Marchers Rally Against Gun Violence

first_imgMarty Torpey, of Cape May, and her husband, Mike, lost their teenage son, John, to gun violence in 1992. By Maddy VitaleWearing orange and carrying posters that read “We Can End Gun Violence” and “Every Town For Gun Safety,” about 150 people marched across the Ninth Street Bridge Saturday, from Somers Point to Ocean City, to take a stand against gun violence in America.The event was hosted by the group Moms Demand Action For Gun Sense in America. Janet Yunghans, one of the organizers of the rally, said she joined the organization after the Parkland shootings Feb. 14, 2018.Going online to voice her sadness and anger over mass shootings was not enough, she told the crowd prior to the walk.“I had to get involved,” she said.Yunghans, Northfield City Councilwoman Susan Korngut, and two victim survivors spoke. Marty Torpey, of Cape May, told the group how she lost her son, John, and Khadija Wright, spoke about losing her brother, Lorin.The crowd listens to the speakers.Yunghans, a retired school librarian from Upper Township, explained that in her school district at Hess School in Mays Landing, there were “Code White” drills. Teachers and students learned what to do if there was a potential shooter. It is a drill, she said, that is in every school.It can be so real. Someone, she recalled, would even go around and rattle the doorknobs to make it seem like there was an intruder.It is something, Yunghans said, children should never have to learn about but have to in today’s society.Gun violence is real, and it is everywhere, including in the schools, she emphasized.“I think we live in a wonderful country and so many freedoms and one of the freedoms should be freedom from fear,” she said.In addition to the walk across the Ninth Street Bridge, would be an orange hue across the bridge in the evening, as part of the orange symbol of the anti-gun violence rally throughout the weekend. Orange is a color that is supposed to signify recovery, Yunghans explained.She thanked Ocean City Mayor Jay Gillian for allowing the bridge to be lit in orange.Janet Yunghans, of Upper Township, talks about the need to end gun violence. Standing next to her is Christine Piper, also of Moms Demand Action.When the victim survivors spoke, the crowd was very attentive.Torpey and her husband, Mike, adopted their son, John, in 1975 from Vietnam. He was raised with their two daughters. In 1991 he was accepted into college.The following year, he was murdered in a robbery attempt, Marty Torpey said.“He had a smile that lit up a room. He had friends, liked to bike ride, play baseball and taunt his two sisters,” Marty told the audience.What killed their son was a combination of things, Marty told the marchers. “Greed. Hate. Pain. Poverty and a gun,” she said.Some marchers display strong messages.For Wright, whose brother, Lorin was killed in 1987, she continues to grieve.“We must educate ourselves. We must stop the circle of violence,” she said.Christine Piper, the head of Moms Demand Action, said although the group is relatively small, with about 20 volunteers who attend the meetings, there are more than 100 on the email list.She hopes events such as this one will widen their membership to continue their important anti-violence message.Emily Benson, 18, (foreground) and her sister, Carly, 23, both of Upper Township, say they came to the rally because gun violence is real.Emily Benson, 18, and her older sister, Carly, 23, both of Upper Township, are Ocean City High School graduates.Emily is a second semester college student. Carly just got hired as a teacher in Cape May County. The two have different perspectives. But they both believe young people should not have to live in fear.“Walking through the campus you think about school shootings. It always puts me on guard,” Emily said. “In college, it isn’t like in high school. You are by yourself more on campus.”Her older sister agreed. But she also said as a teacher you get a totally different view of the situation.“You start thinking about how it will impact the children. We have lockdown drills. I think how I would protect the kids,” Carly said. “Sometimes I think it is scarier for older people because kids are naïve.”For Julia Hankerson, of Woodbine, who was one of the first participants to walk onto the footpath of the bridge and wave a sign to beeping motorists, joining the walk against gun violence was something she needed to do.“I think it is really something so positive,” Hankerson said. “I don’t understand why people don’t register guns the same way they register cars. It is that simple.”Julia Hankerson, of Woodine, and Carol Roe, of Marmora, hold up signs to beeping motorists.Khadija Wright displays a sign with her brother Lorin’s story.The rally participants make their way into Ocean City.last_img read more

