Mayor’s Message: May 24

first_imgMayor Jay Gillian Dear Friends, It was great to see so many cars streaming into town this morning as we all get ready for another summer in Ocean City. Representatives of the city and the Ocean City Beach Patrol “unlocked the ocean” this afternoon and local groups took the first official swim of the summer in the always chilly Business Persons Plunge. The events kicked off what promises to be a gorgeous and sunny Memorial Day Weekend. I hope you and your families enjoy the great weather. But I want to remind everybody that Memorial Day is more than just a holiday and a day off work. It’s a time to remember and to reflect on the ultimate sacrifices made by so many service members and their families. They gave their lives so all of us might live in freedom. I encourage you all to attend our annual Memorial Day Service at 11 a.m. Monday (May 27). The ceremony will be at the Ocean City Tabernacle (550 Wesley Avenue). Our community has always respected the men and women of our military, and the event is well-attended. This year’s keynote speaker will be Army Staff Sgt. Patrick Carney, who suffered multiple injuries during two tours of duty in Iraq. Carney is now on staff at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. I hope to see you all there on Monday. At 3 p.m. Monday, Ocean City will participate in the National Moment of Remembrance. A bugler will play “Taps” in front of the Ocean City Music Pier, and it will be broadcast on the Boardwalk speaker system during a moment of silence. I’m sad to report the passing of two long-time Ocean City residents who were an important part of our community. John Henry, who was honored at Ocean City’s first Juneteenth celebration in 2017, will be remembered by many as the lightning-fast running back for Ocean City High School in the 1960s. He was one of the greatest athletes in school history. In recent years, when he wasn’t fishing, he could be found cruising the north end on his three-wheeler and chatting with neighbors. Mae Costello passed away last Friday. She was a dedicated volunteer in the St. Augustine’s parish and long-time Shriver’s employee who lived a rich life serving family, church and community in her 94 years. She passed along a spirit of volunteerism to her family, who remain active in the community. Michele and I would like to extend our deepest condolences to the extended family and friends of these two beloved citizens. I want to let everybody know in advance that Atlantic City Electric repairs to an underwater cable serving Ocean City could lead to a service interruption up to 30 minutes long on Tuesday, May 28. The outage will occur sometime between 9 a.m. and 10 a.m. on Tuesday, May 28. It will affect homes and businesses in parts of the city north of 11th Street (see maps of the affected areas). Warm regards,Mayor Jay A. Gillianlast_img read more

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From the islands to the bayous

first_img <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRuPbqnL4Hg” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/oRuPbqnL4Hg/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> It was 1997 in the Canary Islands and Thenesoya V. Martín De la Nuez, then 18, was struck by the voice of a Louisiana man singing a Creole version of a Spanish poem.“I was so moved, I cried. Here was an American, a U.S. citizen — and he was speaking like us, like Canary Islanders,” Martín says.Delacroix Highway, La.The emotional connection sent her on a mission to chronicle the fading culture of the descendants of Canary Islanders who settled in Spanish Louisiana in the 18th century.Her research gained urgency in 2005 when news reports of Canarians rocked by the destruction of Hurricane Katrina compelled her to reach out to members of the diaspora community and meet them face-to-face.Now a Ph.D. candidate at Harvard’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS) and a teaching fellow in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, Martín’s research has bloomed into a sprawling cultural documentary project, traveling photo exhibit, and book.Wimpy Serigne, St. Bernard Parish, La.The book will incorporate more than 100 interviews and 8,000 photographs collected during four years of fieldwork with her husband, photojournalist Aníbal Martel, which help make up the Cislanderus project. The name is a sort of acronym of Canary Islanders and U.S. that also intends “us” to emphasize the commonalities.Martín said the book “will be a story of cultural survival, investigating how the complex Canarian cultural legacy has survived or, in most cases, been reinvented in a complicated process of cultural nostalgia.”Top: Thenesoya Martin and Aníbal Martel exhibit their work at a Canary Islands museum. Above, clockwise from top left, Martin conducts fieldwork, reading family records with a Canary Islands descendant in San Antonio, Texas; interviewing Tini Perez of St. Bernard Parish, La., who retains a vestigial Spanish from the Islands; meeting with a Baton Rouge, La., Canarian; and researching 18th century church records in Louisiana.“I had been reading for years, but I was always missing something,” she said. “The faces of people. Where are they? Who are they? Do they seem like Canary Islanders right now?“I didn’t have any idea of how they looked, how they dressed, where they lived or what they did. I wanted to be there. I wanted to understand how their cultural legacy developed over three centuries. I wanted to understand how successive waves of immigration and migration from the Spanish peninsula and the Caribbean, as well as marriages into the Cajun community, shaped and affected that legacy.”Joseph and Selena Gonzalez, Yscloskey, St. Bernard Parish, La.The couple began their investigations in Delacroix Island, Shell Beach, and Reggio, unincorporated communities in St. Bernard Parish, New Orleans, then followed a complicated map of Canary Island descendants scattered throughout Louisiana, including around Baton Rouge and the lower Mississippi River. Today they have expanded their fieldwork to San Antonio, Texas.“We want to document the present,” Martín said. “It’s the book I looked for at the beginning, but it didn’t exist. So I am writing it.”Dot Benge, above, and Jerry Alfonso, top, of St. Bernard Parish, La.A Canarian from Baton Rouge, La.Sign documenting Canarian immigrants’ boats, St. Bernard, La.Barataria, one of the four Canarian settlements in Louisiana.Sunset in the bayous beyond the retaining wall, South New Orleans.Henry Jr. Rodriguez, St. Bernard Parish, La.In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, a sunken boat in Dalacroix Island, South New Orleans, above, and an elevated home in Hopedale, La., below.Felice Lopez Melerine, St. Bernard, La.Thomas Gonzales, Delacroix Island, La.Canarian cemetery, St. Bernard, La.Bayou, Hopedale, La.Pier and pelicans, Hopedale, St. Bernard Parish, La.Florisant Highway, South New Orleans.Henry Martinez and his grandson Kim fish the bayous.Bayou, Shell Beach, La.Thenesoya Martin in San Antonio, Texas.Erwinville, La.last_img read more

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“Into the Storm” playing at Wellington Regent Theater

first_imgThis week at the Regent Theater: “Into the Storm.” (Movie trailer is below).When: Friday 7 p.m. Saturday 2, 7 and 9:15 p.m. Sunday 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.Sneak Peak tonight!: Middle School Special Screening is Saturday at 9:15 p.m. Wear your Knights t-shirt and get in for only $6!Rated: PG-13. Time: 1 hour and 29 minutes.Movie Synopsis: In the span of a single day, the town of Silverton is ravaged by an unprecedented onslaught of tornadoes. The entire town is at the mercy of the erratic and deadly cyclones, even as storm trackers predict the worst is yet to come. Most people seek shelter, while others run towards the vortex, testing how far a storm chaser will go for that once-in-a-lifetime shot. Told through the eyes and lenses of professional storm chasers, thrill-seeking amateurs, and courageous townspeople, “Into the Storm” throws you directly into the eye of the storm to experience Mother Nature at her most extreme. (C) Warner BrosRotten Tomatoes rating (movie critics collective approval ratings): 20%. Audience review: 50% approval. Movies ahead at Regent Theater:Next weekend:The Giver.Follow us on Twitter. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. There are no comments posted yet. Be the first one! Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more

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