Racial diversity is a business problem

first_img Comments are closed. HR can help in the CRE’s drive for racial equality by promoting it to the boardas a business necessity. We learn how Trevor Phillips, the organisation’s newchief, plans to target the private sector as a priority, by Paul NelsonThe new head of the Commission for Racial Equality (CRE) realises howpowerful an image can be. When Personnel Today met Trevor Phillips, ex-television journalist andproducer, he was adamant that he wouldn’t pose for photos in front of the CRE’sblack and white holding hands logo. It is “too simplistic”, he said,before vowing to scrap it and replace it with an emblem that better sums up thechallenge for racial harmony in multi-cultural Britain. Phillips is certainly keen to advance the CRE’s cause. He plans to targetthe private sector for a serious improvement in race relations, because theyare not directly covered by race legislation. He also wants HR to makediversity mainstream by selling it to their boards as a way of increasingprofits. Phillips believes HR directors must run with the ball – selling diversity totheir firms as a business benefit, and not simply as a way to tackle a socialproblem. He feels that HR directors currently believe diversity is ‘dumped’ onthem, and the only way they will get support from other areas of the firm is topromote it as a business necessity. “HR directors aren’t Martin Luther King, they are hired to make theirorganisations work. We need to move out of the missionary position to one wherepeople think about the business,” Phillips said. “Some HR directors have taken a different approach and are aggressivein treating diversity as a business problem and not a social one. Wherecompanies state they are doing it [diversity] to hit targets so everyone has ajob next year, people will join in.” Phillips believes this is the only approach that will make business leaderscommit to mainstreaming diversity in firms. “The chief executive is brimming with racial niceness and says to theHR director, ‘Make us an inter-racial paradise’. And the poor HR director hasto report back to the chairman, and if they have not made it wonderful, thenthey have failed,” Phillips said. “A lot of HR directors feel ratherdumped on.” Phillips believes the private sector is “afraid of the CRE”, andadmits it doesn’t work closely enough with private companies. However, hewarns, he will not shy away from instigating formal investigations if they donot change their attitudes. He told Personnel Today that all private sector firms delivering publicservices must comply with the Race Relations Amendment Act (RRAA), which forcespublic bodies to actively promote racial equality. Employers must also publishannual reports charting progress and action plans in this area. He said the Government’s policy of encouraging private organisations to fundthe modern-isation of the public sector has led to an ever increasing number ofprivate firms delivering public services, creating a grey area in the law. “Even if the law [RRAA] does not specifically cover private sectorcompanies, we think it essentially captures private sector companies that workfor the public sector. I am going to operate as if it does,” Phillipssaid. “Why should public money be spent in a way that is racially biased? Icannot accept that. Everyone involved in a public-private partnership and acontract that provides services to the public sector – both morally and legally– will have to observe the public duty.” He admits the CRE must change its ways if a new, closer working relationshipis to be successful. “They [the private sector] are asking us how they cando it [improve racial diversity in the work-place] and that is the challenge wehave not quite risen to yet.” Phillips backs recommendations in a recent Government report, which calledon the CRE to ‘name and shame’ racist employers by making greater use of itsinvestigatory powers to put the spotlight on firms with bad equality practices– although he said he will give employers every opportunity to improve beforeusing the full force of the law that he has at his disposal. “There will be a considerable effort in tackling the image the privatesector has of us as a ‘heavy handed copper’,” he said. “I wouldrather the CRE is viewed as a friendly GP, who will give all the medicine andadvice to help an organisation to get healthy. But if a firm is going to disobey,then we will administer the nasty medicine or have it put into hospital. I ampretty straight with people, we will instigate formal investigations.” He also backs the Government’s move to merge the six equalities bodies(SEB), which include the CRE, the equal opportunities commission, thedisability rights commission and the Employers Forum on Age. He believes itwill give them more respect and influence over mainstream diversity issues. Phillips feels that because the individual specialist bodies look afterdifferent equalities areas, they are “marginalised”, viewed as an”add on” and done as “a favour”. He cites the instance ofone body overseeing the case of a black woman working in the City earning lessthan her white male colleagues as an example of how the new system can work inpractice. He wants the merged body to share core functions, including communication,management, estate and property. But he wants to ensure that existing expertisein specialist areas remain. Phillips is also promising to radically overhaul the racial diversity of hisown senior team by introducing more white commissions, as he fears the CRE isregarded as a place where “black people get together to whinge.” www.cre.gov.ukTrevor Phillips’ CV– 2003 – Chair, CRE – 2002 – Deputy chairman, GLA– 2001 – Chairman, GLA– 2000 – Member of the Greater London Authority– 1993 – Deputy general secretary, TUC– 1981 – Television journalist/producer (including head ofLWT’s current affairs 1992-1994)– 1980 Researcher, London Weekend Television Racial diversity is a business problemOn 29 Apr 2003 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Transborders Energy signs MOU for collaboration with Osaka Gas

