South Korea launches ninth Type 214 submarine Shin Dol-Seok

first_img View post tag: Shin Dol-seok South Korea launches ninth Type 214 submarine Shin Dol-Seok Share this article September 7, 2017 The Republic of Korea Navy launched its ninth Son Won-Il-class (Type 214) submarine in a ceremony at the Hyundai Heavy Industries shipyard in Ulsan, on September 7.The submarine was named after ‘Shin Dol-Seok’, a Korean general of the Righteous Armies who fought against the Japanese army in the early 20th century.Shin Dol-Seok is the final of the second batch of Type 214 submarines and is expected to become operational in 2019 after it completes outfitting and sea trials.Hyundai Heavy Industries has built South Korea’s first three 214 submarines and subsequent fifth, seventh and ninth submarines of the same class. The other boats were constructed by Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering.Type 214 submarines are South Korea’s first air-independent propulsion submarines, measure 65 m in length and can sail at a maximum speed of 20 knots with a crew of 40.With a 1,800-ton displacement capacity, the submarines can dive up to 400 m deep and stay submerged for two weeks. The submarine, equipped with guided missiles, torpedoes and mines, also features an automatic simultaneous target tracking system and a torpedo guidance and detection system. Back to overview,Home naval-today South Korea launches ninth Type 214 submarine Shin Dol-Seok View post tag: ROK Navycenter_img View post tag: ROK submarine View post tag: Type 214 View post tag: KSS-II View post tag: HHI Authoritieslast_img read more

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“READERS FORUM” AUGUST 9, 2018

first_imgWe hope that today’s “Readers Forum” will provoke honest and open dialogue concerning issues that we, as responsible citizens of this community, need to address in a rational and responsible way? WHATS ON YOUR MIND TODAY?Todays“Readers Poll” question is: Do you feel that the IU Medical school will have a major economic impact on downtown Evansville?Please take time and read our articles entitled “STATEHOUSE Files, CHANNEL 44 NEWS, LAW ENFORCEMENT, READERS POLL, BIRTHDAYS, HOT JOBS” and “LOCAL SPORTS”.  You now are able to subscribe to get the CCO daily.If you would like to advertise on the CCO please contact us [email protected]: City-County Observer Comment Policy.  Be kind to people. No personal attacks or harassment will not be tolerated and shall be removed from our site.We understand that sometimes people don’t always agree and discussions may become a little heated.  The use of offensive language, insults against commenters will not be tolerated and will be removed from our siteFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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County worker files lawsuit against Hoboken McDonald’s, alleging discrimination

first_imgHOBOKEN — According to news reports, Hoboken resident Quan Dunlap, 47, has filed a lawsuit against McDonald’s alleging the Hoboken staff discriminated against him because he was African American. Dunlap said he had stopped at the McDonald’s on Third and Washington streets after getting off work at the county’s Department of Public Works. He said that he was allegedly told he would only be served if he didn’t stay to eat at the restaurant.After getting his food, he told the worker he wanted to speak to a supervisor he said he was told he could only stay to eat for 20 minutes because they were “getting complaints from regular customers about people like me,” according to the lawsuit.The suit, filed in Hudson County Superior Court by Dunlap’s attorney, Louis Zayas, seeks a jury trial, punitive and compensatory damages, attorney fees and other relief as deemed by the court.Hoboken McDonald’s did not answer three calls for comment on Wednesday.last_img read more

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Kids’ Kindness Leads to Gift From OC Councilman Hartzell

