Succession planning: Mind the gap

first_img Comments are closed. Businesses of all sizes are now under pressure to have succession plans in place. But how can you ensure you are prepared to fill a space? Virginia Matthews investigates.Last month’s resignation of Liberal Democrat leader Charles Kennedy – and the subsequent succession race – caused a frenzy that would be rare in the business world. Yet succession planning is climbing up the business agenda as thousands of organisations get to grips with a downsized workforce that leaves no room for unexpected absence, let alone sudden departures like Kennedy’s.Legal compliance, increased corporate governance and more volatile markets have also forced organisations to place more emphasis on succession. But it’s not just a case of who will fill the shoes of a departing chief executive. Organisations also need to consider issues as diverse as what happens when an office manager takes extended leave when their mother falls ill, or the deputy head of a department unexpectedly does a Shirley Valentine after a fortnight’s holiday in Greece.Levels of succession planning depend entirely on the culture of the organisation behind it. At retailing giant Tesco, it encompasses not just senior board executives, but also junior managers; whereas at soft drinks firm Britvic, succession planning is seen as a tool for handling only the very top positions.Susie Gear, a partner at consulting firm Accenture, says that succession planning is a hot issue both internally and for its clients.“Aside from the general job mobility and the belief that jobs are no longer for life, there is the need to take an increasingly long-term view of business performance,” she explains.“Corporates are under pressure from City analysts to both identify their future leaders and to ensure the organisation has real future value. Inevitably, much of that long-term value revolves around the strength of the CEO.”The key to succession planning, adds Gear, is that it should be inextricably linked to overall business strategy, and should involve the whole organisation, not just HR.Heir and a spareSo how long should an organisation plan for? Should the succession scheme be restricted to finding an ‘heir and a spare’ – as practised by monarchs of old – or should it be in force for the most trivial of eventualities?In defiance of traditional top-tier-only talent development schemes, a growing number of business leaders, including Bill Gates – who recently asked the head of each country in the Microsoft empire for a detailed presentation on the succession plan – believe that planning for ‘what if’ should spread throughout the organisation.Douglas Barnett, risk control strategy manager at Axa Insurance, believes that the succession plan should be seen as a high priority in these days of ‘no fat, no waste’ management and that HR should take ownership of the process.However, Kate Banks, group talent manager at Axa, disagrees. She believes that responsibility for succession arrangements should be handed over to the managers themselves. “If there’s a vacancy, we want our managers to look first at the succession plan but not to become slaves to it,” she says. “If the person expected to move into a role is still right for the job and they want it, then fine. If they aren’t interested, perhaps the succession plan should be torn up and a new one started.”Where Barnett and Banks do agree is on the vital role played by people in all aspects of business continuity. “Having the right people lined up to fill positions should be on a par with having the right terms and conditions or legal compliance,” says Barnett. “Whether it is holiday cover, sick leave, maternity, resignation or retirement, organisations need to be proactive on the issue of succession.” And it is important to recognise that the departure of a junior member of staff could have as great an impact on some parts of the business as the resignation of a key director.“Of course, it is vital that the next CEO of an oil company or bank is identified and groomed for succession, but that’s already understood,” says Barnett. “If you’re a young company, such as an online trader, where the key interface with the public is via mail order, then knowing who will run the mailroom if Tom walks under a bus is absolutely vital to your company and its reputation.”Britvic, which floated on the stock exchange in December, says that each of its 3,000 staff are given an individual set of ‘personal business objectives’, which are discussed and formulated with line managers on entry to the company, and can help them move to the next rung of the ladder.Yet the company believes that pure succession planning is of more relevance to senior management. It has recently appointed seven staff into ‘cross-functional’ roles, so they can learn about different aspects to the business on top of their own areas of expertise. “We feel this is a reflection of the strength of the system we already have in place,” says Shaun O’Hara, Britvic’s head of talent management and learning. “To develop our senior managers or leaders of the future, we have a high-potential assessment process in place that assesses candidates against a set of differentiators specifically designed for Britvic.”All candidates receive a feedback report, which can then help them plan their development. The successful ones enter a senior management development programme.Secret successorsTraditionally, banks or retailers have kept their succession plans largely secret – fearful that by giving the nod to ambitious employees and not to the happy-go-lucky ones, they might lose a key member of the team (albeit one who was unlikely ever to receive a key to the executive washroom).Today’s succession planning environment is far more transparent, says Barnett. “If it’s all done in secret by a committee and your career is mapped out for you behind your back,” he says, “then you may well feel aggrieved – particularly if you learn that you are not actually part of the succession plan.”He adds: “It must be made clear to all staff that discussion around succession is ongoing, not fixed, and that while someone may not be a key employee this time around, their role may be more pivotal, or the nature of the business radically different, by the time the next review takes place.”Organisations also need to adapt their succession strategies as the dynamics of the business change.“In one period, a firm may need to have a very cost-driven CEO, while in another, it may need an innovator who invests in new product development,” explains Gear. “For this reason, it is vital to have a number of individuals who could be considered CEO material, and it is important to keep the succession plan fluid rather than fixed.”Political parties often learn the succession lesson the hard way. In the business world, plenty of forward planning and flexibility mean this needn’t be the case.Every little helps at TescoAt Tesco, where virtually every member of the board has worked their way up through the business, succession planning “forms an important part of the career development and training of our people at all levels”, according to Claire Peters, resourcing and training manager.The supermarket chain has an ‘Options’ management training scheme for staff wishing to progress from, for example, general assistant to section leader. In addition, the company has a ‘Talent Spotting’ programme that is far broader and involves a career discussion for every member of staff each year. It has benefits, says the retailer, for the individual and the organisation.“Individuals’ skills are assessed, opportunities developed and people with the right skills can be matched to the right jobs when vacancies arise,” says Peters. “At the same time, individuals can be developed to meet the needs of the business.” Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article Succession planning: Mind the gapOn 21 Feb 2006 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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Archer secures multi-well P&A contract for modular rig Archer Topaz in UKCS