first_img Image: Transborders Energy signs Memorandum of Understanding for Collaboration) with Osaka Gas. Photo: courtesy of rawpixel from Pixabay. Transborders Energy Pty Ltd (Transborders) is pleased to advise that it has signed a Memorandum of Understanding for Collaboration (MoU) with Osaka Gas Co., Ltd (Osaka Gas).This MOU will facilitate information and knowledge sharing for both companies to evaluate projects that could commercialise stranded offshore gas resources based on Transborders’ FLNG Solution.Transborders’ FLNG Solution provides a pre-engineered one point three (1.3) million tonne per annum floating LNG facility with a package of streamlined commercial arrangements and a robust regulatory approval execution plan to gas resource owners.Transborders’ Chairman Jack Sato says, “Osaka Gas’s capabilities in the LNG business are world class. We look forward to seeking insights and support from Osaka Gas to strengthen the development of our venture.”Transborders is currently conducting Pre-FEED work and pre-negotiation of key commercial terms for its FLNG Solution. By the end of 2019, Transborders will be in a position to convert a range of stranded gas resources into ‘project sanction (FID) ready’ state within 24 months after the FLNG Solution deployment, while also allowing LNG buyers access to competitive LNG supply sources.Transborders will deploy its FLNG Solution with its strategic partners Kyushu Electric Power, other world class LNG buyers, TechnipFMC and Add Energy.Transborders’ FLNG Solution development work is also designated as a “Major Project” from the Australian Federal Government. Source: Company Press Release The MOU will facilitate information and knowledge sharing for both companies to evaluate projectslast_img read more

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Varsity Triumph for Men’s Blues

