Bill Berloni Will Bring His Broadway Dogs to Reality TV Series

first_imgTony Award honoree Bill Berloni is bringing puppy love to the small screen. The Broadway animal trainer will headline a new reality TV series on Discovery Family Channel beginning in August, Variety reports. The current working title for the series is From Wags to Riches with Bill Berloni.The program will follow Berloni’s involvement on the Great White Way, as well as his life as an animal rights activist and his home life—with the 25 plus animals he’s rescued and sheltered personally.This season, pups trained by Berloni can be seen in The Audience and Living on Love. Hs numerous additional credits include Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill, Bullets Over Broadway, Legally Blonde and Gypsy. He got his start in 1977 when he rescued and trained the dogs for the original production of Annie (he has since served as the animal trainer for both Broadway revivals and the 2014 remake).Take a look below as Audra McDonald and Berloni audition dogs to play Pepe in last season’s Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill. View Commentslast_img read more

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Family-style fun

first_imgBy Diane BalesUniversity of Georgia Mealtimes are one of the best opportunities to help children grow and learn. Families can share conversation and time together, while teaching healthy eating habits in a relaxed environment. Many families are so busy they, unfortunately, don’t set regular times to eat together. Here are some easy steps to set a routine to make family mealtimes possible and enjoyable.Pick consistent days and times. Reserve the time on your calendar and rearrange other commitments so everyone can be there. If schedules are too busy, start by choosing one or two evenings a week to have dinner as a family. Eat at the table. Children tend to get distracted easily. Sitting down at the table helps children focus on their food and pay attention to the family conversation. Make a rule that distractions such as television and cell phones are not allowed at the dinner table.Serve “family-style” whenever possible. Put the food in serving containers on the table, and encourage everyone, including young children, to use serving utensils to put food on their plates. Family-style service may seem like a lot of trouble, but it actually helps children practice motor skills and begins teaching them how to take control of the amount of food they eat. Teach portions. Many children don’t know what a portion looks like. You can guide children while still allowing them to serve themselves by saying things like, “Take just one piece of chicken for now. If you are still hungry after you eat that chicken, you can have more.” A young child’s portion is smaller than one for a teenager or an adult.Handle spills casually. Eating with a fork or spoon is a skill that requires practice. Young children are still learning how to control their hand and finger muscles. They might spill or drop food. Putting a plastic mat under your child’s chair can help contain the mess. When spills happen, stay calm. Acknowledge that everyone spills sometimes. Get your child to help clean it up and continue with the meal. Keep a wet cloth handy to make spills less distracting.Talk with your children. Mealtime is a great chance to share ideas and thoughts and to encourage children’s language development by involving them in conversations. Ask children questions and encourage them to answer. You can also model conversations by including children – even infants and toddlers – in discussions. Even if you and your child are the only ones sharing the meal, be sure to spend some time talking.Encourage children to try new foods, but don’t force them. Many young children are reluctant to try new foods, and will eat familiar foods first. Help your children ease into accepting new foods step by step. Introduce only one new food at a meal. Pair a food they’ve never tried with one they like. Start with smooth-textured foods like corn, chicken or pears. Cut new food into bite-sized pieces to make them easier to handle. Describe the new food, teach children its name and talk about what it looks like. Encourage them to touch and smell it if they are not ready to taste it yet. Remember that children are more likely to try a new food if they see you enjoying it. Be realistic about the length of the meal. Young children have very short attention spans. Don’t be surprised if your toddler or four-year-old is finished eating after a few minutes. Encourage children to sit with the family for a few minutes if others are still eating, but allow them to get up and do another activity nearby when they get impatient or squirmy. Having a few simple toys close to the table will enable children to be near the rest of the family while they finish the meal.Keep mealtime routines consistent. Children’s brains develop best through repetition. Do the same things in the same order every time you eat a meal together. Over time, children will learn what to expect at mealtime. The predictable routine will help them feel comfortable and secure.You don’t have to serve gourmet food. Even a simple, healthy meal like chicken and rice can be an enjoyable family gathering if you take time to follow a consistent mealtime routine.(Diane Bales is a human development specialist with University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and the College of Family and Consumer Sciences.)last_img read more