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D Gibbon invests £100k in new machiney

first_imgSouth Wales bakery D Gibbon and Sons has invested £100k in new machinery for its factory in order to cope with increased business.The manufacturer and wholesale bakery, based in Newport, supplies its own breads, rolls, cakes and confectionery, including its Gibbons Family Bakers brand, as well as national brands such as Hovis, across South Wales and areas of the UK. The money has been spent on two single-rack ovens, which were installed last week, as well as a flow wrapper and an additional van for its fleet. “The new ovens are less labour-intensive, but we will need to take on more staff because production has gone up,” said bakery manager Julian Owen. “We will probably need around four to six people at first, but hopefully it’ll be double figures over the next 12-18 months.”“One of our major customers is Aldi and, in time, we’re looking to set up separate distribution in Swindon (Gloucestershire). At the moment, we supply around 25 stores local to Newport, but we’re hoping to expand on that.” The bakery currently employs around 60 staff, 25-30 of which are in the bakery, and makes around 1,000 deliveries a day.last_img read more

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Dead & Company Debut Dylan Cover In Rockin’ Michigan Performance [Full Audio/Review]

first_imgLast night, Dead & Company rocked Clarkston, MI for another night along their summer tour. In a similar vein as how “Deer Creek,” is more affectionately known, Pine Knob (also known as DTE Energy Music Theatre) was a great venue to see Dead & Company. Nestled amongst many trees and a couple of manmade creeks and mini-waterfalls, Bob, Billy, Mickey, John, Oteil, and Jeff all brought the best for a very special Thursday night.The first set brought the band’s standard excellence with some great moments. The show began with some jamming that eventually led into the opening notes of “Jack Straw.” Always a great opener, this version was unique in that it had an uncharacteristic reggae jam before the final chorus. And after this mellow rhythm, the rocking “Jack Straw from Wichita cut his buddy down!” sounded even more powerful than usual. It was a great way to start the show. Other stellar moments of the first set included a nice “Friend of the Devil” and a “Sugaree” that made for a great sing-a-long, as well as the band’s debut cover of Bob Dylan’s “When I Paint My Masterpiece.” By the time “Sugaree” was played, most fans had finally overcome the massively long lines to enter and were in the venue, filling the lawn and leaving no blade of grass untrodden. Thus, the sing-a-long was fun. “Don’t Ease Me In” closed out the set, and the set itself wasn’t too unfamiliar of a first set the Grateful Dead could have played twenty-five years ago at this same venue.Where the first set was fun and could have been termed pedestrian, the second set took the music to another level. Opening with “Playin’ in the Band,” it didn’t take long for Bob Weir to give the nod to the rest of the musicians signaling improvisation to follow. The jamming was dark before going into “Estimated Prophet.” It was a great rendition, and although it appeared Bobby’s head was about to fall off his shoulders the way he was shaking his head during the tune, all the musical glory goes to John Mayer. Mayer did a great job of hitting some powerful chords at the beginning of the song to denote its beginning. As the song progressed and all the lyrics faded, it was Mayer who was leading the foray into improvisational space, only to be cut short by Weir.It sounded like they would play “Eyes of the World,” but instead a fun “Cumberland Blues” followed. It was during the short jam that I first noticed how salient bassist Oteil Burbridge was by adding some very dark bass lines to the song. It was cool. The next song was “Truckin’,” and the band played a great version of the national treasure of the United States Congress followed. A brief return to “Playin’ in the Band” then led to “Drums” which was very short but interesting because Burbridge and keyboardist Jeff Chimenti joined drummers Bill Kreutzmann and Mickey Hart on the various percussion instruments. It was certainly a fun moment.“Space” had some cool reverb effects from Mayer, who was sitting in front of his amplifier making some crazy sounds and noises with his guitar. From “Space” they went into “The Wheel.” A fun version that had some reggae influences at the end (in the way that Weir has done before with Ratdog), they went into a choice cover with The Beatles’ “Dear Prudence.” The set culminated with a rocking “Casey Jones.” Finally, the band played a quick “Johnny B. Goode,” and with no encore, that was the end of the night.All things considered, the show was fantastic. The venue was beautiful, the Deadheads were congenial, and most importantly the music was Dead. The band will hit up Alpine Valley in Wisconsin, Pittsburgh, and Fenway Park in Boston before heading out West. Be sure to catch Dead and Company if they come around your area. Or better yet, road trip to somewhere they are playing!Check out full audio recording of the performance, courtesy of taper Jeff Frank.Check out the full setlist below, as well as video highlights and a gallery from Ojeda Photography.Edit this setlist | More Dead & Company setlists Load remaining imageslast_img read more