first_imgMen’s Blues 113:99 Women’s Blues 90:100 Men’s Seconds 96:114 Women’s Seconds 69:119 The many spectators that braved the variable weather conditions to watch the 129th Varsity Athletics Match witnessed a day of intense, passion fuelled competition as the Men’s Blues extended their sequence of victories to 6 and the Women’s Blues narrowly failed to repeat last year’s victory. Although both Oxford 2nd teams lost, the performances were gutsy and the pride of representing Oxford in this historic occasion shone through. Many stalwarts of OUAC closed the chapters on their Varsity careers with exceptional performances. Jenny Duff repeated her triple victory of 2002 in the hammer, shot put and discus and was deservedly awarded the Susan Dennler trophy for best female performance. Oxford indeed dominated the heavy throws with C. Kapande placing 2nd in both the hammer and discus and O. Reade 2nd in the shot. Chris Sleeman won the 400m hurdles by 0.1s in 52.8s, overhauling his nemesis, S. Green, with a determined surge off the last hurdle. He also easily won the 400m. Nick Talbot extended his unprecedented sequence of 3,000m steeplechase victories to 5 in his final appearance in dark blue. Women’s captain Helen Edmundson blitzed the opposition with a new personal best of 12.2s in the 100m and a 25.9s 200m victory, ably supported by S. Burns who placed 2nd in the 100m and 3rd in the 200m. Finlay Wright was cruelly denied victory in the 100m when his hamstring pulled with 7m remaining. Despite the immense pain he still finished 2nd in 10.9, the same time given to 1st place. Sam Watts, who has fought injury this year, ran exceptionally well in the 400m hurdles to take 2nd place in a blues standard time, behind a meeting record by K. Taylor of Cambridge. There were fine performances from OUAC’s Varsity Match debutants. Fraser Thompson was majestic and indestructible in the 1500 and 5,000, leading Oxford to 1-2s in both events with N. Talbot and J. Brooks securing the 2nd places. Steven McCauley’s roars echoed across the track as he launched the shot put and discus to secure 1st place in both events. Sean Gourley got the crowds urging him on as he leapt to long jump victory in an impressive 7.01m. He also won the pole vault in 4.20m. Kathryn Hesketh recovered from injury to achieve a 11.13m leap and Hannah Barnes soared to a meeting best performance of 2.20m in the pole vault. The performances of the veterans were no less impressive. Dave and Pete Harding could not quite manage a 1-2 in the javelin but Dave did finally secure his 1st victory with 53.11m. Sarah Lane was 20cm away from victory in the long jump. Helen Zenner and Emily Crowley performed well to take 2nd and 3rd in both the 800m and 1500m behind Cambridge’s class athlete E. Leggate. Highlights from the 2nd team matches included victories for L. Bromilow in the 800m, S. Lowery in the high jump, G.Davies in the 5,000 and 1-2s in the 110mh by O. Odudu and J. Crawshaw.ARCHIVE: 4th Week TT 2003last_img read more

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Workshop To Help Veterans With Criminal Records

first_imgWorkshop To Help Veterans With Criminal Recordsfor www.theindianalawyer.comIndiana Legal Services is conducting a workshop next week to help veterans with criminal records learn how to possibly expunge them.The workshop will be at 1 p.m. Thursday at Lincoln Apartments, 530 North Holmes Ave., Indianapolis and will tell veterans about what kind of criminal records can be expunged and how they can go about doing that. The ILS attorney will also take applications for legal assistance.The workshop will be led by Polli Pollem, the lead attorney in ILS’ Military Assistance Project. She served 22 years in the military and is VA-accredited.The workshop is also open to people who assist veterans such as social workers, county veterans’ service officers and other veteran advocates.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Indiana Conservation Officer Elected As Member Of National Safe Boating Organization

first_imgFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare Indiana Conservation Officer Lt. Kenton Turner has been elected to serve on the executive board of the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators (NASBLA).  During NASBLA’s 57th annual meeting, held on September 11-14, 2016 in Seattle, Washington, Lt. Turner was elected to serve the non-profit organization for the 2016-2017 calendar year.A native of Trafalgar, IN, Turner graduated in 1988 from Vincennes University with an Associate of Science Degree in Conservation Law Enforcement.  He began his career as a field officer with the DNR Law Enforcement Division in 1992.  He was named as the Indiana Boating Law Administrator in May 2013.  Turner graduated from the 265th session of the FBI National Academy at Quantico, VA September 2016.Turner has served as vice chair of NASBLA’s Preparedness and Response Committee 2013-2015 and as a member of the Enforcement and Training Committee 2015-2016.NASBLA is a national nonprofit organization that works to develop public policy for recreational safe boating safety.  NASBLA represents the recreational boating authorities of all 50 states and the U.S territories.  NASBLA offers a variety of resources, including training, model acts, education standards and publications.  Through a national network of thousands of professional educators, law enforcement officers and volunteers, the organization affects the lives of over 76 million American boaters.“Lt. Turner’s leadership on the national stage is another example of how Indiana Conservation Officers are recognized for being Indiana’s foremost water response agency”, said Danny L. East, DNR Law Enforcement Division Director.  “The training and expertise of our officers to patrol our state’s waterways is second to none, with this appointment we now have the opportunity to provide guidance to other state’s boating enforcement agencies.”-30-Media contact: Captain William T. Browne, DNR Division of Law Enforcement, 765-509-0207For full details, view this message on the web.last_img read more

