Continuous process

first_imgA visit to an industrial bakery in Britain will usually reveal that its processing lines are continuous, from the make-up plant through to packaging. However, it is not often that you encounter a continuous or fully automated batch mixing system, although there are rare exceptions.With plant bakers increasingly striving for a seamless highly efficient production process, it is surprising that more have not fully automated the dough mixing process. Increasing numbers, however, are beginning to evaluate continuous and carousel mixing systems for new plant or when refurbishing or replacing lines.When doughs are mixed correctly, downstream processing should, all being equal, proceed smoothly. Make a mistake during the mixing phase and you can end up with issues to deal with all down the line.Continuous automated mixing can improve the consistency of doughs – everything from stiff to highly developed – by helping to eradicate those variables caused by human error. By delivering continuously consistent dough, the dividers, sheeters, moulders, ovens and other plant elements can operate at their full potential without adjustments having to be constantly made. The result is a consistently produced quality product.Moreover, with the built-in metering systems now available, any error is indicated and the opportunity to correct the problem – such as an ingredients error – is available before the dough goes down the line.In a batch manual mixing system, the error may not be found until quality control tests are carried out at the end of the line, wasting valuable time and probably a lot of product.Over recent years, a number of major producers have installed continuous automated mixing systems and this has focused the attention of the industry on continuous and carousel mixing and why bread, morning goods and savoury manufacturers have gone down this route.So what are the other advantages of continuous automated mixing? Stewart Morris, a director of Epsom-based European Process Plant says that labour issues have always been top of the agenda. “Recruiting, training and retaining skilled labour remains a challenge and training is a thorny issue,” he says. “If a new, partly trained employee makes a mistake, the results can be costly. Even when fully trained staff change shift or take their holiday, maintaining a process in which skilled workers play a key role, it can be very hard to guarantee product consistency over a period of time.”Dough as neededMorris admits that many bakers can initially feel uneasy because they are used to seeing a large amount of dough being prepared for processing, whereas with continuous mixing they only get it when they need it. But he says that, in his experience, they soon get used to it. He also points out the benefits of this when there is a problem with a downstream piece of equipment.EPP installs and maintains VMI carousel systems both rotary and in-line. This automated system comprises a loading station, one to six stations mounted on feet, a bowl elevator and a dough conveyor. A dough resting station can be added if required. The bowl passes from one station to the next by rotating around a motorised circle. The system can handle up to 6,000kg of dough an hour and is available with fork, single or double spiral mixersThe VMI in-line carousel combines a number of stations: dosing, mixing, dough transfer and resting and can automatically sequence the recipes. It is guided by an integrated process control system.EPP also offers the VMI Verymix continuous mixer. The whole process – from gravimetric dosing through pre-mixing to final mixing – is run continuously. The Verymix guarantees dough of even consistency, says the company, and problems of scrap dough, variations in mixing, resting and fermented doughs can be avoided.In the Verymix system, the mixing rotor can be adapted and the shape of the bowl designed for continuous mixing. Flexible and high-precision dosing with pieces of fat or liquid fat, scraps, special flours, eggs, dried or candied fruit and chocolate chips is straightforward, adds the firm. A triple- jacketed mixing bowl with liquid cooling to regulate the dough temperature with glycol ensures dough consistency and means a wide mix of doughs from 8?C to 30?C in capacities up to 8,000kg can be produced.Morris concludes: “Installing a continuous mixing system is not as radical as many bakers may first think. All you are doing is bringing what is happening downstream back to the mixing. And the benefits can be huge.”last_img read more

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PREMIUMStart-up giants race to digitize ‘warung’

first_imgTopics : Homegrown start-up giants are tapping into the underserved sector of warung (kiosks or mom-and-pop shop), as the COVID-19 pandemic accelerates the digitalization of small and medium enterprises (SMEs).In a country where small businesses account for more than 60 percent of the economy, a warung is the nearest retail spot for many people to make small purchases of snacks or household supplies.Indonesian unicorn Gojek is the latest player to enter the race, with the September launch of GoToko, an online business-to-business (B2B) platform that allows small retailers to directly access brand principles, give product recommendations and use Gojek to receive stock shipments, among other things.“We want brands to come on board with us to better cater to the underserved, as it is sometimes difficult to distribute goods to warung,” GoToko CEO and presid… Forgot Password ? Log in with your social account LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Google Linkedin Facebook start-up Gojek Grab e-commerce warung Bukalapak Tokopedialast_img read more

