Dave Matthews Featured In New Musical-Themed Nature Program On Discovery Channel

first_imgA new Discovery Channel show is mixing the nature and music worlds, as the six-part series will use specific music from six prominent recording artists to tell various stories of the wild. All six musicians have a keen love for nature, and the themed episodes will be an engaging way to tell these animal stories.The six musicians featured include Usher, Christina Aguliera, Joan Jett, Ellie Goulding, Steven Tyler and Dave Matthews. Rich Ross, group president of Discovery Channel, Animal Planet and Science Channel, told The Hollywood Reporter, “All of these artists bring a powerful love for wildlife and the environment, and we cannot wait to share these films with families across the world… As we’re faced daily with news and information about the declining state of our natural world, this series brings a hopeful message that bridges generations to inspire conservationists of any age.”Matthews’ episode in particular will be focused on the song “Save Me,” and will feature three animals – rhinos, spadefoot toads and manatees – searching for fresh water that they depend on for life. Other episodes include Joan Jett’s “Bad Reputation” with animals who get bad raps, Goulding’s “Something In The Way You Move” with animals on the quest to find mates, and Usher’s “Stronger” with the resiliency of a sea turtle and red fox.The show is titled Hello World!, and is set to premiere on Discovery on July 9th. Presented in association with the World Wildlife Fund (WWF), this should be a great series that nature lovers of all ages can enjoy.Just imagine “Save Me” as the soundtrack to a nature show! We’ll let you listen below…last_img read more

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Watch Joe Dart & Lake Street Dive’s Bridget Kearney Trade Bass Solos At A Dublin Vulfpeck Show

first_img[Video: Wayne Whistler] [Video: Maurizio Pittau] On October 1st, the fan-favorite funk act Vulfpeck continued their European tour at Dublin’s Olympia Theatre, kicking off a two-night run in Ireland’s capital ahead of this weekend’s two-night tour closer in London. During the performance, the band offered up the live debuts of both “Grandma” off 2017’s Mr. Finish Line and “Lost My Treble Long Ago”, a recent single from mid-September that was released when the group announced their new album, Hill Climber, due out in December. However, the surprises at the Dublin show didn’t stop there, as the band welcoming out Lake Street Dive bassist Bridget Kearney during a take on “Beastly”.Following the group’s ‘TED Talk”, which saw frontman Jack Stratton hyping up the crowd with a hilariously dry and straightfaced seminar, the band moved into “Back Pocket”, giving bassist Joe Dart time to truly move into the spotlight with the song’s now-famed bassline. From there, Vulfpeck quickly moved into “Beastly”, with Joe Dart continuing to propel the song. Eventually, Bridget Kearney was welcomed out with an acoustic standup bass in tow during the number, and both Bridget and Joe swapped virtuosic bass solos during the peak of the tune. Notably, Bridget is no stranger to the extended Vulfpeck family—she has previously toured with Theo Katzmann, serving as support and frequently sitting in with the band during his solo shows.From there, Vulfpeck covered U2‘s “I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For”, a song selection that no doubt paid homage to the Irish crowd, before closing out their set with two fan-favorite numbers, “Christmas In L.A.” and “Dean Town”. The group then returned for a three-song encore, offering up the more recent “Birds Of A Feather, We Rock Together” off Mr. Finish Line, in addition to more classic fare, “Outro” and “It Gets Funkier”.You can check out two full videos of Vulfpeck’s collaboration with Lake Street Dive bassist Bridget Kearney below.last_img read more

