North Bergen police fatally shoot man who allegedly stabbed three people

first_imgNORTH BERGEN — Local police fatally shot a man who allegedly stabbed three people Monday morning, according to a press release from the Hudson County Prosecutor’s Office.At 3:20 a.m. Monday morning, officers responded to a 911 call regarding a fight in progress at 1601 Union Tpke. After arriving, one officer noticed a female victim with numerous stab wounds and administered medical aid. The woman then directed two other responding officers to behind the residence, where they found another female victim and a male suspect. Officers attempted to deescalate the situation while administering aid to the second victim. However, their efforts to restrain the man with pepper spray did not work, forcing them to discharge their weapons. The suspect was identified as Winston Espino Sanchez, 45, of Union City. He was struck in the torso, treated on scene, and taken to Jersey City Medical Center, where he later passed away, the release said.The County Prosecutor is investigating. ×last_img read more

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Bright spots to Indy 500 face with no fans?

first_imgCoronavirusIndianaLocalNewsSports Twitter Pinterest Facebook WhatsApp Facebook (“Indianapolis Motor Speedway – Speedway, IN” by Josh Hallett, Creative Commons) It might be hard to believe, but an Indianapolis 500 without fans may come with benefits for the event.The race had already garnered a lot of attention this year with it being the first Indianapolis 500 with the Indianapolis Motor Speedway under new ownership in Roger Penske, who has made vast cosmetic improvements to the famous race track to better the fan experience.With no fans this year, fans will have to wait until next year to take in all the new improvements. Nevertheless, Chris Gahl with Visit Indy, said Penske and the IMS leadership staff made the right call in light of the coronavirus pandemic.“In the long-term, to ensure the health of the event, taking a pause this year is something we support,” Gahl said to Inside Indiana Business. “We again commend the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in being thoughtful in this approach.”Gahl is airing on the brighter side of things when it comes to the announcement. He believes a fanless Indianapolis 500 will lead to a huge local, national, and international TV and radio audience. Along with that, it will spark a bigger interest in next year’s race.“That attention will lead to demand for attending next year,” he said. “This will be a hot ticket come 2021 because it will be off the heels of the COVID pause.”Though the economic hit the city is taking now because of the lack of fans will hurt, Gahl feels the with the increased attention the race could get next year city could be in for a pretty big pay off in the long-run, should the pandemic subside by then. Google+ Twitter Bright spots to Indy 500 face with no fans? WhatsApp Google+ By Network Indiana – August 7, 2020 0 356 Previous articleFood Bank of Northern Indiana releases mobile food distribution schedule, August 10-14Next articleTwo arrested on drug charges in Plymouth Wednesday Network Indiana Pinterestlast_img read more