first_imgArcher’s rig has been contracted by TAQA to perform a twenty-one well plug and abandonment campaign Archer secures multi-well P&A contract. (Credit: C Morrison from Pixabay) Archer today announces its formal contract award for provision of modular drilling unit and associated services by TAQA.“We are delighted with the award of this contract which secures the rig work until late 2023.” said Dag Skindlo, Chief Executive Officer of Archer.Archer’s rig has been contracted by TAQA to perform a twenty-one well plug and abandonment campaign for their Northern North Sea Cormorant Alpha platform.The integrated P&A service delivery will include services provided by Archer’s Engineering, Rentals, Oiltools and Wireline divisions, and will also require Archer to manage and deliver cementing, swarf and re-injection services from 3rd party providers.The Archer Topaz is estimated to mobilise to Cormorant Alpha in second half of 2021 following the removal of the existing Cormorant Alpha integral derrick equipment set, and reactivation activities on the platform by Archer’s Engineering division. Source: Company Press Releaselast_img read more

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Bill to strengthen SBA’s 7(a) loan program oversight introduced

first_imgBipartisan legislation was introduced yesterday to increase the Small Business Administration’s (SBA) oversight authority over its 7(a) loan program. Credit unions actively participate in the program, which helps credit unions mitigate loan risk and maximize small-business lending within their statutory member business loan (MBL) cap.Each credit union loan dollar backed by SBA is excluded from the credit union’s MBL cap.The bill, the Small Business 7(a) Lending Oversight and Reform Act, was introduced by Senate Small Business and Entrepreneurship Committee Chairman Jim Risch, R-Idaho, House Small Business Committee Chairman Steve Chabot, R-Ohio, and respective Ranking Members Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., and Nydia Velázquez, D-N.Y.The proposed legislation would: continue reading » 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Time to end inaction on safety of schools

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion I stared at the TV screen in horror. A breaking news report read: “School Shooting in Greenville.” Children had been rushed to nearby Greenville Medical Center, conditions unknown. I was barely able to breathe, for my grandsons attend school in Greenville, N.Y.  Their father, a physician, owns Greenville Medical Center near the school.It wasn’t until I heard the words “in Greenville, South Carolina” that I stopped shaking. My heart broke, however, for the parents in South Carolina. Their lives were changed forever, and for a few minutes, I understood their agony. Recently, in Texas, more children were killed in school. Every community faces this crisis. High school students are begging officials to make schools safe. They want safety devices to stop a shooter from entering their school, killing innocent children and staff. “Do something,” our lawmakers tell one another – but nothing is getting done.There are a number of suggestions to deter school shooters. Do we put armed officials in schools? Screen students? Use X-ray machines? Do we use security card access and searches? Entry-control equipment? It’s well past the time to implement school safety plans.We all agree something must be done. Why not create a strategy for our own neighborhood schools? Hold community forums to gather ideas from our students, teachers and taxpayers. Create a plan for our students’ safety. Set up funding to implement it. These are our schools and our children.  It’s time to “do something” ourselves.Shelly DobskiRotterdamMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Car hits garage in Rotterdam Sunday morning; Garage, car burnlast_img read more