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Student achievement stuck in the middle

first_imgA new study of international and U.S. state trends in student achievement growth shows that the United States is squarely in the middle of a group of 49 nations in fourth- and eighth-grade test-score gains in math, reading, and science over the period 1995-2009.Students in three countries — Latvia, Chile, and Brazil — are improving at a rate of 4 percent of a standard deviation annually, roughly two years’ worth of learning or nearly three times that of the United States. Students in another eight countries — Portugal, Hong Kong, Germany, Poland, Lichtenstein, Slovenia, Colombia, and Lithuania — are making gains at twice the rate of U.S. students.The report, “Is the United States Catching Up? International and State Trends in Student Achievement,” is being released by Harvard’s Program on Education Policy and Governance (PEPG). Eric A. Hanushek, Paul E. Peterson, and Ludger Woessmann conducted the study, which is available online. An article based on the report will appear in the fall issue of Education Next and was available today online.Compared with gains made by students in other countries, “progress within the United States is middling, not stellar,” notes Peterson, Harvard professor and PEPG director, with 24 countries trailing the U.S. rate of improvement and another 24 that appear to be improving at a faster rate. While U.S. students’ performance on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) tests improved in absolute terms between 1995 and 2011, U.S. progress was not sufficiently rapid to allow it to catch up with the leaders of the industrialized world.Rates of improvement varied among states. Maryland had the steepest achievement growth trend, followed by Florida, Delaware, and Massachusetts. Between 1992 and 2011, these states posted growth rates of 3.1 to 3.3 percent of a standard deviation annually, well over a full year’s worth of learning during the time period. The U.S. average of 1.6 standard deviations was about half that of the top states.The other six states among the top 10 improvers were Louisiana, South Carolina, New Jersey, Kentucky, Arkansas, and Virginia. States with the largest gains are improving at two to three times the rate of states with the smallest gains — such as Iowa, Maine, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin.The study raises questions about education goal setting in the United States, which “has often been utopian rather than realistic,” according to Eric Hanushek, who cites the 1990 governors’ goal calling for the U.S. to be “first in the world in math and science by 2000” as an example. More realistic expectations would call for states to move closer to annual growth rates of the most-improving states. These gains would, over a 15- to 20-year period, “bring the United States within the range of the world’s leaders.”Other findings include:States in which students improved the most overall were also the states that had the largest percentage reduction in students with very low achievement.Southern states, which began to adopt education reform measures in the 1990s, outpaced Midwestern states, where school reform made little headway until very recently. Five of the top 10 states were in the South, and no Southern states were in the bottom 18.No significant correlation was found between increased spending on education and test score gains. For example, Maryland, Massachusetts, and New Jersey posted large gains in student performance after boosting spending, but New York, Wyoming, and West Virginia had only marginal test-score gains to show from increased expenditures.International results are based on 28 administrations of comparable math, science, and reading tests over the period 1995-2009. The authors adjusted both the mean and the standard deviation of each international test, allowing them to estimate trends on the international tests on a common scale normed to the 2000 NAEP tests. Student performance on 36 administrations of math, reading, and science tests in 41 U.S. states was examined over a 19-year period (1992-2011), allowing for a comparison of these states with each other. For more information on the study and its methodology, please see an unabridged version of the report, which is available at http://www.hks.harvard.edu/pepg/ and at www.educationnext.org.last_img read more

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Charles Stang named Director of Center for the Study of World Religions

first_img Read Full Story Charles Stang, professor of early Christian thought, has been appointed the next director of the Center for the Study of World Religions (CSWR) at Harvard Divinity School, beginning July 1. He will succeed Francis X. Clooney, S.J., Parkman Professor of Divinity and Professor of Comparative Theology, who is stepping down after leading the Center for seven years.Stang joined the HDS faculty in 2008 as assistant professor of early Christian Thought after earning his doctor of theology degree from the School the same year. He has been a member of the CSWR community for just under a decade and has participated in the CSWR’s advisory board.“Professor Stang has been a major contributor to the thinking about the future of CSWR,” said HDS Dean David N. Hempton. “I know his plans include efforts to continue to expand the engagement of the HDS community in the work of the Center. As an active participant in the larger Harvard University community, Professor Stang will also concentrate on continuing to draw our colleagues closer into the CSWR.”His research and teaching focus on the history and theology of Christianity in late antiquity, especially Eastern varieties of Christianity.“I am grateful, and humbled, to have been chosen to serve as the next director of the Center for the Study of World Religions,” Stang said. “I look forward to working with residents, staff, and my HDS colleagues to imagine and enact the next chapter in the life of the Center.”last_img read more