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Find Out Annie Potts’ Favorite Part of Swinging in Pippin

first_img Annie Potts The Tony-winning revival of Pippin is filled with awe-inspiring feats, but one of the musical’s show-stopping moments belongs to Annie Potts. The Emmy nominee is having a ball as the trapeze-swinging, “No Time at All”-belting Berthe, but she must have been nervous about the circus act, right? Nope. Potts swung by Today on February 11, and told hosts Kathie Lee Gifford and Hoda Kotb that the trapeze is her favorite part. “I’m up there with this beautiful boy who is mighty,” she gushed. Potts also talked about her musical theater background, a car accident that almost ended her career and Designing Women. Star Files Pippin Related Shows View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 4, 2015last_img read more

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Sunbelt Expo

first_imgVisitors to the 32nd annual Sunbelt Agricultural Exposition learned about the latest agricultural equipment, technology and information firsthand Oct. 20-22. They also got to watch college deans go udder-to-udder in a milking contest and witness the unexpected birth of baby roaches.The Sunbelt Expo, billed as “North American’s Premier Farm Show,” draws more than 200,000 visitors to Moultrie, Ga., each year to see more than 1,100 exhibitors.The Sunbelt Expo is not just one of the largest farm shows in the world, it’s become a leading educational venue for agriculture, said Scott Angle, UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences dean and director.“From row crops to aquaculture to livestock to home gardening, our faculty’s on-site research trials and seminars are well attended and received throughout the three-day event,” he said. “And each year, we are able tell our story directly to the thousands of visitors who stop by our building here. It’s also a great opportunity to recruit those students who will one day be Georgia’s leaders.”Midday on the first day, visitors to the UGA building got to see a roach in CAES entomologist Paul Guillebeau’s insect display give birth. The dozen or more cloudy-white babies scurried around the display, designed to look like a family kitchen. Though not for everyone, the scene was a rare sight to see live, Guillebeau said.CAES also spotlighted agrosecurity, renewable energy sources, farming conservation, UGA Cooperative Extension, student recruitment and plant breeding, along with live musical entertainment and 4-H Clovers and Company dancers.Angle competed in an old-fashioned milking contest against college of agriculture deans from Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College, Auburn University and the University of Florida. Auburn University College of Agriculture Dean Richard Guthrie squeezed out the victory.Florida cattleman Cary Lightsey won the 20th annual Swisher Sweets/Sunbelt Expo Southeastern Farmer of the Year award, announced each year during a first-day luncheon. Each year, 10 southeastern states each send a farmer to compete for the title. Georgia’s state winner was Tifton vegetable farmer Bill Brim.“Though Bill didn’t win the regional award, he is recognized as an innovator and a well-established leader in Georgia agriculture,” Angle said. “His on-farm collaborations with our college’s research and Extension faculty, particularly with those on our Tifton campus, continue to solve problems for what is a major part of Georgia’s economy.”last_img read more

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Seaport Global analysts project sharp drop in U.S. thermal coal exports in 2019 and 2020

first_imgSeaport Global analysts project sharp drop in U.S. thermal coal exports in 2019 and 2020 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($): U.S. thermal coal exports are expected to fall as much as 12% in 2019 and 25% in 2020 given the declining Northern European delivered price, which will put pressure on the U.S. utility and lower-grade U.S. metallurgical prices, Seaport Global analysts wrote April 8.Since October 2018, when the S&P Global Platts CIF ARA was assessed above $100/t, the price front-month CIF ARA price has dropped about 47% to $55.05/t on April 5. The price level for healthy U.S. exporters, Seaport senior analyst Mark Levin and senior associate analyst Nathan Martin wrote, is between $80/t and $90/t, based off the API2 price, with $75/t as the lower limit to keep exports afloat.On April 5, the analysts noted an API2 price of $74/t.Several U.S. producers have locked in tons into the export market at fixed prices, but “a lot of coal that was previously targeted for the export market could find its way back into the U.S. domestic utility market later [in 2019] and in 2020,” Levin and Martin wrote, which would put extra pressure on U.S. utility prices in heavy thermal export regions such as Northern Appalachia and the Illinois Basin.Approximately 54 million tonnes were exported into Europe and Asia when the front-month price averaged $92/t for the year, compared with exports averaging 35 million tonnes in the preceding five years when the price averaged $72/t.Levin and Martin listed a mild winter in Europe, weak natural gas prices, restriction in Australian imports into China, along with more Russian coal making its way into Europe as reasons why the price has dropped so significantly.More ($): Seaport: Falling U.S. thermal coal exports to put pressure on local utility marketlast_img read more