first_imgChildren at Ralph Atwood Primary School in Maine display their “Kindness Motivation Mirrors,” crafts to remind kids on the importance of politeness and kindness toward others. The school has made a strong effort for students to be consistently polite and kind, which prompted Councilman Keith Hartzell to make a commitment to help the school. (Photo courtesty Atwood Primary School) By Tim KellySomehow, it all seemed like it was meant to be.Ocean City Councilman Keith Hartzell wasn’t supposed to be at the Ralph M. Atwood Primary School in Oakland, Maine last month, but there he was.The Atwood students weren’t expecting a visitor to be touched by their extraordinary acts of kindness, but he was.The school’s principal, Jenny McGee, wasn’t seeking feedback on the school’s efforts to instill in their students the importance of good manners and acts of kindness toward others.Certainly Hartzell never planned on flashing back to a memory of his late mother June sharing a similar message – from when Keith was about the same age of some of the Atwood students. However, that’s exactly what occurred.What happened next was the start of something extraordinary.“I’ve been going into schools for 38 years and this was the first time I ever spoke to a principal regarding the students,” said Hartzell, an Ocean City At Large member of City Council, whose fulltime job is Regional Manager of von Drehle Corporation, a paper towel, tissue and dispenser manufacturer. “It was also the first time school children made such a deep impression on me.”Inspired by the kids’ politeness, Hartzell decided to pay the good feelings forward. He will make a donation of $1,000 to the school every year until each of the current students complete high school.“Giving a donation to the school wasn’t so much about the money but rather to recognize the children’s efforts,” Hartzell said.“All over the school, kids were asking me how I was doing, how I was feeling. They wanted to know where I was from.  I was speaking to a little girl in the nurse’s office who was obviously very sick.  All she wanted to ask me was how was I doing. I was extremely touched.”Ocean City at Large Councilman Keith Hartzell received an individual thank-you card from each of the more than 200 students of the Atwood Primary School in Maine, in response to his pledge to make ongoing donations to the school until all current students graduate from high school.Ocean City Councilman Keith Hartzell was touched by his encounters with the students of Atwell Primary School.The encounters prompted Keith to seek out McGee.“I’m always a bit nervous (when someone asks if I’m the principal),” McGee said, “never knowing what I’m about to hear.”What she heard was the Ocean City Councilman’s impression of the youngsters who “are so very caring and polite and nice, despite how young they happen to be (most Atwell students are between four and seven).”This was music to McGee’s ears, for the school consistently teaches its students of the importance of politeness, kindness and good manners.“She was so appreciative. It made me want to do something,” said Hartzell.Hartzell remembered his own childhood and a lesson his mother, who passed away in October 2017, taught him: that politeness was so important, it was worth being compensated for.“That always stuck with me that my mother (placed monetary value) on being polite.”Hartzell informed McGee that he wanted to make a donation to the school, which has a current enrollment of 235 students in pre-kindergarten through second grade.The students are from diverse backgounds and live in an economically-challended region. Oakland is located about 20 miles north of Maine’s state capital, Augusta.“Everywhere I went, the students were interested in me and were extremely polite,” Hartzell said. “It was really very impressive. I couldn’t get over how caring they were of others at such a young age.”Under normal circumstances, his encounters with the Atwood students never would have happened at all. On the road, Hartzell said, his work mission is usually sales-related. However, if installers of the towels and toilet paper dispensers are busy, Hartzell isn’t above helping out.On this particular day, the local product distributor took Keith up on the offer, and he found himself hanging dispensers inside Atwood, and interacting with scores of polite, kind and helpful youngsters.“It felt like something bigger was at work here,” he said. “I never should have even been there. It was like there was a higher purpose.”Atwood Primary School Principal Jenny McGee, shown here with students and faculty members, was named Principal of the Year in 2017 by the Maine Principals Association. She made a connection with Ocean City Councilman Keith Hartzell during a recent visit. (Photo courtesty Atwell Primary School)Later, Hartzell’s encounter with McGee was the subject of a letter to parents on the school website.“You are doing a great job raising polite children who want to do the right thing,” the Principal wrote. “Manners are core skills that will serve your children well their whole lives…that will serve them well every place they go. People notice.”After Hartzell informed the principal of his intentions to make the yearly donations, McGee called an assembly of the school to reinforce the lesson.Then, last Friday, a large envelope arrived at City Hall addressed to Hartzell. Inside were individual thank you notes from every child in the school.“I couldn’t believe it, the letters were so great,” he said. “Some included pictures of themselves.  Some were very creative.  I was tearing up reading them.”Hartzel said he feels “like I will be connected with these kids for the rest of my life,” he remarked. “I want to stay in touch with the school and the kids.  I want to see about other ways I can help them.”An ultimate dream he said, would be “to put some kind of a field trip together for the children to come and visit Ocean City.”In the meantime, he’s making legal arrangements for the donation and would change his will to include the donation, if he’s not around to see the Atwood students graduate high school.He would also like to see Atwood’s standard for good manners and politeness applied to other schools.“It’s something that should have a significant emphasis in our schools.”Those wishing to join the Councilman’s efforts may send donations to: McGee at Atwood Primary School, 19 Heath St., Oakland, ME 04963last_img read more