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Cloud Marketplace in the News: A Strategy Built Around You

first_imgProducts, platforms, service offerings—such is the typical news stream coming out of big tech events like VMworld Las Vegas and its EMEA twin, held this week in Barcelona.For Dell EMC, it’s a different story.In August, we used our VMworld Vegas presence to make a different kind of announcement, one that we call The Cloud Marketplace.The Cloud Marketplace is not a product, group of products or even a place to purchase products. It’s an expression of our cloud strategy, which includes cloud platforms, cloud-enabled infrastructure, cloud consulting services, and cloud consumption models, all built around the way IT professionals experience cloud today.The emphasis of the Marketplace, however, is on you: how real people engage with cloud resources– whether private, public, hybrid, on-premises or off– to achieve a multi-cloud strategy that delivers what they need, when they need it, with consumption flexibility that works for a variety of situations.That said, we announced a few significant additions this week, two of which align under the Marketplace’s Cloud Platform category:We’re including the newly-updated VxBlock system 1000 to the integrated platform optionThe VxRail appliance integrated platform is updated with new advances for simpler deployment, transparent management, and tighter next-gen VMware integrationIntegrated platforms for the winWhen it comes to implementing a cloud platform, choice is essential, as every organization has unique core competencies and each project its specific goals. Because of this, we develop and organize our cloud platforms across three distinct categories:The DIY cloud building blocks implementation option allows you to design the platform and build it yourself. This option offers the most control of cloud platform design and component choice and will be most adaptable to custom requirements.The Reference Architecture option lets you choose from a list of certified components and assemble your platform to the specifications laid out in a reference architecture. This reduces configuration risk and accelerates project timeline. While this option is less flexible in terms of component choices, it provides peace of mind regarding the compatibility of system components and preferred software packages.With the Integrated cloud platform implementation option, you purchase a pre-engineered cloud platform that can be up-and-running in a relatively short amount of time. This option provides the most effortless experience for “day-2” operations, with streamlined update and upgrade procedures taking much of the risk out of ongoing platform management.The integrated platform option includes Dell EMC market-leading converged and hyperconverged architectures, like the newly updated VxRail appliance and VxBlock system. Enterprises worldwide run their VMware-based clouds using these turnkey systems that bring together compute, storage, networking and VMware vSphere virtualization to advance digital transformation and create a more common cloud management experience.While the focus this week is on enhancing our integrated platforms, we continuously investing and innovate across all of cloud platform options to ensure they map to changing customer demands and provide ever-greater value to the data center.Powered by consumptionBehind every great cloud strategy is a consumption model that delivers the right resources at pricing terms that make sense for individual businesses.Dell EMC Cloud Consumption, backed by Dell Financial Services, is a core component of the Cloud Marketplace, providing customers with choice and flexibility in the way they plan their cloud initiatives.Today, we introduced Data Center Utility to our Dell EMC Cloud Marketplace Consumption Model options. As part of the Cloud Marketplace, you’ll find three consumption options that give you the best of both worlds when it comes to building a cloud operating model: all the aspects of control that a private cloud delivers with the benefits of the public cloud consumption experience you’ve come to expect, like elastic capacity, metered usage and an OpEx model.The Flex on Demand option provides elastic capacity with instant access to the right level of resources. A baseline of capacity is provided with additional buffer capacity. Buffer usage is metered to so you only pay for the buffer you use.The Cloud Flex option provides an Opex Model featuring decreasing monthly payments and a flexible return option, so you can use the resources for as little as 12 months.The Data Center Utility option is a custom solution that provides maximum flexibility for resource consumption– with or without professional services. All usage is metered based on a metric determined with each customer **Always be innovatingOur focus on the Marketplace approach to cloud operations helps you make cloud choices based on the way you use cloud resources today—a one-stop shop for evaluating options and gathering information in a complex cloud world. Today’s enhancements to our integrated platforms and cloud consumption options represent an ongoing commitment to continuously evolving our full scope of cloud solutions—from platforms to services to consumption— as your requirements change, innovation forges ahead and new opportunities become available. Read the full news announcement and follow @dellemccloud and to let Dell EMC help shape your multi-cloud strategy.**Payment solutions provided and serviced by Dell Financial Services L.L.C. or its affiliate or designee (“DFS”) for qualified customers. Offers may not be available or may vary in certain countries. Where available offers may be changed without notice and are subject to product availability, applicable law, credit approval, documentation provided by and acceptable to DFS and may be subject to minimum transaction size. Offers not available for personal, family or household use. Dell EMC and the Dell EMC logo are trademarks of Dell Inc. Restrictions and additional requirements may apply to transactions with governmental or public entities)last_img read more