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Vermont Health Insurance Assistance Program awarded $227,000 grant

first_imgNearly $227,000 of new funding is being distributed to the Vermont State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP) to help Medicare beneficiaries in Vermont get more information about their health care choices.The funds are part of the $35.8 million being distributed to the 54 SHIPs that provide Medicare beneficiaries with local, personalized assistance on a wide variety of Medicare and health insurance topics. The Vermont State Health Insurance Program serves an important role in providing information and support to people with Medicare all across Vermont, said CMS Acting Administrator Charlene Frizzera. This new funding will help to ensure that the Vermont SHIP continues to work with local governments, community-based organizations and other partners in Vermont to help meet the needs of our Medicare beneficiaries.CMS expects the SHIPs to use the 2009 funding to conduct targeted community-based outreach to people with Medicare who may be unable to access other sources of information. SHIPs will also provide outreach and assistance to current and newly eligible Medicare beneficiaries and their caregivers, with a special emphasis on reaching people who will most likely be eligible for Medicare s low-income subsidy if they enroll in Medicare prescription drug coverage.The Vermont State Health Insurance Program will use grant funds in part to continue to partner with the Vermont Center for Independent Living, disease advocacy groups, community action agencies, public welfare offices, veteran s groups and faith-based organizations to reach beneficiaries under the age of 65 with disabilities. The Vermont SHIP will also focus on hard to reach rural populations by working with case management staff, nutrition and information and assistance specialists and family caregiver specialists at the Area Agencies on Aging (AAAs) across the state.CMS will continue to support the quality of services provided by SHIPs through training, technical assistance, the SHIP Resource Center, and the online tools at www.medicare.gov(link is external) to assist people with Medicare.last_img read more

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Panamá and Colombia Cooperate to Fight Drug Traffickers and Improve Border Security

