DMK stages walk out in Lok Sabha over NEET

first_imgNew Delhi: The DMK on Monday slammed the Centre for rejecting two resolutions passed by the Tamil Nadu Assembly seeking exemption to state students from writing the National Eligibility Cum Entrance Test (NEET). DMK members walked out of the Lok Sabha when the government did not respond. DMK’s T.R. Balu raised the issue during Zero Hour, saying the Bills were adopted by the state Assembly but were rejected by the central government after 27 months. Also Read – How a psychopath killer hid behind the mask of a devout laity! “Are we ruled by the Centre? The Centre did not consider the value of the resolution passed by the Tamil Nadu Assembly,” Balu said amid uproar in the House over the political crisis in Karnataka. Amid the din, Balu demanded a response from the government. When the government did not respond, the DMK members trooped out of the House. The Tamil Nadu Assembly had passed the resolutions in 2017.last_img read more

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A look at the status of Northern Gateway and other major Canadian

CALGARY – Proposed pipelines in Canada seem to be taking two steps back for every step forward.The latest backslide came Tuesday when proponents of Enbridge’s Northern Gateway pipeline said they will not appeal a Federal Court of Appeal decision in June to quash Ottawa’s approval of the $7.9-billion project. The federal government then said it won’t appeal, either. The court had ruled the approval must be set aside because government had failed in its duty to consult with aboriginal people.Here’s a look at and an update on the status of all major Canadian pipeline projects.Northern Gateway:Enbridge’s Northern Gateway pipeline would ship 525,000 barrels per day of oilsands crude from northeast of Edmonton to Kitimat, B.C. Its goal is to sell Alberta crude in lucrative Asian markets. A parallel line would bring 193,000 bpd of bitumen-thinning diluent in the opposite direction.Northern Gateway has been hugely controversial. The idea of crude-oil laden supertankers navigating the choppy waters of the Douglas Channel on their way out to the Pacific is a non-starter for many British Columbians. The line also passes through huge tracts of unceded First Nations territory in B.C., which has many aboriginal groups — especially on the coast — staunchly opposed to it.Until the June court decision, Enbridge had had a federal permit to build Northern Gateway since mid-2014. On Tuesday, the company urged the federal government to meet its constitutional obligations to meaningfully consult with First Nations and Metis to get the project back on track.Energy East:TransCanada, the same company behind Keystone XL, applied to the National Energy Board in October 2014 to build the Energy East Pipeline. The $15.7-billion project aims to ship 1.1-million barrels of Alberta crude a day across six provinces and 4,600 kilometres.The pipeline would supply crude to import-dependent eastern refineries, as well as export landlocked Alberta oil to Europe and India. Energy East would repurpose existing natural gas pipe for about two thirds of the way and build new pipe through Quebec and New Brunswick.Three days of National Energy Board hearings were held in August in Saint John, but hearings in Montreal the following week were postponed and then cancelled after protesters disrupted proceedings. They accused panellists of bias after learning two of them had met privately last year with former Quebec premier Jean Charest, a consultant for TransCanada Corp at the time.In early September, the three-member panel recused themselves. NEB chairman Peter Watson and vice-chair Lyne Mercier gave up their responsibility to appoint a new panel, instead leaving the job to the government. Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr has said the promised 21-month review process for Energy East could be “modestly” delayed as a new panel is chosen.TransCanada says construction would begin shortly after approval, with the goal of shipping oil in 2021.Keystone XL:TransCanada applied for U.S. permission to build its Keystone XL pipeline in September 2008. The idea was to extend an existing cross-border pipeline to give oilsands crude a more direct route to U.S. Gulf Coast refineries.At the time, TransCanada thought the XL segment would make its way through the regulatory process just as smoothly as the previous phases. It was wrong.The stretch of pipe cutting a diagonal line from the Saskatchewan-Montana border to southern Nebraska became the focal point of the environmental movement. Debate over Keystone XL centred not only on the environmental impacts on the American Heartland in the event of a spill, but on its broader role in hastening climate change.After a seven-year regulatory saga, U.S. President Barack Obama rejected Keystone XL last November. Now, TransCanada has set in motion a US$15-billion challenge under the North American Free Trade Agreement, arguing it was treated inequitably. It has also launched a separate federal lawsuit seeking a declaration that Obama overstepped his constitutional power.Trans Mountain:The Canadian arm of U.S. energy giant Kinder Morgan is aiming to nearly triple the capacity of its Trans Mountain pipeline to 890,000 barrels of oil per day. The existing Trans Mountain line currently ships 300,000 bpd of various petroleum products from the Edmonton area to the B.C. Lower Mainland and Washington State.The $5.4-billion project has faced stiff opposition from those who don’t want to see more crude-filled tankers moving through the Burrard Inlet. Protesters held up survey work on Burnaby Mountain late last year.Kinder Morgan filed its regulatory application for the Trans Mountain expansion in late 2013. The National Energy Board hearing process for Trans Mountain has been highly criticized, with commenters and intervenors withdrawing from the process. The board has issued 145 draft conditions that Kinder Morgan must meet if the project is to be approved, and the company says that’s achievable.In November, a report is due from a three-person federal review panel doing indigenous consultations. The federal government has vowed to decide whether or not to approve Trans Mountain before the end of December.Line 9B:Enbridge obtained regulatory approval for its Line 9B reversal and expansion project in March 2014. The original Line 9 has been in the ground for four decades and had been running from Montreal to southwestern Ontario since 1998. But given shifting market dynamics, Enbridge decided to restore its flow to its original west-to-east configuration.That would enable crude to get to Quebec refineries, like Suncor Energy’s facility in eastern Montreal. The project also involves boosting the line’s capacity to 300,000 barrels a day from 240,000 barrels.Work on the project has been complete since the fall of 2014. The National Energy Board gave its blessing to start Line 9B last year and it is currently operational. A look at the status of Northern Gateway and other major Canadian pipeline projects by Dan Healing, The Canadian Press Posted Sep 20, 2016 2:19 pm MDT Last Updated Sep 20, 2016 at 3:59 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more