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Indian special-needs school founder speaks at Saint Mary’s

first_imgChitra Shah, the founder and director of Indian non-profit Satya Special School, spoke at the Saint Mary’s Carroll Auditorium on Monday. Satya Special School is the largest rehabilitation program for children with special needs in Pondicherry, India, servicing over 900 children.“I come from a privileged background,” Shah said. “When I say privileged background, I did what I wanted, I wore the clothes that I wanted, I studied the subject that I wanted and finally married the man that I wanted — something that a number of girls in India do not have the privilege of. Finally, when I married into a very wealthy family, I decided that I should give back something.”Shah said her mission to help her community started with a visit to a disabled girl’s home in which she witnessed abuse.“I saw this child tied up to a plastic chair with nylon ropes,” Shah said. “The mom very casually told me, ‘I leave her locked up like this eight hours a day.’ The first thought that crossed my mind was: ‘We keep dogs in a better condition.’”It wasn’t long until Shah realized this wasn’t uncommon in the area.“One of the things that this mom told me was that ‘I’m not the only one who ties up the children; I know so many other mothers who do this,’” Shah said. “So I gathered all these moms up and I asked them, ‘Would you send your children to a center if I started one?’”From there she started the school in 2003 with 20 children. Today the program has over 900 kids across nine centers in India.“There is a huge mythos attached to disabilities [in India],” Shah said. “… The belief is that they committed such a huge sin in the past that the gods have punished them with a special needs child. A child with autism is considered to be possessed by an evil spirit, so these kids are made to walk on fire and sometimes tied up to a tree and whiplashed. So whenever the family understands that they have a special needs child, the mothers are given two options: One is to walk out of the family with the child, or abandon the child.”The centers not only aid in the care and education of children with special needs, but helps build a community for the single mothers left to raise the children alone.“They started understanding that it was more scientific,” Shah said. “It was something else, it was not them. They all sat together and shared for the first time. Women in India would never go to a counselor. You would never go to somebody and share your problem.”Satya Special School has expanded since its start to include hydro, occupational, special education, group and speech therapy. They also include a school readiness program, activity-based learning, learning through visual media, learning practicality, drama as a learning tool, learning through movement and learning through play. Skill and vocational training is taught as well to the older residents. This includes teaching them paper quilting, baking, wood working, cup making and mat weaving.“We are sending out this strong message that there is so much hope,” Shah said. “Yes, you have a child who’s difficult to handle, but yet you can live your life and live it well.”Tags: disabilities, disability, India, Satya Special Schoollast_img read more