first_imgTo underscore the close ties between the two countries, Panamá was the first country Colombian Minister of Defense Juan Carlos Pinzón visited during his September 2013 tour of Central America and the Caribbean. During his visit, which included a meeting with Panamanian Minister of Public Security José Raúl Mulino, Pinzón said he was in Panamá to “strengthen the treaties on cooperation and exchanges of information, and to increase the training levels for members of the Armed Forces.” President Juan Carlos Verela Rodriguez visited the border of Panama and Colombia November 21 to celebrate State Border Service (Senafront)’s sixth anniversary, as well as the graduation of 40 anti-narcoterrorism officers, 35 border patrol agents and nine combat swimmers. In their mission, the graduates are also likely to find themselves working in cooperation with the security forces of Colombia. Their collaborative efforts have led to multiple victories against drug trafficking along the border. Collaboration between the two countries is helping security forces combat drug trafficking by the terrorist Revolutionary Armed Force of Colombia (FARC) and other criminal organizations. Silver, who was also wanted by Panamanian authorities, had three Colombian arrest warrants pending for rebellion, kidnapping, terrorism, causing personal injuries, and murder. The United States Department of Justice had also submitted a request for his extradition. The arrests and killings “of significant criminals are definitely the results of agreements between the two countries as part of bilateral cooperation in the fight against threats posted by transnational crime,” Masse said. “Security forces, government agencies and civilian organizations must cooperate and periodically review and evaluate security threats to create preventive mechanisms in order to protect their citizens’ security.” Silver, who was also wanted by Panamanian authorities, had three Colombian arrest warrants pending for rebellion, kidnapping, terrorism, causing personal injuries, and murder. The United States Department of Justice had also submitted a request for his extradition. The arrests and killings “of significant criminals are definitely the results of agreements between the two countries as part of bilateral cooperation in the fight against threats posted by transnational crime,” Masse said. “Security forces, government agencies and civilian organizations must cooperate and periodically review and evaluate security threats to create preventive mechanisms in order to protect their citizens’ security.” For example, in two separate join operations in September, security forces from the two countries and the United States seized more than 800 kilos of cocaine from vessels in Panamanian waters in the Pacific Ocean. About a week later, on September 25, Colombian Anti-Narcotics Police, the Colombian Navy and agents with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) cooperating through Operation MARTILLO arrested 13 alleged drug traffickers and seized 740 kilos of cocaine from a ship in Caribbean waters off the coast of Panamá. Law enforcement officials transported the suspected narco-traffickers, who are all Colombian nationals, to Florida to face federal drug trafficking charges. In their mission, the graduates are also likely to find themselves working in cooperation with the security forces of Colombia. Their collaborative efforts have led to multiple victories against drug trafficking along the border. In another victory, the Colombian Air Force, in cooperation with the Colombian National Police (PNC) attacked a FARC campsite and killed Virgilio Antonio Vidal Mora, who was known as “Silver,” during a security operation near the Panamanian border in August 2013. Security forces also killed two other FARC operatives and recovered 15 rifles, El Tiempo reported. For example, in October 2013, police in Panamá captured YamilMosquera Horado, also known as “Alexis” — the alleged leader of the 57th Front of the FARC. They captured him when he and other alleged FARC operatives tried to flee from Panamanian border officers. Improved training has helped security forces from Panamá and Colombia capture a number of drug traffickers since the two countries agreed to the binational strategy. In addition to capturing Alexis and the other suspects, police seized about 100 kilograms of cocaine and a rifle. Panamá and Colombia have been cooperating closely to fight narco-trafficking, improve security along the border the two countries share, and conduct joint training exercises for nearly four years. In February 2011, Colombia’s Minister of Defense at the time, Rodrigo Rivera, met with then-Secretary of Public Security of Panamá, José Raúl Mulino, to sign a Binational Border Security Plan. Rivera and Murino agreed to develop coordinated and synchronized operations along the border, to strengthen both countries’ ability to respond to combat the trafficking of drugs, humans, and weapons. President Juan Carlos Verela Rodriguez visited the border of Panama and Colombia November 21 to celebrate State Border Service (Senafront)’s sixth anniversary, as well as the graduation of 40 anti-narcoterrorism officers, 35 border patrol agents and nine combat swimmers. “Our units at the check point detected the presence of 4 or 5 persons who, when they were ordered to halt, opened fire on our units,” said Panamanian National Border Service Director Frank Alexis Abrego. “Our units responded with gunfire, encircled the suspects, advanced on their position and located Alexis.” In February 2011, Colombia’s Minister of Defense at the time, Rodrigo Rivera, met with then-Secretary of Public Security of Panamá, José Raúl Mulino, to sign a Binational Border Security Plan. Rivera and Murino agreed to develop coordinated and synchronized operations along the border, to strengthen both countries’ ability to respond to combat the trafficking of drugs, humans, and weapons. Close ties include joint training exercises Collaboration between the two countries is helping security forces combat drug trafficking by the terrorist Revolutionary Armed Force of Colombia (FARC) and other criminal organizations. To underscore the close ties between the two countries, Panamá was the first country Colombian Minister of Defense Juan Carlos Pinzón visited during his September 2013 tour of Central America and the Caribbean. During his visit, which included a meeting with Panamanian Minister of Public