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Tunnel vision

first_imgWhat can the optimum travelling oven achieve? Fast efficient baking well, that should be a given. But nowadays, every semi and industrial user is looking for more. At the Iba exhibition in Germany, Gouet, a part of Mecatherm, launched its new Double Action oven. Gouet chairman Olivier Sergent took British Baker through its workings: “The Double Action oven combines two of the most sought-after baking systems: cyclotherm and impingement, also known as radiation baking and forced convection baking.” Radiation baking means there is no air movement, so the products bake gently and evenly. “In convection baking, when the core temperature is correct, the top opens and hot air flow gives fast surface baking for exactly the right amount of colour.”Its dual action makes the oven ideal for tin breads, he says, ensuring they have no burnt tops, but is also suitable for flat breads, rolls and topped lines, such as pizzas. Sergent adds: “There is fantastic flexibility, but also consistency. And what makes it unique is that you can bake such a range of goods on an industrial scale in one oven. Baking time is reduced, saving energy, while the quality of the product, including tin bread, is excellent.”The first oven has already been sold to the Village Bakery (Coedpoeth) for its gluten-free production site at Wrexham.Italian manufacturer Polin’s tunnel ovens are designed for larger-scale bread, pastry and biscuit production. Polin manufactured its first oven some 80 years ago in Verona, Italy. The company now makes ovens capable of multiple applications. From cyclothermic heated systems to convection and electric, the made-to-order range can be adapted to suit a particular product and the production levels required.With the benefits of combining multihead depositors and sheeters to the line, as well as a choice of conveyor, from wire mesh, metal or stone-based, production can become more streamlined and versatile.Travelling cookerDouble D, now a division of JBT FoodTech, installed its first Revoband Continuous Oven over 16 years ago, using technology based on the company’s travelling cooker for the meat and poultry industry. Designed in zones, for extreme flexibility, the high impingement oven can be programmed to suit any number of different bakery recipes and specifications, while the travelling stainless steel band can be custom-built up to 3.6 metres wide.The production of chilled or pre-cooked speciality breads is an expanding market, one in which New Primebake, part of the Bakkavör Group and one of Double D’s customers, specialises. Three factories in Nantwich, Barton and, most recently, Crewe, produce speciality breads for most of the major UK supermarkets, including a range of handcrafted breads with toppings, comprising butter, garlic, cheese, olives, herbs and sun-dried tomatoes.With the addition of the Crewe factory, Mark Jones, New Primebake’s manufacturing director, was charged with the task of doubling capacity without changing the technical specifications of the bake and, importantly, maintaining safety, as toppings like butter and cheese can be extremely volatile. He says: “We initially wrote a spec for 10 oven manufacturers from across the world and shortlisted five. Double D ticked all our boxes. Their knowledge straddles both baking and food industries, allowing our initial specification and design to benefit from a diverse product knowledge, imparting significant benefits that we would not have thought possible in traditional baking principles.”The oven also boasts Double D’s Clean In Place (CIP) system, featuring sparge pipes that deliver a pressurised, heated, caustic solution throughout the oven, cleaning any debris or residue. “The Double D oven also contains a water bath, which collects and discards this volatile residue. It has halved our cleaning down-time,” says Jones.Energy-saving featuresSpooner Industries of Ilkley has over 75 years’ experience in bakery, developing new technologies in its in-house testing and R&D