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Future fuel

first_imgBy K.C. DasUniversity of Georgia Targeted GHG reductions can unintentionally eliminate some promising technologies that are lagging behind because of late starts, such as algae-based biofuels. Anaerobic digestion, a well-developed technology, is not considered because the energy output (methane gas) isn’t a liquid transportation fuel at room temperature. A similar process called landfill bioreactor produces methane biogas which can be converted to compressed natural gas. Its GHG emissions are 17 percent less than its fossil-based equivalent. Anaerobic digestion can create jobs and produce net income to farms and small biofuels producers. UGA researchers are developing a system that combines anaerobic digestion with algae production. Current regulatory policies don’t readily support developing such integrated solutions in early development. More pilot-scale testing could help move them to the marketplace faster. Federal agencies seem focused on large-scale demonstrations before pilot-scale research is completed.Welcomed policy changeCarbon sequestration is a welcomed change in national policy. Current regulatory emphasis favors carbon capture and storage through geological storage of compressed CO2. Although potentially a reliable technique, this approach favors larger-scale sequestration.One example of a smaller-scale method is using biochar, a byproduct of pyrolysis, a high-temperature breakdown of cellulosic materials that produces a liquid hydrocarbon, which could be converted to green diesel or other liquid fuels. Biochar has high carbon content and stays in the soil for decades, increasing agricultural productivity and sequestering carbon for a long time. However, the regulatory framework doesn’t favor developing this technology.There is great promise for biofuels to augment our energy supply. New ideas, technologies and discoveries are emerging from universities and research centers daily. Development and use of these discoveries could be faster if regulatory framework would support deeper exploration into novel crops that don’t pit fuel against food. Encourage innovationWe need policies to encourage processes and technologies that create jobs and income for farms and small businesses. We need support that allows us to investigate diverse feedstocks and low-cost, efficient production methods that protect and enhance the environment. If we are to reach 36 billion gallons of biofuels in our transportation fuel mix by 2022 while reducing GHG emissions, all avenues of exploration must be open and barriers to development removed. (K.C. Das is director of the Biorefining and Carbon Cycling Program with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and Faculty of Engineering. This editorial was presented as testimony before the U.S. House Committee on Small Business’ subcommittee on regulations and healthcare.) The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 charges the U.S. to add 36 billion gallons of biofuels to the country’s transportation fuel mix by 2022. Continued investment in research, development and deployment are required to achieve this goal.Recent scientific studies warn that increasing land use for producing biomass for biofuels would increase greenhouse gas, or GHG, emissions compared to gasoline. Some may disagree with these studies. However, they do show the weakness in expanding a crop-based fuel system without planning for sustainability.If we continue to try to produce more biomass from the current spectrum of crop choices, GHG emission restrictions could put small biofuel producers and family farms at a disadvantage. Reduced emissions require crops that are easier to grow; require less money to plant, harvest and water; and are easier to process. Needed production improvementsCorn ethanol production in the U.S. consumes a quarter of the country’s corn crop. Increasing ethanol production to the targeted 15 billion gallons a year by 2022 will double the corn required. That increase will impact land and water needs and create environmental concerns. We need to improve the productivity of corn and other biofuels crops and incorporate improvements into the production process. Producing lignocellulosic ethanol or other advanced biofuels, or green diesel, is a challenge. Technology development in this field has advanced, but most U.S. facilities are still in the early-demonstration phase. Using existing forestry and agriculture residues for biofuels would have minimal environmental impact while creating opportunity for small businesses and farms.Forestry and agriculture generate significant biomass. According to the Department of Energy and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, forestlands can produce 368 million dry tons of biomass annually. Current legislative definitions make renewable forest biomass off-limits to biofuels companies. Definitions must be changed, while maintaining the resources’ sustainability.Data from the UGA Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources suggests collecting residues and producing chips for biofuel production costs $11 to $12 per ton delivered to mills. Food v. fuelIt’s crucial that we have a diverse source of biomass that doesn’t compete with food supplies. Diversity allows different geographical regions to focus on crops best suited to local conditions. Current federal funding often favors specific feedstocks, hampering development and transfer technology for novel crops. Many novel crops are being explored. For example, a recent UGA study looked at using a multi-benefit winter cover crop, oil seed radish, for its biofuels potential. UGA scientists led a global team in sequencing the sorghum genome and are now working toward understanding how we can use the information to produce biofuels at lower costs in poor soils. Targets eliminate possibilitieslast_img read more

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Is there a ‘Thursday Night Football’ game tonight? NFL schedule, channels for Week 16

first_imgFor the first time this season, there is no “Thursday Night Football” game to help NFL fans get through the week. Instead, Week 16 presents Saturday contests.This Saturday, the Texans will visit the Buccaneers, the Bills will visit the Patriots, and the Rams will visit the 49ers. The advantage of Saturday games over Thursday games, of course, is more physical recovery time for players and game plan construction for coaches. Often this year, Thursday night has featured sloppy play, such as when the 49ers nearly lost to the Cardinals in Week 9 and when Browns upended the Steelers in Week 11.The NFL will not be a Thursday night football game in Week 17, either. Every game is on Sunday for the final weekend of the regular season. NFL WEEK 16 PICKS: Straight up | Against the spreadIs there a ‘Thursday Night Football’ game tonight?There is no Week 16 NFL game scheduled for Thursday, Dec. 19. Instead, there will be a trio of Saturday games this weekend.NFL schedule Week 16Note: National broadcasts are listed in bold.Saturday, Dec. 21GameTimeTVTexans at Buccaneers1 p.m. ETNFL Network, fuboTVBills at Patriots4:30 p.m. ETNFL Network, fuboTVRams at 49ers8:15 p.m. ETNFL Network, fuboTVSunday, Dec. 22GameTimeChannelJaguars vs. Falcons1 p.m.Fox, fuboTVRavens vs. Browns1 p.m.CBS, fuboTVSaints vs. Titans1 p.m.Fox, fuboTVPanthers vs. Colts1 p.m.Fox, fuboTVBengals vs. Dolphins1 p.m.CBS, fuboTVSteelers vs. Jets1 p.m.CBS, fuboTVGiants vs. Redskins1 p.m.Fox, fuboTVLions vs. Broncos4:05 p.m.CBS, fuboTVRaiders vs. Chargers4:05 p.m.CBS, fuboTVCowboys vs. Eagles4:25 p.m.Fox, fuboTVCardinals vs. Seahawks4:25 p.m.Fox, fuboTVChiefs vs. Bears8:25 p.m.NBC, fuboTVMonday, Dec. 23GameTimeTVPackers vs. Vikings8:15 p.m.ESPNlast_img read more

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