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Ex-Ocean City High School Teacher Arrested on Sexual Assault Charges

first_imgCape May County Prosecutor Jeffrey H. Sutherland and Ocean City Police Chief Jay Prettyman on Monday announced the arrest of a former high school music teacher on sexual assault charges.Ricardo Valle, 34, who currently lives in Seabrook, Texas, was charged with two counts of sexual assault, one count of official misconduct, one count of endangering the welfare of a child, and one count of criminal sexual contact.The charges were a result of a joint investigation conducted by the Ocean City Police Department and the Cape May County Prosecutor’s Office Special Victims Unit, after it was reported that Valle allegedly sexually assaulted a student in 2016 while he was a teacher at the Ocean City High School.Minutes from the June 22, 2016, meeting of the Ocean City Board of Education show that Valle resigned from his position as a high school music teacher effective July 1, 2016. No reason for his resignation was given.Valle was arrested in Texas on Feb. 27 by members of the Seabrook Police Department and is currently being lodged at the Harris County jail pending extradition hearings.The investigation continues. The prosecutor urges anyone with additional information to contact the Cape May County Prosecutor’s Office at 609-465-1135, or the Ocean City Police Department at 609-525-9131, or report it anonymously through the Cape May County Sheriff’s Tip Line at cmcsheriff.net and click on anonymous tip, or through the Cape May County Crime Stoppers, 609-889-3597. The Ocean City Police Department was part of an investigation leading to the arrest of a former high school teacher for an alleged sex assault on a student. last_img read more

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Bloomberg extols ‘moral leadership’ at Business School