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LETTER Tax reform appears to have been relegated to the back

Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedLETTER: GRA responds to inaccuracies on Corporate TaxOctober 13, 2017In “latest news”Income Tax exemptions for President, others should be removed- Tax Reform CommitteeOctober 17, 2017In “Business”IMF team to assess VAT to determine feasibility of reductionJuly 19, 2016In “latest news” Dear Editor,President Granger did not mention the phrase (tax reform) once in his “2015 manifesto” message, while his PM Candidate stated that his team “proposes to restructure the tax recovery system, not to oppress the wage earner, but to catch the tax dodger”.  But after some two and a half years, although the Government’s Tax Reform Committee made sweeping recommendations, tax reform appears to have been relegated to the back burners.I want to focus on one particular set of tax measures against the backdrop of the Guyana Business Summit 2017; I speak specifically of Corporation Taxes (CTAX). According to the Ram & McRae website, there are three rates of CTAX in Guyana – a 30% rate that applies to non-commercial companies, a 40% rate that applies to commercial companies except telephone companies and finally a 45% rate for the telephone companies.If one just observes the CTAX rates in Trinidad as an example, they have a basic rate of 25% and a band of 35% that is applied to the oil and gas industry.  If you are a company in Guyana, and you have a legal choice, which country would you prefer to pay your taxes? Guyana at 35%/40% or Trinidad at 25%/35%!This situation has opened a door to a practice called transfer pricing that allows companies to avoid paying their fair share of taxes in Guyana legally.  It is called tax avoidance. In reality, the tax burden is exported from Guyana to another country with a lower tax rate, allowing that company to bypass the Guyana treasury. In reality, there is such a company called Guyana Stockfeeds (Trinidad) Ltd which is a subsidiary of Guyana Stockfeeds Inc (Read the Annual Report).The solution to increasing the CTAX payment to the Guyana treasury is simple – reform the tax system. But it requires a phased reduction of the CTAX rates. A strategic starting point is a reduction of the rate from 35% to 25% for the non-commercial companies (mainly the dwindling manufacturing sector).  That one concession will make a world of difference to the investment landscape.I disagree with the minister’s excuse that tax reforms will have adverse budgetary consequences.   It has been empirically proven in many instances that any reduction of the CTAX will directly enhance the investment climate, generate new jobs and new tax payments. Reduction in the rate of taxes is a flow, not a spot transaction and thus to quantify the impact of the tax reform, one must quantify the cost-benefits over a period of time (let us say a year) and this is what the minister has refused to do.  Rather he is focused on the spot position and his “book losses” at a particular date.  But that is a “bean-counting” mentality.Any reduction in the CTAX will result in the freeing-up of hundreds of millions of new dollars for new investments.The ideal principle of taxation is “broaden the base and lower the tax rates”. The principle goal of tax reform is to promote economic well-being and drive aggregate demand – new investments, enhanced productivity and a living wage.  Instead, the Minister of Finance Mr Jordan continues to delay the implementation of the recommended tax reforms that even Mr Statia advised (he sat on the Tax Reform Commission).It is time for the minister to wake up and cut through the fog and if he does not understand the core concepts, why isn’t he buying expertise to help him.  For how long more can Guyana bear a Minister in training behind the 8-ball? At this stage of the game, we should not be discussing the reduction of the CTAX rate for the private sector; it should have been a well-advanced process already reaping the benefits from the increased investments, augmented productivity and expanded wages for the workers which would have all been feeding into the expansion in aggregate demand and by extension the economy.Sincerely,Sase Singh read more

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