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Impact of Paper Products

first_imgDear EarthTalk: Are any major brands of disposable tissues, paper towels, napkins and toilet paper yet using recycled content and chlorine-free bleaching? — Sylvia Comstock, Montpelier, VTNot many. In fact, some of the biggest names in disposable paper products are the worst offenders. According to the nonprofit Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), forests at home and abroad are being destroyed to make toilet paper, facial tissues, paper towels and other disposable paper products. Giant paper producers such as Kimberly-Clark (Scott, Cottonelle, Kleenex and Viva) and Procter & Gamble (Puffs, Charmin and Bounty) are, in the words of NRDC, “forcing the destruction of our continent’s most vibrant forests, and devastating the habitat for countless wildlife species in the process.”Much of the virgin pulp used by these large manufacturers comes from Canada’s boreal forest. Some 500,000 acres of boreal forest in Ontario and Alberta alone—key habitat for caribou, lynx, wolves and scores of birds—are felled each year to provide pulp for disposable paper. Beyond wildlife concerns, Canada’s boreal forest, which stretches from coast to coast, comprises perhaps the world’s largest terrestrial storehouse of carbon dioxide, so it is critical to keep it intact to help mitigate global warming.Kimberly-Clark uses some 1.1 million cubic meters of trees from Canada’s boreal forests each year to produce 465,000 metric tons of pulp. Only 19 percent of the pulp it uses to make home use disposable paper products comes from recycled sources. Some of its brands, including Kleenex and Scott, contain no recycled content whatsoever. Nor do Procter and Gamble’s Bounty, Charmin or Puffs, says NRDC.Another issue with tissue (and paper overall) is the use of chlorine for whitening. Chlorine used in many bleaching processes contributes to the formation of dioxins and furans, chemicals that end up in our air and water and can cause cancer. Safer processes use oxygen compounds and result in paper that is “totally chlorine free,” “process chlorine free” (chlorine free except for recycled fibers that were previously chlorine-bleached) or “elemental chlorine free,” which substitutes safer chlorine dioxide for chlorine.NRDC and other groups are pressuring the tissue products industry to change its ways, and are working to educate consumers about their options when buying tissue paper products. NRDC’s online “Shopper’s Guide to Home Tissue Products” offers reams of free advice on which brands to look for—and which to avoid. Marcal is the only household name that NRDC rates high on paper sourcing (100 percent recycled and 40 to 60 percent post-consumer content) and chlorine use (process chlorine-free). Brands ranking highest (up to 80 percent post-consumer content and process-chlorine free) include 365 (the Whole Foods brand), Seventh Generation, Earth First, and Planet, among others. No brands are totally chlorine free.In general, consumers should seek out brands that specifically tout use of 100 percent recycled materials with a high percentage (40 percent or more) of post-consumer waste, and not just keywords like “green” or “eco” on their labels, which may be misleading. Also, before you even purchase that next roll of disposable paper think about how you can reduce the amount you use in the first place. Paper tissues, towels and napkins, for example, have re-usable options in handkerchiefs and cotton towels and napkins.CONTACTS: NRDC Shopper’s Guide to Home Tissue Products, www.nrdc.org/land/forests/gtissue.asp; Kimberly-Clark, www.kimberly-clark.com; Procter & Gamble, www.pg.com.GOT AN ENVIRONMENTAL QUESTION? Send it to: EarthTalk, c/o E/The Environmental Magazine, P.O. Box 5098, Westport, CT 06881; submit it at: www.emagazine.com/earthtalk/thisweek/, or e-mail: [email protected] Read past columns at: www.emagazine.com/earthtalk/archives.php.last_img read more