first_img Bloomberg program has worked with officials to help them govern more effectively, creatively Founded global information company, became three-term mayor of NYC Gore decries attacks on facts, science, reason Mayoral initiative heads for year two Relatedcenter_img Bloomberg named Commencement speaker In Class Day address, former vice president and climate defender criticizes ‘would-be autocrats’ Calling on the Harvard Business School Class of 2019 to demonstrate “moral leadership,” Class Day speaker Michael R. Bloomberg, M.B.A. ’66, invoked integrity in the service of country and capitalism.“Being ethical does not require a master’s degree,” he said. “It requires having a conscience and following it.”Addressing the crowd braving Wednesday’s afternoon chill on the lawn of Baker Library/Bloomberg Center, the former New York City mayor recalled his youth in Medford and his years at Harvard Business School (HBS) — or, as he expressed it, at the Hong Kong and the much-lamented Wursthaus.“I was always one of those who made the top half of the class possible,” joked the speaker, who also founded Bloomberg L.P. and Bloomberg Philanthropies and serves as the U.N. Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Climate Action and the World Health Organization’s Global Ambassador for Noncommunicable Diseases. His daughter, Emma, earned her M.B.A. from HBS in 2007.Bloomberg said it was as a 24-year-old in his first job after earning his M.B.A., at what was then Salomon Brothers & Hutzler, that he learned the importance of both ethics and philanthropy in capitalism. Under the tutelage of managing partner William Rogers “Billy” Salomon, he realized, “When it came to ethics, there was no compromising.”This principle reaches beyond business, Bloomberg stressed — particularly today, when people are questioning not only our economic system but the fundamentals of our government. “My luckiest break was taking a job out of College where I got to see the ethics I learned growing up put into practice in the workplace,” he said. “But when we look at today’s world, it’s not clear that everyone with a degree in business has those principles. And that’s one reason, I believe, that this great country of ours is suffering from an ethical crisis that is corroding our society.”Faced with rising income inequality and partisan politics, the public today sees “truth and science being trampled with reckless abandon” and the rule of law “attacked and undermined,” he said. The result is a lack of faith that can foster extremists on both the left and right, he warned.“More and more Americans — especially in your generation — are questioning whether capitalism is capable of creating a just society,” he said. “Their faith in America and all that we represent is being shaken. If we do not act to restore it, the turmoil in our politics today will be only a prelude of what’s to come, and that could shake the very foundations of our society.”,Part of the answer, he stressed, is regulation. Citing both Teddy Roosevelt’s breaking up of the monopolies and Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s New Deal, he said politics should mute the worst impulses of the business world in order to promote public good.“I’m as much a capitalist as you will ever find,” he said. “But anyone who believes that unfettered capitalism works hasn’t read history.”Beyond strengthening laws and regulations to keep the capitalism’s excesses in check, Bloomberg focused on personal responsibility.“Public faith in private markets rests on individual actions,” he said.Emphasizing fairness in the workforce, he detailed how valuing workers pays off in loyalty and retention, a good act that makes good sense. “Be honest with your colleagues, clients, and contractors,” he said. “Don’t ever try to take advantage of them. And don’t hesitate to speak up when someone else does.”He urged the graduates to align themselves with companies involved with philanthropy as they move into the business world. Citing his own firm, the speaker noted, “At Bloomberg, philanthropy gives us a competitive advantage in recruiting and retaining talent — and it’s as good for the bottom line as anything a company can do.”M.B.A. Class of 2019 Student Association Co-Presidents Triston Jay Francis (from left) and Sana Mohammed, join Class Day student speaker Brandon Rapp, M.B.A. ’19, and HBS Dean Nitin Nohria onstage during HBS Class Day. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerHowever, he added, philanthropy should not be only a corporate policy. “Give back on your own,” he said. “Don’t wait.”On the same note, Bloomberg announced that next year, with Bloomberg Philanthropies’ support, HBS will hold an alumni conference on investing in the age of climate change. He called it “another example of where doing right and doing good are aligned.”Finally, he called on the assembly to make their voices heard through the ballot box. “Elect people who understand that it’s their obligation to make capitalism work for everyone,” he said. “That means picking up where Teddy and Franklin Roosevelt left off and modernizing capitalism for our time.“America must always be a place where it’s possible to get rich through perspiration and innovation,” he concluded. “But it must never be a place where the middle class steadily loses ground — and where many of those feel trapped at the bottom.”last_img read more

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Get an Extended Sneak Peek at the Into the Woods Film, Including Singing!

first_imgTake a break from staring at those breathtaking Into the Woods photos and feast your eyes on this. We now have an extended sneak peek at the film, including singing. YES, SINGING! Check out the featurette below to get a taste of snippets from the prologue, Meryl Streep’s “Stay With Me” and more! Also look out for James Lapine, Stephen Sondheim and Rob Marshall gushing about the cast, and the cast gushing about Lapine, Sondheim and Marshall. There’s a lot of love. We wish, more than anything, more than the moon, for it to be Christmas already! View Commentslast_img

