Vermont Health Insurance Assistance Program awarded $227,000 grant

first_imgNearly $227,000 of new funding is being distributed to the Vermont State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP) to help Medicare beneficiaries in Vermont get more information about their health care choices.The funds are part of the $35.8 million being distributed to the 54 SHIPs that provide Medicare beneficiaries with local, personalized assistance on a wide variety of Medicare and health insurance topics. The Vermont State Health Insurance Program serves an important role in providing information and support to people with Medicare all across Vermont, said CMS Acting Administrator Charlene Frizzera. This new funding will help to ensure that the Vermont SHIP continues to work with local governments, community-based organizations and other partners in Vermont to help meet the needs of our Medicare beneficiaries.CMS expects the SHIPs to use the 2009 funding to conduct targeted community-based outreach to people with Medicare who may be unable to access other sources of information. SHIPs will also provide outreach and assistance to current and newly eligible Medicare beneficiaries and their caregivers, with a special emphasis on reaching people who will most likely be eligible for Medicare s low-income subsidy if they enroll in Medicare prescription drug coverage.The Vermont State Health Insurance Program will use grant funds in part to continue to partner with the Vermont Center for Independent Living, disease advocacy groups, community action agencies, public welfare offices, veteran s groups and faith-based organizations to reach beneficiaries under the age of 65 with disabilities. The Vermont SHIP will also focus on hard to reach rural populations by working with case management staff, nutrition and information and assistance specialists and family caregiver specialists at the Area Agencies on Aging (AAAs) across the state.CMS will continue to support the quality of services provided by SHIPs through training, technical assistance, the SHIP Resource Center, and the online tools at www.medicare.gov(link is external) to assist people with Medicare.last_img read more

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Gold Coast records huge profit on property sales

first_imgGold CoastMore from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa18 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days agoGOLD Coast homeowners are making more than $480 million in profits with new figures confirming a booming property market.The latest CoreLogic Pain and Gain report reveals nine out of 10 property owners made a profit in the December quarter.More than 90 per cent of sales recorded a total profit of $482,076,853 while 8.2 per cent of sales recorded a $15,613,522 loss.The quarterly report tracks home sales across Australia and reveals the proportion of sales being sold at a profit versus those being sold at a loss.“With property values continuing to increase over the final quarter of 2017, albeit at a more moderate pace, the proportion of properties resold at a profit has continued to climb,” Research analyst Cameron Kusher said.last_img read more

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Run. Hide. Fight. Reflect: The effects of trauma after tragedy