Security José Raúl Mulino, Pinzón said he was in Panamá to “strengthen the treaties on cooperation and exchanges of information, and to increase the training levels for members of the Armed Forces.” Silver was responsible for trafficking drugs and weapons for the FARC along the Colombia-Panamá border. Intelligence gathered by the PNC revealed the location of the campsite, according to Maj. Gen. al Guillermo León León, commander of the Colombian Air Force. “In this operation, which was performed jointly with the National Police, we were able to gather very accurate intelligence, and execute a very well calculated operation using FAC planes, with the result that Silver was neutralized,” León said. . For instance, in February, the Colombian Air Force (FAC) and the Panamanian National Air Service (Senam) conducted a week-long aerial exercise in combatting drug trafficking, called Pancol I-Binational Air Interdiction Exercise. Other countries, such as Guatemala, Honduras, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Brazil and Perú have previously conducted similar training exercises. The goal of these drills is to train to fight drug trafficking and to maintain a uniform aeronautics language among the air forces of different countries, to ensure maximum effectiveness. In addition to conducting joint training exercises, the Binational Border Security Plan calls for Panamá and Colombia to work cooperation to protect indigenous communities that live along the border the two countries share from explosives used by the FARC, and to protect them forced recruitment into the ranks of the terrorist group. In addition to capturing Alexis and the other suspects, police seized about 100 kilograms of cocaine and a rifle. “Each and every one of you are key to the development of our national security strategy, crime prevention and combating serious international crime,” he said. Close ties include joint training exercises For instance, in February, the Colombian Air Force (FAC) and the Panamanian National Air Service (Senam) conducted a week-long aerial exercise in combatting drug trafficking, called Pancol I-Binational Air Interdiction Exercise. Other countries, such as Guatemala, Honduras, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Brazil and Perú have previously conducted similar training exercises. The goal of these drills is to train to fight drug trafficking and to maintain a uniform aeronautics language among the air forces of different countries, to ensure maximum effectiveness. In addition to conducting joint training exercises, the Binational Border Security Plan calls for Panamá and Colombia to work cooperation to protect indigenous communities that live along the border the two countries share from explosives used by the FARC, and to protect them forced recruitment into the ranks of the terrorist group. “Each and every one of you are key to the development of our national security strategy, crime prevention and combating serious international crime,” he said. Successes by security forces “In this operation, which was performed jointly with the National Police, we were able to gather very accurate intelligence, and execute a very well calculated operation using FAC planes, with the result that Silver was neutralized,” León said. . Joint training exercises are also part of the improved cooperation between the two countries. “Our units at the check point detected the presence of 4 or 5 persons who, when they were ordered to halt, opened fire on our units,” said Panamanian National Border Service Director Frank Alexis Abrego. “Our units responded with gunfire, encircled the suspects, advanced on their position and located Alexis.” A military-police operation kills FARC leader ‘Silver’ Panamá and Colombia have been cooperating closely to fight narco-trafficking, improve security along the border the two countries share, and conduct joint training exercises for nearly four years. By Dialogo November 26, 2014 A military-police operation kills FARC leader ‘Silver’ For example, in October 2013, police in Panamá captured YamilMosquera Horado, also known as “Alexis” — the alleged leader of the 57th Front of the FARC. They captured him when he and other alleged FARC operatives tried to flee from Panamanian border officers. Silver was responsible for trafficking drugs and weapons for the FARC along the Colombia-Panamá border. Intelligence gathered by the PNC revealed the location of the campsite, according to Maj. Gen. al Guillermo León León, commander of the Colombian Air Force. “Cooperation, exchanges of information and the use of intelligence between the two countries is important if we are to continue to strike hard blows against these outlaws,” said Frédéric Massé, director of the Research and Special Projects Center at the Externado University of Colombia. Joint training exercises are also part of the improved cooperation between the two countries. For example, in two separate join operations in September, security forces from the two countries and the United States seized more than 800 kilos of cocaine from vessels in Panamanian waters in the Pacific Ocean. About a week later, on September 25, Colombian Anti-Narcotics Police, the Colombian Navy and agents with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) cooperating through Operation MARTILLO arrested 13 alleged drug traffickers and seized 740 kilos of cocaine from a ship in Caribbean waters off the coast of Panamá. Law enforcement officials transported the suspected narco-traffickers, who are all Colombian nationals, to Florida to face federal drug trafficking charges. In another victory, the Colombian Air Force, in cooperation with the Colombian National Police (PNC) attacked a FARC campsite and killed Virgilio Antonio Vidal Mora, who was known as “Silver,” during a security operation near the Panamanian border in August 2013. Security forces also killed two other FARC operatives and recovered 15 rifles, El Tiempo reported. Successes by security forces Improved training has helped security forces from Panamá and Colombia capture a number of drug traffickers since the two countries agreed to the binational strategy. “Cooperation, exchanges of information and the use of intelligence between the two countries is important if we are to continue to strike hard blows against these outlaws,” said Frédéric Massé, director of the Research and Special Projects Center at the Externado University of Colombia. last_img read more

