Water Summit.

first_imgThe Upper Suwannee River Water Summit, hosted by the Upper Suwannee Watershed Initiative, will be Dec. 14 in Tifton, Ga. The summit is intended to inform residents and elected officials about water quantity and quality issues in southwest Georgia.Many rivers in south Georgia face water shortages and high pollution levels. Gov. Roy Barnes has called on the state legislature to make water issues a top priority on its 2001 agenda. In the coming year, decisions will be made that will affect all Georgians and their access to our watershed.South Georgia River BasinsAt the summit, people in the Withlacoochee, Alapaha, Little and Suwannee river basins will meet with those working on the water issues that affect them. They will become involved in developing solutions to the region’s water problems.The summit will be at the Rural Development Center on the Tifton campus of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.The program will begin at 8 a.m. Thursday and run until 4 p.m. A continental breakfast and lunch will be included in the $25 registration fee. To sign up, or to get more information, call the RDC conference office at (912) 386-3416.last_img read more

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Why net neutrality matters to credit unions

first_imgYou may have read something online about Net Neutrality. Or, your techie friend insisted you submit a comment to the FCC about it.  “The fate of the Internet rests on our speaking out!”, or something along those lines.What is it, and why am I talking about it on a credit union blog?Put simply, it’s the principle that all information is treated equally.  And, without it, could mean the end of credit unions.Net Neutrality has always been a part of the World Wide Web, from its humble beginnings.  Tiny upstarts like Google and Netflix got to where they are today because of net neutrality.  How?  Let’s revisit the early days of Internet Service Providers (ISPs).  They are the companies we pay to get us online.  In the early days, it was done through the screeching modem and a list of phone numbers.  Now, it’s your cable, fiber, or DSL connection.  In the 90s, dial-up was common and there were multiple choices for service.  The precursor to my own company ran on an ISP out of Miami.  They were great; fair pricing, experienced support, and we knew we were supporting a local business.  The web through one ISP was the exact same web as through another.  As a result, you knew that your website would load on any other person’s computer, and at approximately the same speed, no matter who they paid to get online, or where they were located. continue reading » 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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