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Copley Hospital, nurses renegotiate contract to save $300,000

first_imgIn the spirit of cooperation, Copley Hospital and the United Nurses and Allied Professionals Local 5109 have renegotiated its contract. The newly extended three year contract will create a savings of nearly $300,000.  A tentative agreement on the contract was reached on Tuesday, May 11, and confirmation made on Wednesday, May 12. The original contract was supposed to run through 2011.“I am very impressed with the members of UNAP,” says Mel Patashnick, President of Copley Hospital. “In approving this contract, they demonstrated their understanding of how Copley is affected by the difficult economy. Their care for the long-term well-being of Copley is apparent in the tough decision they made at a time it needed to be made.”“Healthcare is dynamic,” explains Sue Lucas, RN and President of Copley UNAP. “In negotiations with the current administration, we saw responsiveness on the part of both parties to work together to address a critical issue and do what is best for the community and our hospital.”The new contract is effective May 30, 2010 through May 29, 2013. The new contract includes a reduced cost of living wage increase. The hospital has also scaled back on construction projects, capital purchases and travel in addition to increasing operational efficiency to reduce expenses.Both Patashnick and Lucas cited hard work, respect, and a commitment on both sides to patient care and patient safety as key factors in reaching an agreement so quickly. Spource: Copley. 5.14.2010. Morrisvillelast_img read more

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Mitsubishi is the latest Japanese firm to take a second look at coal investments

first_imgMitsubishi is the latest Japanese firm to take a second look at coal investments FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Australian Financial Review ($):Australia’s biggest thermal coal customer is hardening its attitude towards the fuel, with Japan’s biggest bank and one of Japan’s biggest power and mining conglomerates tightening their coal investment policies in recent days.Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group, which is Japan’s largest lender and largest bank by assets, said it was reviewing its lending policies for coal-fired power generation and would limit support to “high-efficiency” generation which helped reduce emissions including through carbon capture and storage. The bank also said its lending would be guided by OECD standards, which encourage lending only to high-efficiency “ultra-supercritical” coal-fired power plants.The comments came just days after Marubeni, which has equity investments in six Australian coal mines and seven Asian power stations, said it would halve its coal-fired generation capacity by 2030 and double the percentage of renewables in its portfolio by 2023.“As a general principle, Marubeni will no longer enter into any new coal-fired power generation business. However, Marubeni might consider pursuing projects that adopt best available technology which at present is ultra-supercritical steam-generating technology,” Marubeni said.The landmark statements from the two companies continue a recent trend among Japan’s top corporations, and highlights the long-term challenge facing Australia’s thermal coal sector, which shipped 41% of its exports to Japan in fiscal 2017.“It is not just Marubeni moving in isolation … It is more representative of a sea change in senior corporate and government thinking in Japan,” said Tim Buckley, from the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, an organisation whose mission is to accelerate the world’s energy transition. “It is a bit like when our big four [Australian] banks all moved two or three years ago.”More ($): Major Japanese banks, traders tighten coal policylast_img read more

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A Sheldon Silver Mystery: Did He Betray New York Renters?