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Monitoring consumer review sites is key to managing financial institution’s reputation

first_imgIn the not so distant past, if you had a bad experience at the credit union, you might go home and tell your spouse or your neighbor. If you were really upset, perhaps you wrote a letter of complaint, but that might be the extent of it. Likewise, if you loved a certain business or product, you may have recommended it to your friends and family.We know, for fact, that personal recommendations influence buying decisions.But today, we live in a digital world, and these gripes or recommendations take place across the web, instantaneously. Online reviews are increasingly important, both to consumers and the businesses subject to their review. Monitoring review sites should be an integral part of your institution’s social media and reputation management strategy.Research is the first step toward a customer buying a product or service, and online reviews–from describing how a particular product stood the test of time or which restaurant has the best burgers in town–play a huge role in this process. continue reading » 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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NAFCU monitors CHOICE Act mark-up today

first_imgNAFCU will closely monitor the House Financial Services Committee mark-up of the Financial CHOICE Act (H.R. 10), slated for 10 a.m. Eastern today. The association will keep members apprised of any changes potentially affecting credit unions and their members.On Monday, NAFCU Executive Vice President of Government Affairs and General Counsel Carrie Hunt urged committee leaders to support the legislation and told them that maintaining the Durbin amendment repeal provision is important and that the association urges members to oppose any attempt to remove the provision from the bill.The CHOICE Act contains numerous NAFCU-sought measures, including Durbin interchange amendment repeal and other Dodd-Frank Act reforms. Two separate hearings were held on the bill last week, one of them often citing the Dodd-Frank’s impact on the current regulatory environment and credit unions.The CHOICE Act would require regulatory agencies to improve their cost-benefit analyses and better tailor regulations to the size of regulated institutions. It would also, as urged by NAFCU, preserve the NCUA Board’s current three-member structure (last year, a five-member board was contemplated) and mandate agency budget transparency. However, there are also areas of concern, such as a proposal to subject the NCUA to congressional appropriations. continue reading » 10SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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A preparedness trifecta: Why are we missing such teachable moments?

first_img(CIDRAP Source Weekly Briefing) – Three very different events in the past 2 weeks underscore that pandemic preparedness fatigue may have evolved into pandemic lethargy—and important lessons are being lost in the process.The events include:Congress, together with the Bush administration, cutting $650 million in 2007 pandemic preparedness fundingWales dealing with an outbreak of avian influenza (H7N2) in poultry, which led to humans becoming sick after contact with infected birds, and then likely subsequent person-to-person transmission of the illnessThe much-publicized episode of an Atlanta lawyer taking two transatlantic flights while he was infected with extensively drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB)What, you may ask, does this trifecta of events have to do with H5N1 infection and the next pandemic?The events tell us much about our current state of preparedness for the next pandemic—whatever influenza virus causes it—and the public’s state of mind regarding what priority we place on getting better prepared for that pandemic. Let me explain.Teachable moment #1: Keep your eyes wide open, even if others shut theirsWhat would have been a big flu story 18 months ago drew a big yawn from the media last week. Not one media venue in the United States (except CIDRAP News) covered the fact that Congress, in conjunction with the White House, deleted $650 million for pandemic preparedness from the 2007 emergency spending bill that was subsequently signed by President Bush May 25.Why does this matter? These funds were largely dedicated for vaccines, antivirals, medical supplies, and diagnostic and surveillance tools—a critical part of the nation’s overall preparedness effort. They represent part of the initial commitment that the president made in November 2005 to provide at least $7.1 billion for pandemic preparedness.The cuts are bad enough—but what is even worse is that the media dozed right through it. The teachable moment—that deleting such critical funding is truly short-sighted—came and went. Jay Rosen, the former chair of the Department of Journalism at New York University, once wrote: “Philosophers disagree on whether a tree falling in the forest makes a sound, if no ear hears it. But it is certain that the tree does not make news.”Teachable moment #2: Watch your back and your front and your sidesThe outbreak of H7N2 avian influenza in poultry in Wales may seem insignificant in terms of the number of people affected (12 so far) and its severity (eye infections and a nonserious flulike illness). But such an outbreak is exactly the type of situation that could sneak up on us and suddenly produce the next pandemic influenza virus.The British public health officials appear to have responded to this situation with a comprehensive and timely intervention, but the outbreak is nonetheless worrisome. The teachable moment lost: There will be a next pandemic, and it might not be due to the H5N1 virus. Unfortunately, the world’s media was mostly AWOL on reporting the true significance of this situation.Teachable moment #3: An emerging pandemic cannot be stoppedThe final event of the preparedness trifecta relates to the recent XDR-TB case that has captured the world’s media attention. Ironically, the risk of this patient’s transmitting TB to his fellow passengers was likely very low. Granted, if XDR-TB is transmitted to any of the passengers, the consequences will be high, given the serious outcome of this infection. Today such an infection carries at least a 60% risk of death within a year of the first appearance of symptoms.The circumstances surrounding this event and their implications deserve many words of discussion, though I can’t cover all the ramifications here. I do have to say that I’m troubled by the public’s perception that if the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had just done its job correctly, this infected passenger would never have made it on a plane. I’m troubled because such a perception plays right into the idea that we don’t need to do much more to prepare for these types of events; just do our job. Of course this is dead wrong. The issue that truly deserves examination is the fact that a single passenger with a diagnosed infectious disease stretched our country’s public health capacity to detect and respond to it.When we see the onset of the next pandemic, individuals who are infected with the pandemic virus but not yet ill are likely to be scrambling to leave the geographic area where the pandemic is emerging. They will get on planes and will infect other passengers. Count on many such passengers in those early days. This is one of the reasons that I never have had any faith in our ability to stop an emerging pandemic in the country in which it begins.The lost teachable moment could have helped the public understand that: Trying to stop a respiratory-transmitted infectious disease (such as pandemic influenza) from hopping continents by identifying infected passengers is doomed to fail. Unfortunately, this discussion has been all but absent from the deliberations of the day.Keep the issue front and centerThese events highlight the challenge we have in keeping pandemic preparedness on the front burner. As disappointing as these current events may be with regard to preparedness, we have no choice but to slug it out every day in the preparedness trenches and use every teachable opportunity to further the preparedness agenda.Our future depends on it.—Michael Osterholmlast_img read more