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Toxic algae is spreading and killing dogs in the southeast

first_imgLook for foam or scum on the water and blue, red, vibrant green or brown colors on top of the water that can resemble spilled paint. Toxic algae can also smell very bad, though animals may be attracted to the odor. North Anna Branch (CONTAINS CHANGES FROM PRIOR ADVISORY; “UPPER” ADDED AND “LOWER” REMOVED) The Virginia Department of Health posted swimming advisories for the following areas of the lake along with safety tips. SEE MAP. Upper – From the upper inundated waters of the Pamunkey arm of the lake downstream to the confluence with Terry’s RunMiddle – From the confluence of Terry’s Run with Pamunkey Creek downstream to Rt. 612 (Stubbs Bridge)Terrys Run – from the upper inundated waters of the lake downstream to the confluence with Pamunkey Creek Pamunkey Branch (NO CHANGE FROM PRIOR ADVISORY) Recent warm water conditions make favorable conditions for an algae bloom. The toxic algae can bloom in freshwater and saltwater and may be hard to spot. The Department of Health advises the public to avoid contact with the Upper and Middle Pamunkey Branches as well as the Upper and Middle North Anna Branches of Lake Anna. Photo from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife: A blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) bloom at Clear Lake, Lake County, California, resulted in oxygen depletion in the water and the subsequent mortality of multiple aquatic species, including carp, catfish, bluegill and crappie. CDFW photos taken Aug. 1, 2016 by Kirsten Macintyre.https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ Routine monitoring occurs monthly above Route 208 on Lake Anna. Test results indicate samples collected on July 30 at sites within these areas contained potentially harmful algae (cyanobacteria) that exceed safe swimming levels. According to WDBJ the Virginia Department of Health said the same toxic algae has been spotted in the counties of Orange, Louisa and Spotsylvania County. Dog owners: beware. A toxic blue-green algae known as cyanobacteria has killed four dogs in North Carolina and Georgia this week. The dogs died after swimming in, and most likely drinking, algae-contaminated water, leading to liver failure.  Toxic algae is killing dogs in the southeast Cyanobacteria can cause skin rash and gastrointestinal illness, such as upset stomach, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. If you have been exposed to contaminated water, wash off with fresh water as soon as possible and monitor symptoms. Upper – From the upper inundated waters of the North Anna arm of the lake downstream to the Rt. 522 Bridge.Middle – From the Rt. 522 Bridge downstream to the Lumsden Flats / Rose Valley cove Symptoms of exposure in dogs include diarrhea, vomiting, weakness, drooling, difficulty breathing or seizures. If your dog experiences any of these symptoms, take the animal directly to the vet.  Avoid contact with any area of the lake where water is green or an advisory sign is posted,Do not allow children or pets to drink from natural bodies of water.Keep children and pets out of the areas experiencing a harmful algae bloom and quickly wash them off with plenty of fresh, clean water after coming into contact with algae scum or bloom water.If you or your animals experience symptoms after swimming in or near an algal bloom, seek medical/veterinarian care.To ensure fish fillets are safe to eat, properly clean fish by removing skin and discarding all internal organs, and cooking fish to the proper temperature.If you suspect you experienced health-related effects following exposure to a bloom, contact the Virginia Harmful Algal Bloom Hotline at 1-888-238-6154.To learn more about harmful algae blooms or to report an algae bloom or fish kill visit www.SwimHealthyVA.com. WHEN IN DOUBT, STAY OUT!last_img read more

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Long Island Potholes Worse Than Last Year