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‘Wear a mask if you care’, task force says as WHO warns of aerosol transmission

first_imgOn Thursday, the WHO released new guidelines encouraging people to avoid crowds and ensure good ventilation, explaining that some outbreak reports related to crowded indoor spaces have suggested the possibility of aerosol transmission. This is in addition to contact with contaminated surfaces or with infected people who spread the virus through droplets released when they cough, sneeze, speak or sing.Therefore, Mahardika urged public service providers to ensure the use of natural ventilation such as opening doors and windows.On the other hand, he said, using exhaust fans was an alternative to help lower transmission potential in indoor spaces.“We can reduce the viral load in the air by propelling the air through an exhaust vent.”Mahardika reiterated that wearing masks should not be based on fear of contracting the virus but rather the awareness that anyone — including ourselves — could be a carrier and might infect others.“Wear a mask if you care about the people around you.” The two experts emphasized that chances for transmission could be minimized if people wore masks.Read also: WHO acknowledges ‘evidence emerging’ of airborne spread of COVID-19“Contagion is likely to occur in closed buildings with ACs, but if the people inside wear masks and maintain physical distancing, then the potential of transmission is much lower. Wearing masks remains a top preventive measure,” Budiman, who is also a microbiologist at the University of Indonesia (UI), said during a press briefing on Friday.“The mask stops any particles from the individual’s mouth and nose from traveling into the air.” The national COVID-19 task force has encouraged the public to keep wearing masks to prevent the transmission of the novel coronavirus, following a recent report by the World Health Organization that acknowledges the virus may be transmitted through the air.  According to I Gusti Ngurah Mahardika, a Udayana University virologist who is also part of the task force’s expert staff, airborne transmission was possible in crowded indoor spaces such as malls, offices, restaurants and public transportation that had air conditioning (AC) instead of natural ventilation.Another expert staffer, Budiman Bela, said transmission potential was higher in rooms and indoor spaces where the air was cold because the virus tended to be more stable at low temperatures.center_img Topics :last_img read more

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AREC 2019: Todd Duncan’s tips to survive a tough property market

first_img Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:51Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:51 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD576p576p432p432p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenStarting your hunt for a dream home00:51 “I’m going to be positive in a market where everyone else is negative,” he said.More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa11 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days ago“It began attracting business to me like a bee to honey.”That became what set him apart and he encouraged agents, buyers and sellers to have a similar mindset, particularly in the current climate.“There’s very little difference in people but the little difference is the big difference,” he said, referring to a quote that helped guide him.“The little difference is attitude, the big difference is whether it’s positive or negative.”Duncan said attitude helped agents, buyers and sellers build trusting relationships with each other that would stand the test of time if nurtured long after the initial transaction.“Trust is your superpower,” he said.In part two of his presentation High trust selling: How to make more money in less time with less stress, Mr Duncan discussed the importance of developing an emotional connection with buyers and sellers.He said many agents focused too much on getting a sale instead of helping their clients getting the outcomes they wanted. Todd Duncan says the key to success in the property industry is trust and confidence. Supplied: McGrathTRUST and confidence are the key to tackling a tough property market, sales entrepreneur and best-selling author Todd Duncan says.He reiterated the words in his opening presentation of the Australasian Real Estate Conference at the Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre on Sunday.Having entered the industry straight after graduating at the tender age of 23, he attributed confidence to not only his survival as a real estate broker in a “seemingly impossible market” but also his success.“I began to understand early on, this is not for wimps,” he said.He held his head high and wore a badge that said ‘rumour has it we’re in a recession, I’m not participating’ in a bid to show his commitment to help buyers and sellers find the home of their dreams.center_img [email protected]last_img read more

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China baby hatch forced to close

first_imgHealthInternationalLifestylePrint China baby hatch forced to close by: – March 17, 2014 Share Share 53 Views   one comment Tweetcenter_img Sharing is caring! More than 20 baby hatches have been opened across ChinaA baby hatch in southern China has been forced to suspend work after hundreds of infants were abandoned, overwhelming the centre, its director says.More than 260 children had been left at the welfare home in Guangzhou since 28 January, director Xu Jiu added.Staff will continue caring for babies already at the welfare home, all of whom suffer from illnesses, Mr Xu said.China introduced the centres so parents could abandon infants safely rather than leaving them in the streets.Supporters say the baby hatches save lives, but critics say they encourage parents to abandon their children.Mr Xu announced the suspension on Sunday, saying that 262 babies had been left at the centre since the scheme began in January.“I hope everyone understands the difficulties the welfare centre faces,” Mr Xu told Xinhua news agency.“We are temporarily closing the centre [to new babies] so that we can properly care for the infants already at the centre.”Baby hatches generally contain an incubator, a delayed alarm device, an air conditioner and a baby bedThe centre, which also cares for orphans, has 1,000 beds.However, it currently houses 1,121 babies and young people, with another 1,274 in the care of foster families, Guangzhou’s Municipal Civil Affairs Bureau said.All the abandoned infants had illnesses, such as cerebral palsy, Down’s syndrome and congenital heart disease, the bureau added.It is thought that many parents abandon ill babies because they fear they cannot afford the medical care required.Abandoning children is illegal in China. However, authorities believe that the hatches give the infants a better chance of survival than if they were left in the street.A total of 25 baby hatches have been established in 10 provincial regions in China, Xinhua reports.Under China’s strict population control policies, most couples have only been allowed to have one child and there is a strong preference for healthy baby boys.In December, China’s top legislature formally adopted a resolution easing the one-child policy, allowing couples to have two children if either parent is an only child.Provinces are now determining when to relax their restrictions at a local level, with some acting already.BBC News Sharelast_img read more