first_imgPhoto by Katie ChinIt was an ordinary Monday afternoon for Cindy Shiu: Her finance class was canceled, and she was ready to start on homework on the fourth floor of Fertitta Hall. Leaving the restroom, she opened the door to a group of policemen in bulletproof vests, holding guns pointed in all directions.“A shot of adrenaline I’ve never felt before rushed through my body,” Shiu said. “I bolted down those four flights of stairs.”Less than one day after the Las Vegas massacre, an adjunct professor in the Marshall School of Business started her 12 p.m. class. Students in the class say she was visibly distraught and was talking about friends who were the city when the shooting took place, leaving 58 dead and 489 injured. Five minutes into class, she falsely claimed there was an active shooter on campus and left the classroom.Minutes later, public safety officers and police arrived on the scene, ordering students to evacuate. Hundreds of students fled Fertitta Hall, seeking shelter in nearby buildings. Shiu, a junior majoring in business administration, was one of them.In the aftermath of any episode of mass violence, terrorist attack or natural disaster, individuals touched directly or indirectly are at a higher risk of displaying traumatic stress reactions, according to the National Center for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. According to the center, traumatic stress reactions manifest in four main categories: emotional, cognitive, physical and interpersonal effects.“Most of these issues occur across a developmental spectrum, they just present themselves differently,” said David Schonfeld, a professor of practice, social work and pediatrics at the USC Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work.Some symptoms include shock, terror, irritability, blame, anger, guilt, grief, emotional numbing, sleep disorders and helplessness, he said. Individuals may display one, many or none of these symptoms.“Sometimes you don’t see the signs,” Schonfeld said. “Sometimes it’s just based [on] experience and exposure, especially if you’re talking about internal states. The person feels it though.”From a student perspective, Shiu believes the University could have responded to the false reports more quickly with available USC mental health resources and given students extra time to process the stressful situation last Monday.“I felt like they should have clearly emphasized mental health services for students and have every professor mention [the false report] briefly,” Shiu said. “I know students who carried on with their midterms at 2 p.m., and that’s not OK.”Provost Michael Quick issued a statement around 4 p.m. the Monday of the incident, three hours after the Los Angeles Police Department confirmed there was no active shooter. Immediately after the lockdown was lifted, classes resumed as scheduled, unless a professor decided otherwise.A specialist in pediatric bereavement and crisis and the director for the National Center for School Crisis and Bereavement, Schonfeld and his team work with schools across the country to educate and support those experiencing trauma. In educational institutions, a common symptom following a traumatic event is lack of focus and unproductiveness among students, faculty and staff.“Kids have trouble learning in school, teachers have trouble concentrating and teaching,” Schonfeld said. “This leads to deterioration in academic and work performance.”Damon Clark, a trauma surgeon at Keck Hospital of USC, noted that the healing process for trauma patients is long. It also requires a multidisciplinary team of professionals working together to mentally and physically heal those affected.“There’s pain associated to whatever extent their injuries are plus surgical procedures required to treat that injury,” Clark said. “When we have a typical trauma patient from a violent act, we get social work, counselors fairly involved because a lot of them deal with the pain, anxiety, depression.”Clark believes that the mental aspect is often overlooked in the public.“In terms of some of the research we do in interpersonal violence, it takes time and a lot of effort to heal from wounds,” Clark said. “But I think one of the major aspects that people forget is the emotional state that people go through. People don’t forget going through that kind of event.”After evaluations, Clark and his team work with social workers and police to identify next of kin and support those close to the victims. He also continues to brief relatives and close friends of the patient’s status.“The key thing when you’re dealing with this is to have conversations about the patient’s physical and emotional health as often as possible,” Clark said. “You need to be honest about how they’re doing and describe as much of the process as you can.”To support fellow Trojans experiencing distress after a major event, Schonfeld recommends friends and classmates to reach out and cheer them up. Though people may feel worried of upsetting someone further, he believes it helps the individual be more open.“They can withdraw and feel alienated,” Schonfeld said. “The problem is a lot of the time people don’t know what to say and they figure, ‘If I ask about it, it’s going to upset them.’ You’re not upsetting them, you’re just inviting them to share their feelings, so that hopefully you can support them.”Doctors, social workers and other medical professionals in the USC community are also available.“We don’t think you can live your life worrying about an incident that may or may not happen, but if there is, we’re here for the community,” Clark said. “We’ll support you physically, emotionally and psychologically — whatever is needed.”last_img read more

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Workmanlike win for St George’s

first_img Today’s games St Mary’s College vs Norman Manley Ascot vs Denham Town Papine vs Kingston College St Catherine vs Ardenne Haile Selassie vs Jonathan Grant Pembroke Hall vs Meadowbrook Hydel vs St Jago Calabar vs Campion College Bridgeport vs Cumberland (Home teams are named first and all games start at 3:30 p.m.) St George’s College started the new ISSA/FLOW Manning Cup football competition with a hard-fought victory against Tivoli Gardens High at the Edward Seaga Complex yesterday. The 20-time champions had to work hard for the three points in the Group A clash. Last year’s top goalscorer in the Manning Cup, Alex Marshall, put the Light Blues ahead in the 45th minute and captain Dominic James added the other goal in the 74th minute. Marshall, with his pace and skill, tormented the Tivoli back-line. Tivoli’s goalkeeper, Ricardo Brown, made some fine saves to prevent St George’s from winning by a wider margin. Tivoli had their good moments but failed to trouble St George’s College custodian John Wilson. Marshall, who was away in the summer on trial at St Pauli FC in Germany, says it was a hard game, but the important thing is the three points earned. “I was not at 100 per cent, so I am going back to training to work harder. It is always good to start a competition with a win and we are thankful for the result”, Marshall told The Gleaner. “It’s a team sport, so although I’m targeted, we play to help each other,” the 18 year-old shared. St George’s College assistant coach, Marcel Gayle described the victory as “a workmanlike performance.” “We were pushed to the limit by the Tivoli team today, but it was important to start on a winning note,” Gayle said. On the other hand, Tommy Ricketts, coach of Tivoli High, blamed faulty finishing for his team’s second consecutive defeat from two games.last_img read more

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