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Future fuel

first_imgBy K.C. DasUniversity of Georgia Targeted GHG reductions can unintentionally eliminate some promising technologies that are lagging behind because of late starts, such as algae-based biofuels. Anaerobic digestion, a well-developed technology, is not considered because the energy output (methane gas) isn’t a liquid transportation fuel at room temperature. A similar process called landfill bioreactor produces methane biogas which can be converted to compressed natural gas. Its GHG emissions are 17 percent less than its fossil-based equivalent. Anaerobic digestion can create jobs and produce net income to farms and small biofuels producers. UGA researchers are developing a system that combines anaerobic digestion with algae production. Current regulatory policies don’t readily support developing such integrated solutions in early development. More pilot-scale testing could help move them to the marketplace faster. Federal agencies seem focused on large-scale demonstrations before pilot-scale research is completed.Welcomed policy changeCarbon sequestration is a welcomed change in national policy. Current regulatory emphasis favors carbon capture and storage through geological storage of compressed CO2. Although potentially a reliable technique, this approach favors larger-scale sequestration.One example of a smaller-scale method is using biochar, a byproduct of pyrolysis, a high-temperature breakdown of cellulosic materials that produces a liquid hydrocarbon, which could be converted to green diesel or other liquid fuels. Biochar has high carbon content and stays in the soil for decades, increasing agricultural productivity and sequestering carbon for a long time. However, the regulatory framework doesn’t favor developing this technology.There is great promise for biofuels to augment our energy supply. New ideas, technologies and discoveries are emerging from universities and research centers daily. Development and use of these discoveries could be faster if regulatory framework would support deeper exploration into novel crops that don’t pit fuel against food. Encourage innovationWe need policies to encourage processes and technologies that create jobs and income for farms and small businesses. We need support that allows us to investigate diverse feedstocks and low-cost, efficient production methods that protect and enhance the environment. If we are to reach 36 billion gallons of biofuels in our transportation fuel mix by 2022 while reducing GHG emissions, all avenues of exploration must be open and barriers to development removed. (K.C. Das is director of the Biorefining and Carbon Cycling Program with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and Faculty of Engineering. This editorial was presented as testimony before the U.S. House Committee on Small Business’ subcommittee on regulations and healthcare.) The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 charges the U.S. to add 36 billion gallons of biofuels to the country’s transportation fuel mix by 2022. Continued investment in research, development and deployment are required to achieve this goal.Recent scientific studies warn that increasing land use for producing biomass for biofuels would increase greenhouse gas, or GHG, emissions compared to gasoline. Some may disagree with these studies. However, they do show the weakness in expanding a crop-based fuel system without planning for sustainability.If we continue to try to produce more biomass from the current spectrum of crop choices, GHG emission restrictions could put small biofuel producers and family farms at a disadvantage. Reduced emissions require crops that are easier to grow; require less money to plant, harvest and water; and are easier to process. Needed production improvementsCorn ethanol production in the U.S. consumes a quarter of the country’s corn crop. Increasing ethanol production to the targeted 15 billion gallons a year by 2022 will double the corn required. That increase will impact land and water needs and create environmental concerns. We need to improve the productivity of corn and other biofuels crops and incorporate improvements into the production process. Producing lignocellulosic ethanol or other advanced biofuels, or green diesel, is a challenge. Technology development in this field has advanced, but most U.S. facilities are still in the early-demonstration phase. Using existing forestry and agriculture residues for biofuels would have minimal environmental impact while creating opportunity for small businesses and farms.Forestry and agriculture generate significant biomass. According to the Department of Energy and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, forestlands can produce 368 million dry tons of biomass annually. Current legislative definitions make renewable forest biomass off-limits to biofuels companies. Definitions must be changed, while maintaining the resources’ sustainability.Data from the UGA Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources suggests collecting residues and producing chips for biofuel production costs $11 to $12 per ton delivered to mills. Food v. fuelIt’s crucial that we have a diverse source of biomass that doesn’t compete with food supplies. Diversity allows different geographical regions to focus on crops best suited to local conditions. Current federal funding often favors specific feedstocks, hampering development and transfer technology for novel crops. Many novel crops are being explored. For example, a recent UGA study looked at using a multi-benefit winter cover crop, oil seed radish, for its biofuels potential. UGA scientists led a global team in sequencing the sorghum genome and are now working toward understanding how we can use the information to produce biofuels at lower costs in poor soils. Targets eliminate possibilitieslast_img read more

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SUV Crashes Into Great Neck Store, Killing Woman

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 66-year-old woman was killed when an SUV crashed into the Great Neck cell phone store she was in on Monday morning.Nassau County police said a woman was driving a Toyota Rav 4 when she crashed into the AT&T store on Northern Boulevard at 10:51 a.m.The victim, Lizabeth Sbar of Great Neck, was taken to North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, where she was pronounced dead two hours later.Two other people suffered non-life threatening injuries in the crash. The driver and her passenger were not injured.Detectives are continuing the investigation.last_img

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