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Littlewoods stays put as M&S keeps looking

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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S. Korea reports lowest coronavirus cases since new wave of outbreaks last month

first_imgSouth Korea on Monday reported 50 new coronavirus cases, the lowest since a new wave of outbreaks emerged from a church and a large political rally last month.The Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency (KDCA) posted a double-digit rise in daily infections for a third consecutive day. Of the new cases, 40 were domestic and 10 imported, and total infections rose to 23,661, with 406 deaths.The numbers were the lowest since Aug. 11, just before a new cluster of infections emerged from a church whose members attended an anti-government rally in Seoul on Aug. 15, which had boosted the daily tally to more than 440 late last month. The outbreaks have prompted the government to take unprecedented social distancing measures including a ban on on-sight nighttime dining.Some of the rules have been eased in recent weeks after the rate of daily infections slowed, but officials were still on high alert ahead of the Korean thanksgiving holidays of Chuseok this week, when tens of millions of people travel across the country.The government said the social distancing rules will remain in place during the holidays, calling for people to refrain from trips and gatherings, and warning against any large rallies including a “drive-thru” protest.Some 137 demonstrations planned by some civic groups have already been banned, said Son Young-rae, a senior official at the health ministry. Topics :center_img Health authorities have said the daily cases need to be maintained around 50 or less for the rules to be relaxed, and would review the policy after the holidays.”We’ve already seen how COVID-19 spread quickly during previous holidays and its consequences,” Son told a briefing. “How we handle virus control during the upcoming holidays would affect the trend in the autumn and winter.”last_img read more

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Attorney and political activists denies involvement in passport scam

first_img 12 Views   no discussions Share Sharing is caring! LocalNews Attorney and political activists denies involvement in passport scam by: – June 6, 2011 Sharecenter_img Share Tweet Attorney at Law & political activist Mr. Bernard Wiltshire. Photo credit: uwpdm.comOn June 2, 2011 it was reported that Attorney at Law and political activist Mr. Bernard Wiltshire had been arrested on suspicion of involvement in a passport scam in Dominica and that he was assisting the police with their investigation.It was further reported that Mr. Wiltshire may have been the recommender on one of the passport forms and made a declaration that the photograph was a true photograph of the applicant.However, Mr. Wiltshire has denied claims of his involvement in what is believed to be a passport scam in Dominica.Bernard Wiltshire who was questioned by the police last Thursday and subsequently detained for ten hours by the police explained that he signed a passport form in 2006 for a man believed to be a citizen of the Commonwealth of Dominica.In a statement on Friday, Wiltshire said he was merely assisting a man who claimed that he had lost his passport, and was unaware that the individual was a scammer.“I had nothing to do with any passport scam. I knew nothing about it. The police never accused me. Some gentleman came to me in 2006 and asked me to do a statutory declaration because he had lost his passport. He filled out his passport form and he asked me if I could sign the form on his behalf. He also had an old passport…this man had committed three scams…I didn’t know the person really…except that I think I had been introduced to him before,” he said in an interview with Kairi FM radio.Dominica Vibes News will provide further reports and updates on this story.Dominica Vibes Newslast_img read more

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