Dys promoted to reporter, Melendez joins News staff

first_img Dys promoted to reporter, Melendez joins News staff Britt Dys has been promoted from advertising specialist to assistant editor of The Florida Bar Journal & News. And Melinda Melendez has joined the Bar to become the advertising specialist handling classified ads.Dys, 28, from St. Petersburg, is a 2002 Florida State University graduate with a bachelor’s degree in communications and a minor in creative writing. She joined the Bar’s staff in March 2003. Her new duties include compiling the New and Notes, Benchmarks, and On the Move columns for the News, as well as writing occasional news stories. She will help edit articles for the Journal. She can be reached by e-mail at [email protected] or by calling (850) 561-5689.In her spare time, Dys is an avid reader, creative writer, and amateur artist.Joining the Bar Journa l & News this month is 23-year-old Melendez, who came from Connecticut to attend Florida State. A 2003 FSU graduate, Melendez earned dual bachelor’s degrees in English and Humanities. She is an actress, singer, and dancer, with the Tallahassee group Theatre a la Carte.Melendez can be reached by e-mail at [email protected] or by calling her at (850) 561-5695. Dys promoted to reporter, Melendez joins News staff December 15, 2003 Regular Newslast_img read more

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‘Wear a mask if you care’, task force says as WHO warns of aerosol transmission

first_imgOn Thursday, the WHO released new guidelines encouraging people to avoid crowds and ensure good ventilation, explaining that some outbreak reports related to crowded indoor spaces have suggested the possibility of aerosol transmission. This is in addition to contact with contaminated surfaces or with infected people who spread the virus through droplets released when they cough, sneeze, speak or sing.Therefore, Mahardika urged public service providers to ensure the use of natural ventilation such as opening doors and windows.On the other hand, he said, using exhaust fans was an alternative to help lower transmission potential in indoor spaces.“We can reduce the viral load in the air by propelling the air through an exhaust vent.”Mahardika reiterated that wearing masks should not be based on fear of contracting the virus but rather the awareness that anyone — including ourselves — could be a carrier and might infect others.“Wear a mask if you care about the people around you.” The two experts emphasized that chances for transmission could be minimized if people wore masks.Read also: WHO acknowledges ‘evidence emerging’ of airborne spread of COVID-19“Contagion is likely to occur in closed buildings with ACs, but if the people inside wear masks and maintain physical distancing, then the potential of transmission is much lower. Wearing masks remains a top preventive measure,” Budiman, who is also a microbiologist at the University of Indonesia (UI), said during a press briefing on Friday.“The mask stops any particles from the individual’s mouth and nose from traveling into the air.” The national COVID-19 task force has encouraged the public to keep wearing masks to prevent the transmission of the novel coronavirus, following a recent report by the World Health Organization that acknowledges the virus may be transmitted through the air.  According to I Gusti Ngurah Mahardika, a Udayana University virologist who is also part of the task force’s expert staff, airborne transmission was possible in crowded indoor spaces such as malls, offices, restaurants and public transportation that had air conditioning (AC) instead of natural ventilation.Another expert staffer, Budiman Bela, said transmission potential was higher in rooms and indoor spaces where the air was cold because the virus tended to be more stable at low temperatures.center_img Topics :last_img read more

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MCC Detains LINSU President, Colleague

first_imgOfficers of the Monrovia City Corporation (MCC) yesterday arrested and detained the president of the Liberia National Student Union (LINSU), Varney Jarsey and his colleague, Charles Blamah.They were charged for “disorderly conduct and illegal entrance to MCC Annex at the Freeport of Monrovia.”MCC Police Director, Col. Kenneth Harris explained that the student leaders were arrested after they broke into the MCC Freeport Annex and made away with a vehicle the MCC had earlier impounded for “violation.”“At about 4 p.m., I received a call that two unidentified men have broken the gate to the fence and took away a vehicle impounded there earlier. They broke the lock and forcibly removed the car, which was impounded by our field officers,” Col. Harris explained.He said by the time he arrived on the scene, the two accused had escaped with the vehicle, “but we put up a chase and arrested them in Vai Town near the Gabriel Tucker Bridge.”Director Harris explained further that the accused student leaders were “very aggressive” during their arrest, which prompted the MCC to deny their right to contact their lawyers and family members.He said, however, that the accused were later allowed to contact their lawyers and family members, “because we noticed they were by then calm as compared to the hostile attitude they exhibited earlier.”He said the duo was charged for “unlawful entrance into MCC property where they vandalized the portion of the fence and put up disorderly conduct when they were ordered arrested.”The two men would appear at the City Court to answer to their charges today, Col. Harris said.He warned other student leaders and the general public not to take advantage of their status as students to get in conflict with the law.For their part, the two detainees earlier refused to speak to the Daily Observer when they were contacted at their cell. However, they claimed that their rights were violated by the City Police.But they later argued that their missing vehicle was found in a fence near the Freeport where they managed to drive it away without coming in contact with any law enforcement officers, be they City Police or not.They said they were denied to make telephone calls to their family members and their lawyers after they requested the City Police to do so.Jarsey argued that while they were away, “the City Police took advantage of that and took away our vehicle to their fence without prior notice.”“We thereafter looked for our car and noticed it was in the fence at the Freeport. This is how come we forcibly opened the fence and took our vehicle away. We did not violate any traffic regulations as alleged by the MCC,” the accused told this newspaper adding, “We were intimidated during our arrest and handcuffed before being placed behind bars.”Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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