own personality; how you are perceived by others and how you react to stress and conflict,” he said. “I learned how small actions can have big consequences when you are interacting with coworkers. It was uncomfortable at times to discuss my own personality habits, but in understanding these I can now adjust to become a better leader within my office and my community.”After completing Extension Academy, MacAllister says he would recommend the program to other Extension agents who are interested in expanding their leadership skills.                              This year’s Extension Academy participants are:Leigh Anne Aaron, Family and Consumer Sciences agent, Oconee and Morgan countiesKelle Ashley, 4-H agent, Oconee CountyStephanie Benton, 4-H agent, Early CountyPam Bloch, 4-H agent, Gwinnett CountyKasey Bozeman, county Extension coordinator and 4-H agent, Liberty and Long countiesPaul Coote, director, Burton 4-H CenterTim Davis, county Extension coordinator and Agriculture and Natural Resources agent, Chatham CountyClark MacAllister, county Extension coordinator and Agriculture and Natural Resources agent, Dawson and Lumpkin CountiesMerritt Melancon, public relations coordinator, UGA Extension, Office of Communications and Creative ServicesSusan Moore, Family and Consumer Sciences agent, Laurens CountyJustin Shealey, county Extension coordinator and Agriculture and Natural Resources agent, Echols CountyHeather Shultz, 4-H livestock programs coordinator, UGA ExtensionCindee Sweda, Family and Consumer Sciences agent, Spalding CountyTrish West, county Extension coordinator and 4-H agent, Bryan CountyTripp Williams, county Extension coordinator and Agriculture and Natural Resources agent, Columbia Countylast_img read more

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Saint Leo Attack Too Much for West Florida

first_img Sept. 2, 2007 Box Score  SAINT LEO, Fla. – In a rematch of last season’s NCAA Division II Regional Semifinal match that ended with the Argonauts winning in a shootout, West Florida (1-2-0) was unable to overcome a late second half goal and fell to Saint Leo (2-1-0) 2-1 Sunday afternoon at University Field on the Saint Leo campus.Following a two hour delay due to lightning in the area, the teams battled in the midfield for the first fifteen before the Lions were able to crack the score board at the 28th minute of the first half. A pair of thru balls opened a lane for Chrissy Darwell, leaving her with a one-on-one opportunity, against the Argonauts goal keeper Courtney Jones (So. / Panama City, Fla.).West Florida tied the match 12 minutes into the second half, when Lura Carter (Jr. / Tallahassee, Fla.) sent the ball into the box on a set play and Jodi Galucci (So. / Stuart, Fla.) finished the opportunity netting her first goal of the season.The Lions answered back at the 72:10 mark of the match. Bridgett Godwin ran the ball down in the corner and sent a cross to Sara Macko who settled it and put away the eventual game winner.”They got an early goal and had a lot of momentum with their fans there,” said head coach Joe Bartlinski. “We battled back and were able to equalize but made some mistakes due to our youth.”It was good to see us battled back the way we did, but we need just a bit more soccer maturity to break though for better results. They are going to have to learn and on a faster curve then most young player get.”It was Saint Leo’s first victory over West Florida in eight all-time meetings. Up next for the Argonauts is a weekend road trip to Rollins and Florida Southern. On Friday they take on the Tars at 5 p.m. CT and the Moccasin at 1 p.m. CT. Fans can follow the action with “Live Stats” at goargos.com on the Women’s Soccer home page. Print Friendly Version Share Saint Leo Attack Too Much for West Floridalast_img read more

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What channel is Ravens vs. Titans on today? Time, TV schedule for NFL divisional playoff game