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Nearly five feet of snow has fallen on Long Island amid an especially harsh winter, opening up more potholes on local roadways than the moon has craters—frustrating drivers and road crews.The cost of pothole repairs on roadways maintained by New York State in Nassau and Suffolk counties has nearly quadrupled from $354,877 last year to $1,397,193 so far this year, according to the state Department of Transportation. Driver advocates and government officials on both sides of the county line also report increases this season.“Oh, it’s definitely worse this year,” said Chris McBride, the Community Transportation Specialist for the American Automobile Association (AAA). “I’ve noticed throughout January, and now into February, a lot more potholes than usual. It’s like a minefield out there.”Nearly 59 inches of snow has fallen on the region as of early March, well above the average of about 20 inches by now, according to Upton-based National Weather Service forecasters.Potholes are formed when water seeps below the pavement, freezes, expands and causes the asphalt above to bend and crack. The pressure of thousands of vehicles running over the weakened point in the roadway then causes the street to crumble. Areas where water is closer to the surface tend to have more potholes.The cycle turned stretches of Long Island Expressway, among other roadways, into Swiss cheese.“In just two days [in February], crews used 136 tons of asphalt to repair potholes on the Long Island Expressway,” said Eileen Peters, the LI regional spokeswoman for the state transportation department. She added that the agency has responded to over a 1,000 pothole reports.Nassau and Suffolk county officials said the price tag for pothole repairs was not yet available, but there were signs that this year is worse than before in both counties.“As of the middle of last week, we received 88 pothole complaints [for Suffolk roads], which were up 10 percent from last year,” Vanessa Baird-Streeter, a Suffolk spokeswoman, said last month. “We’re trying to repair the potholes as quickly as possible… however, you have to be very cognizant of the roadways.”Michael Martino, a spokesman for the Nassau County Department of Public Works, said his agency has responded to more than 100 calls as of early March.“The majority of pothole reports received by the County are for non-County roads,” he added.Hempstead town officials declared “war on potholes” after a Levittown man reportedly started filling the holes himself out of frustration.The AAA’s McBride said his group usually receives the most calls about potholes toward the end of the winter season. But, because of the repeated snowstorms that has have pounded the region, pothole complaints have come in sooner than expected.“There’s certain stretches of roads where you tend to get a lot of them,” he said. “Those areas are just a lot worse than normal this year.”With two more weeks of winter left before the spring solstice—and the possibility of more snow beyond that—McBride warns drivers to slow down and be on the lookout for potholes to avoid damage to their vehicles.“Obey the speed limit,” he said. “Keep your speeds down because it will give you more time to react if there is a pothole in front of you.”To report potholes call the NYS Pothole hotline at 1-800-POTHOLE.last_img read more

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More data doesn’t make a better CEO

first_img 178SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Ask for predictive insight rather than historical data. This practice guards against another problem CEOs face as they gather information from their teams: almost all the data they get is about what has already happened, not what will happen.Therefore, one of the best forms of data the CEO can collect is the answer to this simple question: “Will your group achieve its goals on time?” In answering, the functional leader can mentally place his or her group’s data in the context of organizational priorities (step 1) and make an informed forecast.If you’d like to get some specific best practices on how to get useful, forward-looking insight from your team, I hope you’ll join us on May 24, 2015, at 1:00pm EDT for a webinar: “Why Big Data Isn’t What CEOs Need.” You can register here. Hope to see you there! As you have surely heard many times over the past few years, big data is opening a lot of doors for modern organizations. Leaders are told again and again about the virtues of being “data driven.”But the many valid uses of big data aside, it’s even more important for CEOs and leaders to guard themselves against the data deluge. I recently saw a presentation by Frank Spencer, founding principle and creative director of Kedge, and one of his slides hit the nail on the head. It read: “Data-driven approaches become a worn and familiar blanket that leaves us vulnerable to threats while blinding us to new opportunities.”If you jump into the deep end of the data pool, you will very likely reduce your ability to lead your credit union with focus. Big data is great when you have massive, highly variable data sets and machines making the decisions—but it doesn’t necessarily help CEOs lead their organizations day to day.No matter how smart you are, it’s impossible to expect that you can grasp all the functional data generated by the organization—from accounting, lending, marketing, HR, and so on. With the volume of enterprise data projected to grow 50x year-over-year between now and 2020, CEOs are at risk of losing the signal in the noise.If you’ve led as many executive team meetings as I have, you know the pain point here: slide after slide, graph after graph, and the feeling that you’re getting a lot of spin and very little insight about what you really want to know: Are we on track as an organization? Will we meet our objectives?Here’s the approach I advise CEOs to take to ensure they’re getting not just loads of information, but the information they need to run the credit union well: Set clear priorities and metrics to collect data against. The best way to guard against a bottoms-up flow of too much data is to reverse it and come at the problem from the top down. As CEO, ensure that you’ve established a clear destination for the organization, broken that into a few success criteria, and asked functional leaders to communicate their department’s data in terms of those criteria.last_img read more

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