facilities. The company’s tunnel ovens are designed with an energy efficiency mode installed. During product change-over, the oven temperature and airflow can be automatically lowered, while remaining ready to bake with minimal energy usage. Spooner has also integrated energy-saving features to automatically minimise the combustion air quantity and can install easy-clean heat recovery systems to capture the flue stack energy and use it to preheat fresh air or for bakery hot water heating.Adjustable air systems allow Spooner’s tunnel oven to alter its baking characteristics, providing the ability to adjust heat flux at numerous points throughout the baking process. The company uses various methods of retraction for ease of access, including traditional hinge doors, retracting doors and a complete retracting top half. Specific attention is paid to hygiene throughout the detail, design and also in the manufacturing techniques used in the oven construction.Forced convection systems provide uniform airflow, which results in even and consistent bake quality, says the company, while the installation of radiant effect damper systems offers versatility in the type of bake between either convection or radiant type baking to give the product the desired quality and appearance.Spooner Industries recently secured a fourth order from Warburtons to design and manufacture a tunnel oven for its new ’super-bakery’ in Bristol. Warburtons chairman Jonathan Warburton says: “The new Bristol Bakery is one of our biggest developments. We’ve invested heavily in the latest state-of-the-art equipment from companies we know and trust.” Spooner Vicars, a separate company, also supplies tunnel ovens.Benier UK supplies ovens to suit every type of bakery and works with four main manufacturers three within the Kaak Group, and Sveba Dahlen, a specialist semi-industrial oven supplier in Sweden. Within Kaak are: German-based Daub, which pioneered the use of thermal oil ovens, saving customers up to 30% on their energy costs while producing a quality end product; and Italian firm MCS, a specia-list manufacturer of pizza ovens and industrial cyclotherm ovens. Its products are also suitable for almost any kind of baked goods, from traditional bread (hearth-baked) to all types of panned bread, rolls and the more delicate products. MCS ovens can reach a baking temperature of up to 350°C. Also, in the Kaak Group itself is the Multi-Step oven which travels vertically rather than horizontally.The Daub Hanseat range is a multi-deck tunnel oven system that can either be batch or continuous. Its special system means heat cannot escape when products are being loaded and the oven is aimed at large bakeries that require a continuous throughput. David Marsh, managing director of Benier UK, says: “Daub’s ovens use thermal oil to heat a radiator, which runs through the oven and maintains it at the optimum temperature throughout its entire length, a bit like a domestic central heating system that maintains the same heat throughout a property.”The MCS Bakemaster tunnel oven can be supplied with either a wire mesh or a stone plate baking conveyor. The wire mesh oven is suitable for hearth-baked products as well as baking on trays or in tins, pans and moulds. Similarly, one or more turbo zones can be incorporated to optimise heat transfer. Its modular design also allows each Bakemaster oven to be easily adapted to bake a wide range of products, such as rolls hearth-baked and in pans or trays; bread hearth-baked and/or in tins; cakes; confectionery; and pizza. The MCS direct-fired HT Oven is used for baking products that require high temperatures, often more than 350°C, such as pizzas, pitta bread and other similar products. The Kaak Multi-Step vertical tunnel oven has an indexing chain at the entrance, which lifts the baking trays stepwise towards the top of the oven. The trays are then pushed into the second baking chamber, where a similar stepping mechanism will bring them down. This process is repeated, after which the trays will leave the oven.last_img read more