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Ighalo: I’d save my money as a boy to see Man Utd at local viewing centre

first_img Loading… Promoted Content11 Greatest Special Effects Movies Of All TimeBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeBest Car Manufacturers In The WorldBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Them9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A TattooThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read More6 Extreme Facts About Hurricanes20 “The Big Bang Theory” Moments Only A Few Fans Knew About2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This YearDeepika Padukone’s Most Memorable LooksWho’s The Best Car Manufacturer Of All Time?Is This The Most Delicious Food In The World? Ighalo is now living out his dream leading the line for United. He recalled to BBC Sport: “When I was growing up, I knew a lot about football because I saw some of my grown-up siblings watching football on TV and they supported Manchester United. “Sometimes you would listen to commentary on the radio. Sometimes you would go out to watch at the viewing centre because some of us didn’t have the opportunity to subscribe or pay to watch.Advertisement Odion Ighalo has admitted he would save his money as a young boy in Nigeria to watch Manchester United at the local viewing centre. “During the week, you had to save every day from Monday to Friday to be able to do that, so I’m happy I did that because my life was all about football. I played football and I watched my team and it was one of those things I cherished every weekend. “You’d get ready, wash your jersey, and go out and support your darling team. You had to save for it because without, you can’t watch. “Sometimes you would just go there and see, if you were lucky if someone would pay for you or sneak you in, but sometimes it wasn’t possible. Sometimes you would just hear if they scored – when they shouted ‘goal’ when Man Utd scored – and you would wait outside until the game finished, you got the result of the game and then you would go home happy. Read Also:Ighalo named Man of the Match in Europa League win “To be the first Nigerian to play for Manchester United is a great achievement for me which I am going to cherish for the rest of my life because it’s not easy to dream something and it comes true. It’s a great feeling.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 last_img read more

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President, Two Others Step Down From Foundation

first_imgThree members of the Rising Sun Regional Foundation announced their retirement at a board meeting this week.Foundation President Marianne Wiggers, Ed Sullivan, Executive Director, and Jascia Redwine, Associate Director will step down at the end of this year.“Speaking for all three of us, I think I can say that our association with RSRF has been a terrific experience for these many years, especially in light of what the foundation has been able to achieve as compared to what was envisioned in mid-1996 when it was created and incorporated by then Rising Sun Mayor Mark, Guard, Monte Denbo, consultant to the city for the Grand Victoria Casino project, and Neil Comer, legal counsel to the City of Rising Sun at the time,” said Marianne Wiggers, the sole serving founding board member and elected president for the full 17 years of the foundation.The following foundation achievements were highlighted at the board meeting:• Awarding to date over $27 million in total grants, which have been instrumental in leveraging approximately $320 million in additional government, foundation, and personal contributions to over 1,300 grant projects in the region;• Assisting in creating through both multi-year grants and staff technical assistance, four new community foundations in Dearborn, Ohio, Ripley, and Switzerland counties that already have and will continue to comprise a major philanthropic resource in the region for many years to come;• Granting some $780,000 in personal $1,000 scholarships to graduating seniors of all of the schools in the RSRF region;• Providing both professional consulting services and granting several millions of dollars for a very aggressive education technology program for all of the school corporations in the RSRF region;• Awarding grants and providing professional consulting services in the program areas of both economic and retirement community development in Rising Sun and Ohio County;• And, most recently, creating a unique economic development partnership with another local nonprofit organization, Rising Sun/Ohio County First, Inc., to which RSRF is providing an $8.2 million loan from its Reserve Funds to build and own a new 104-room hotel in Rising Sun that will be both opened next month and leased to the current casino owner, Full House Resorts, Inc., to increase the hotel room capacity by 50% of its Rising Star Casino.Wiggers concluded, “I have been privileged to represent the Ripley County towns of Holton, Milan, Napoleon, Osgood, and Versailles on the foundation’s board and plan to continue both my work and my membership on several other nonprofit organizations in Ripley County for the foreseeable future.”last_img read more

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Lady Bulldogs Win 3-Way Golf Meet

first_imgThe Batesville Lady Bulldogs defeated the Greensburg Lady Pirates and theLawrenceburg Lady Tigers at The Greensburg Country Club by a score of 197Batesville, 203 Greensburg, and 254 Lawrenceburg.Madison McCreary-Batesville was meet medalist with a 39.Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Tom Meyer.last_img

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