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Pulis rallies clubs against diving

first_img Pulis confirmed both players accepted their punishment and insisted the responsibility to rid the game of diving does not lie solely with referees. “They (Thomas and Chamakh) have done fantastic for us but we just don’t want to see it,” he said. “I think it is most probably the first time and the last time you will see it. “The one thing I will say is that it is difficult enough refereeing games of football with the pace that the players play at today. “We should be trying to make it as simple as possible for them to do that, not make it more difficult and we have a responsibility on our side to do that properly.” Chamakh is a doubt for Saturday’s visit of Southampton having suffered a hamstring injury in south Wales. Mauricio Pochettino’s Saints are likely to be buoyed heading into the game at Selhurst Park as their quartet of England internationals return to club duties. Adam Lallana and Luke Shaw both came off the bench as England beat Denmark 1-0 while Jay Rodriguez and Rickie Lambert also made up Hodgson’s 30-man squad. Pulis was full of praise for the production line in place at Southampton and revealed he had a soft spot for Lallana, who he has been aware of from a young age. The Crystal Palace boss was irked following last weekend’s 1-1 Barclays Premier League draw at Swansea after Jerome Thomas had been booked for diving and Marouane Chamakh had also gone to ground easily. England coach Roy Hodgson praised Pulis’ hard-line approach earlier in the week after the Welshman came out immediately after the draw and said he intended to reprimand the pair. “I have watched them quite a few times and I think the manager has done a fantastic job there,” Pulis said. “They have got an identity to their team, they play a certain way that is a little bit different to most other teams in the Premier League. As a manager you enjoy watching certain teams. “Lallana actually went to school with my daughter so we always look at what Adam is doing. He comes from a lovely family and is a very level-headed lad and it is lovely to see him doing so well. “With Shaw and (Callum) Chambers, I don’t know what they put in the water down there but they certainly produce some very, very good players.” Tony Pulis believes clubs have to help officials to eradicate simulation after confirming he issued fines to two of his players this week. Press Associationlast_img read more

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Green denies scuffle claims

first_img Former England goalkeeper Green laughed off reports Caulker was injured in a fight at a west London pub during a QPR Christmas lunch, at which Crystal Palace players were also present. QPR senior management have denied Caulker was involved in an altercation, instead insisting the defender slipped and cut his head. “If you wanted an accurate headline on the story, it would be ‘man falls over’,” Green told BBC Radio Five Live. “I think that in response, the club have said pretty much what happened: he came out, slipped over and banged his head. “But this is the nature of the beast in football. I must have been in a different bar. “It was a Sunday lunch, after we’d had a tough week winning two games out of three, including a big win against Burnley. We didn’t have a game until a week on Monday. “We’ve got people far too old to be going out late at night, with me, Rio Ferdinand and Richard Dunne. “Steven was back out of hospital and we had a laugh about it, and unfortunately it’s made the front page of the paper.” Owner Tony Fernandes hailed QPR’s squad spirit to be able to shrug off the newspaper allegations, though Caulker did require hospital treatment for the cut to his head. Fernandes confirmed the squad were granted the Sunday afternoon gathering following a vital 2-0 home victory over Burnley that lifted Rangers out of the Premier League relegation zone. Robert Green has rejected claims QPR team-mate Steven Caulker suffered his cut head in a pub scuffle on Sunday. “I’m aware of some headlines appearing in tomorrow newspaper (sic). After a great win boys were given permission for a Sunday lunch,” Fernandes tweeted late on Monday evening. “Team is very united and really playing for each other. Steven Caulker slipped over and hurt his head and is fine. Nothing else to report. “Great team spirit. We are one. Best I’ve seen since being chairman. A few sensational headlines but team has done us proud.” QPR manager Harry Redknapp recently said there would be no Christmas party for his squad but QPR spokesman Ian Taylor confirmed the gathering on Sunday had been sanctioned. “Following Saturday’s Premier League win versus Burnley and with no further fixture for nine days the club can confirm players were allowed to have a Sunday lunch together,” Taylor wrote on Twitter. “Steven Caulker was not involved in an altercation. He did suffer a cut to his head, which he received treatment for at hospital before being discharged on the same evening. “The club will be making no further comment.” Press Associationlast_img read more

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