first_imgNFL playoff schedule: Divisional roundBelow is the full NFL divisional playoff schedule for 2020, complete with TV channels and live stream links.Saturday, Jan. 11MatchupStart timeTV channelLive streamVikings at 49ers4:35 p.m. ETNBCYahoo!Titans at Ravens8:15 p.m. ETCBSYahoo!Sunday, Jan. 12MatchupStart timeTV channelLive streamTexans at Chiefs3:05 p.m. ETCBSYahoo!Seahawks at Packers6:40 p.m. ETFoxYahoo! The NFL playoff schedule for 2020 brings a unique set of national TV broadcasts, with three networks and the associated TV channels presenting four games over the span of two days in the divisional round. Today’s Ravens vs. Titans game in Baltimore, scheduled to kick off at 8:15 p.m. ET, will be shown on CBS.The Ravens, who earned the No. 1 seed in the AFC and enjoyed a first-round bye last week while the Titans pulled off their upset over the Patriots, led the NFL with 3,296 rushing yards in the regular season, the most by a team in a single season in NFL history. Tennessee, though, ranked third in the league with 2,223 rushing yards in 2019, led by the NFL’s leading rusher Derrick Henry, who rushed for 1,540 yards this season. This marks the fourth time the team with the top rushing offense has met the team with the league’s leading rusher in the postseason in the Super Bowl era. In each of the matchups, the team with the league’s leading rusher has won.RAVENS vs. TITANS PICKS:Against the spread | Straight-up predictionsThat would be a massive upset, of course, considering the Ravens are 10-point home favorites over the Titans. Powered by Sporting News’ Offensive Player of the Year in quarterback Lamar Jackson, Baltimore easily led the league with 33.2 point per game this season and has a league-high 12 players named to the Pro Bowl.Below is all the info you need to watch Ravens vs. Titans on Saturday night, including the TV channel and kickoff time.MORE: Full betting preview for Ravens vs. TitansWhat channel is Ravens vs. Titans on today?TV channel (national): CBSTV channel (Baltimore): WJZTV channel (Nashville): WTVFLive stream: Yahoo! | DAZN (in CA)Sunday’s Ravens vs. Titans game on CBS will be called by the network’s No. X crew. That means xxx and xxx will be on the call. xxx and xxx will report from the sidelines, and xxx NFL rules analyst xxx will explain officiating rulings.For those who can’t watch Ravens vs. Titans on TV and wish to find the game on the radio, the Tennessee call can be heard on Sirius channel 82 and XM channel 226, and the Baltimore call can be heard on Sirius channel 83 and XM channel 225.MORE: Watch every NFL game and RedZone on DAZN (Canada only)What time does Ravens vs. Titans start?Date: Saturday, Jan. 11Start time: 8:15 p.m. ETIn both our picks against the spread and our straight-up predictions for the divisional round of the playoffs, Sporting News is projecting a Ravens win over the Titans. Below are the explanations.Against the spread: The Titans’ game plan is evident: Run Derrick Henry as hard and as much as possible to wear down the Ravens’ defense, finish drives, work the clock and keep Lamar Jackson off the field. The problem is, the Ravens are capable of flipping that script with Jackson and Mark Ingram to limit the opportunities for Henry and Ryan Tannehill. Jackson will force the Titans into uncomfortable situations with his running. Baltimore’s offensive line will win the battle against Tennessee’s front to facilitate everything, including downfield shots to wide receiver Marquise Brown and tight end Mark Andrews.The Ravens will contain Henry and force Tannehill to throw more one-dimensionally than he would like against a deep secondary, inside and out. The Ravens, who will protect both their QB and the ball, have dominated too much through 12 straight victories to trip up at home against the No. 6 seed.Pick: Ravens win 30-17 and cover the spread.Straight up: This is an unstoppable rushing force against the most unstoppable rushing force the NFL has ever seen. Yes, the Titans are benefiting from the fact that Derrick Henry finally is being supported by a legitimate passing attack, which is why Tennessee finished the regular season with the league’s third-best rushing offense and used it to upset New England in the wild-card round. But the Ravens, who scored at least 40 points in five different games this season, led the league with 3,296 rushing yards and surpassed the 1978 Patriots (3,165) for the most rushing yards by a team in a single season in NFL history.With all due respect to Ryan Tannehill, who led the NFL in passer rating this season, the key to this game is related to the other quarterback. Keep in mind Lamar Jackson, who easily broke Michael Vick’s single-season QB rushing record, also led the league with 36 touchdown passes. The soon-to-be MVP and the dangerous weapons around him form a nightmare matchup for any team, and while Tennessee’s defense is respectable, it won’t be up to the task in Baltimore.Pick: Ravens 30, Titans 17MORE: Playoff predictions through Super Bowl 54last_img read more

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