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More superintendents wanting to cancel standardized tests this year

first_img Google+ Pinterest Previous articleMetro Homicide and SBPD investigating after a child was unresponsiveNext articleIHSAA Chief: There will be spring sports this year Network Indiana Facebook Twitter Pinterest WhatsApp Twitter (Photo supplied/Indiana Department of Education) Nearly 40 northeast Indiana school superintendents want changes to this year’s standardized tests.In a letter sent to Indiana Secretary of Education Dr. Katie Jenner and Governor Eric Holcomb, the superintendents say ILEARN testing is a health and safety risk for students and staff.The superintendents also agreed with a letter sent by 9 Marion County superintendents, who said that schools could use this time to catch up on the instruction they’ve missed out.The superintendents want the state to at least reconsider the requirements of the ILEARN test, to accommodate in-person students and families who do not want to send their students to school. More superintendents wanting to cancel standardized tests this year WhatsApp Google+ By Network Indiana – March 4, 2021 0 140 IndianaLocalNews Facebooklast_img read more

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News story: Victoria and Albert Museum appointment

first_imgKavita PuriKavita Puri is an award-winning journalist and radio broadcaster. In her landmark three-part series Partition Voices for BBC Radio 4, she documented the untold stories of Colonial British and British Asians who lived through the Partition of India 70 years ago, and assessed its legacy in Britain today. The programmes won the Royal Historical Society’s Radio and Podcast Award and its overall Public History Prize. The testimonies are being archived by the British Library Sound Archive. Her book based on the BBC series is due out in 2019. Her two critically-acclaimed Radio 4 series, Three Pounds in My Pocket, charted the migration of South Asians to post-war Britain, and she writes and lectures on these subjects.Kavita works for BBC Current Affairs as the editor of Our World, a foreign affairs documentary programme. Recent awards for its coverage include the Royal Television Society and the Foreign Press Association and she was named Journalist of the Year by the Asian Media Awards. Prior to this, Kavita worked at Newsnight as a political producer, film producer and assistant editor. She studied Law at Cambridge University.The role is not remunerated. This appointment has been made in accordance with the Cabinet Office’s Governance Code on Public Appointments. The appointments process is regulated by the Commissioner for Public Appointments. Under the Code, any significant political activity undertaken by an appointee in the last five years must be declared. This is defined as including holding office, public speaking, making a recordable donation, or candidature for election. Kavita has declared no such political activity.last_img read more

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Phil Lesh & Terrapin Family Band, Midnight North, & Twiddle Team For 3-Day “Unbroken Train” Run

first_imgToday, Phil Lesh-owned San Rafael, CA venue Terrapin Crossroads announced that it’ll be hosting a three-night run dubbed “Unbroken Train.” Unbroken Train will see performances by Phil Lesh & The Terrapin Family Band, Midnight North, and Twiddle over the three-night event spanning June 14th through 16th, with the groups’ members also collaborating in different forms.On Thursday, June 14th, Unbroken Train will kick off with a solo performance from Mihali, the frontman and guitarist of Twiddle, in the Grate Room. The next night, on Friday, June 15th, Midnight North—featuring Grahame Lesh, Elliott Peck, Alex Jordan, and Connor O’Sullivan—will be the main attraction at the Grate Room for a show billed as “Midnight North & Frends.” It’s more than likely this show will see an appearance by some, if not all, the members of Twiddle, given that the rogue spelling of “frends” has become associated with the Vermont group—the spelling comes from Twiddle’s lyrics, “There ain’t no I in Frends,” in their song, “The Frends Theme”. Rounding out the event, on Saturday, June 16th, Phil Lesh & The Terrapin Family Band will headline Terrapin Crossroads’ outdoor Beach Park with support from all four members of Twiddle and more.The collaborations set for Unbroken Train are by no means out of left field. Twiddle, Midnight North, and Phil Lesh & The Terrapin Family Band have an ongoing history of exchanging sit-ins with one another spanning back to the 2017 edition of Twiddle’s own Tumble Down festival, when Twiddle invited the Grateful Dead bassist and his son and guitarist, Grahame Lesh, to sit-in during their set.Earlier in May, Twiddle made their headlining debut at Red Rocks Amphitheater, and during the show, Phil and Grahame came out for a rendition of “Shakedown Street”. The next night, on May 5th, when Phil Lesh & The Terrapin Family Band and Leftover Salmon performed at Red Rocks, Mihali helped Phil Lesh & The Terrapin Family Band close out the show during their encore performances of “Fire On The Mountain” and “Music Never Stopped”. Closing out the weekend run, on Sunday, May 6th, Mihali performed an intimate “Mihali & Frends” set at Denver’s Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, which saw sit-ins from Phil and Grahame Lesh and Midnight North’s Elliott Peck and Alex Jordan, in addition to members of Twiddle, Thievery Corporation, Dopapod, Stick Figure, and Turbo Suit.Tickets for the upcoming Unbroken Train run at Terrapin Crossroads from June 14th to 16th are on-sale now. You can snag tickets, including a three-night package, at Terrapin Crossroads’ website here.last_img read more

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Change in the air at HSPH

first_imgThis is one of a series of occasional stories on the measures that Schools at Harvard are taking to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.While testing a new air-monitoring system in a laboratory at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH), Daniel O. Beaudoin intentionally spilled a small amount of acetone on the floor. The system detected the substance, increased airflow to the space, and cleared the air in just 36 minutes. The acetone melted the wax right off the floor tiles, a small price to pay for improved safety — and sustainability.In 2008, Harvard President Drew Faust announced the University’s goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 30 percent from 2006 levels by 2016 (including growth). To date, HSPH has cut its emissions by 19 percent, and the School’s investments in energy efficiency have resulted in savings of more than $1.3 million per year since 2006.Systems installed in laboratories have contributed significantly to the School’s energy savings. (Many are from Aircuity, a Newton, Mass., sustainable design company.) Labs require a constant supply of fresh air that must be cleaned, heated or cooled, and humidified. After this intensive process, none of the treated air can be recirculated.Each Aircuity system at HSPH reduces energy consumption by adjusting the number of air changes per hour in a lab based on actual conditions in the space.“The Aircuity system pulls columns of air from a lab through a vacuum pump to a centralized station with a series of sensors,” said Beaudoin, manager of operations, energy, and utilities at HSPH. “The sensors in the central station monitor temperature, humidity, small particulate matter, large particulate matter, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and total volatile organic compounds. Based on real-time readings, the system will adjust the ventilation rates in the lab.”When no research is being conducted, it is unnecessary to run air changes at a high rate, so the system decreases airflow. Conversely, when sensors detect a chemical spill, the system ramps up to the maximum number of air changes per hour to flush out the space. With the exception of biosafety level 3 labs (where researchers deal with lethal bacteria and viruses), all labs in the François-Xavier Bagnoud Building have been outfitted with Aircuity systems over the past two years.Other HSPH buildings benefit as well.LED lighting and motion sensors installed throughout HSPH have also resulted in significant electricity savings. In the Kresge Building, high-efficiency LED lights replaced incandescent and fluorescent fixtures in all the offices renovated last summer. On the ninth floor of the building alone, the total number of watts expended per square foot was cut by more than 50 percent.A 43,000-square-foot former schoolhouse at 90 Smith St., renovated to house HSPH administrative offices, is 100 percent LED-lit. Completed in February, the building was designed in compliance with the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) commercial interior guidelines. HSPH also has worked with local utilities to maximize energy efficiency, and learned from the New Buildings Institute’s “core performance guide.” Based on energy modeling, an “advanced building” may perform as much as 45 percent better than code.Beaudoin and other operations personnel often collaborate with student and staff groups on campus. The Environmental Health and Sustainability Club at HSPH, started in 2007, has hosted park cleanups, designed water bottles for first-year students, and organized volunteer events with the Food Project, a Massachusetts urban farming program.“Right now we’re working to create a speaker series about the effect of climate change on health,” said HSPH doctoral student Peter James, one of the club’s founding members and its current president. “For example, changing temperature distributions may lead to increased infectious disease transmission. It’s an emerging area of research.”An HSPH sustainability group, eco-opportunity, holds monthly meetings to discuss sustainability initiatives.“It’s one of the premier models for Green Teams campuswide, as far as having representation from each department in the School and implementing things as a team,” said Longwood sustainability manager Claire Berezowitz, who heads eco-opportunity along with Tiffany Colt, assistant facilities manager at HSPH. “The composting program that started a couple years ago was largely the result of work done by eco-opportunity.”Sebastian’s Café, the HSPH cafeteria, has full composting and recycling and no longer sells bottled water. Led by general manager Laurie Torf, the café was the first Harvard food service facility to earn a Green Restaurant Certification from the Green Restaurant Association of America.This month, eco-opportunity is holding its third “Take the Stairs” competition to encourage walking instead of using the elevator. An online tracking system helps participants follow their progress. In the 2010 competition, students, faculty, and staff collectively climbed 44,396 flights of stairs.“We did Mount Kilimanjaro the first year and Mount McKinley last year,” said Berezowitz. “It’s really gotten the word out about eco-opportunity, and it’s something to engage everyone at the School in sustainability.”last_img read more

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