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York When New York enacted a major rent regulation law in 2011, Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver celebrated the passage of the legislation as a victory over real estate interests.“Despite fierce and well-financed opposition to working families in New York City, we were able to secure important victories for tenants,” he said at the time.But the bribery case against Silver unveiled by prosecutors last week raises questions about whether Silver pulled his punches in negotiations on that 2011 bill, potentially at the expense of hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers who live in rent stabilized apartments.A little-scrutinized section of the criminal complaint alleges a luxury developer implicated in the Silver bribery scheme requested changes to the law. The changes were ultimately adopted.The complaint has tenant advocates who lobbied on the bill, known as the Rent Act of 2011, wondering what really happened. For now, it’s a mystery: U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara hasn’t specified what change Silver made on behalf of a developer who was part of the alleged bribery scheme.“It’s hugely important,” says Benjamin Dulchin of the Association for Neighborhood and Housing Development. “I hope Preet Bharara tells us someday.”The complaint itself provides only a bit of detail.With the legislation pending, it says, “the Lobbyists met, on behalf of Developer 1, with Silver in his State office to advocate for certain proposed terms for the new Real Estate Legislation. The legislation that was enacted included Developer 1’s recommendations in substantial part.”“Developer 1” is widely reported to be Glenwood Management, the politically influential firm of centenarian developer Leonard Litwin.So what might Glenwood have wanted out of the legislation?The heart of the fight that year centered on rent regulation, which limits rent increases on about a million units in New York City, including some of Glenwood’s. The state law governing rent regulation comes up for renewal periodically.Landlords can deregulate apartments and begin charging market-rate rents under certain circumstances, such as when an apartment becomes vacant and its rent passes a threshold, at the time $2,000. As a result, over 200,000 units have become deregulated over the past 30 years. In the 2011 negotiations, tenant advocates wanted to stem the flow of units out of the program by tightening the rules. Another focal point was the formula that governs how much landlords can raise rent on regulated apartments when they invest money in improvements.There were other matters the legislation dealt with that could have been of interest to Glenwood Management, including tax exemptions for new development. The firm did not respond to a request for comment.Silver has said he will be vindicated when the case is aired in court. His lawyers did not respond to a request for comment.The ultimate rent deal struck in 2011 among Silver, Gov. Andrew Cuomo, and the state Senate did not please tenant advocates.“Both Cuomo and Silver tried to spin the 2011 bill as a great victory for tenants when in fact there were very minor improvements,” says Michael McKee, the treasurer of the Tenants Political Action Committee, who lobbied on the bill.He says even at the time—long before the alleged bribery scheme between Silver and the developer was known—it wasn’t clear where exactly Silver stood.“Silver was not forthcoming about what he was working to achieve,” McKee says. “Silver always presented himself as pro-tenant, but who knows what happened behind closed doors?”While Silver is seen as more pro-tenant than many others in Albany, including Republicans in the state Senate, tenant advocates have long viewed him as an unreliable ally.The New York Times story reporting the eleventh hour deal on the 2011 law noted that it fell “well short of what many Democrats and tenant activists had hoped for.” Silver was also quoted saying it was time to stop fighting for a stronger package. “I think the days of pushing are over,” Silver said.In last week’s criminal complaint, prosecutors also quote an internal memo from an unnamed real estate developer association.  The memo concluded “in connection with the 2011 rent regulation reauthorization that Silver was considerably more favorable to the real estate industry than expected.” The memo said that “though he may never be the owners advocate, given that the Governor wanted [certain proposals] off the table and wanted to restore his reputation with tenants, it would appear that he (Silver) could have successfully pushed for more.”If the Silver case goes to trial, prosecutors will likely have to flesh out the episode.“Some more favorable treatment specifically by Mr. Silver towards the developers in question will have to be proven, something more concrete than speculation that he was less unfavorable towards the real estate industry in general than he could have been,” says Robert Walker, a government ethics law specialist at Wiley Rein.Have information about this story or a tip? Email me at [email protected] is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative newsroom. Sign up for their newsletter.last_img read more

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Is your credit union more than a member piggy bank?

first_imgDuring a recent dynamic brand workshop working with a credit union partner in the Southeast, a leadership team member made the following observation about their credit union culture: “We must always be more than a place members deposit their money; we must be a safehaven for their trust and dreams.”Wow. That is a profound and emotionally-grounded statement of purpose. Not coincidentally, the best brand cultures are often profound and emotionally-grounded. It was terrific to hear the credit union talk about their brand in such a way after undergoing the brand workshop.Far too many credit unions are viewed by their members as mere piggybanks — simply a place to stash their cash for an undetermined (often limited) amount of time. This also includes lending products. Credit unions building profound and emotionally-grounded brand cultures strive to develop a membership base that is not merely transactional. In other words, as stated above, the relationship transcends transactional and enters the emotional realm of trust and dreams.The only way to ensure this higher realm of member relations is by fostering a unique brand culture. Your leadership team must lead this unique brand culture, every single member of your staff must live it, and then, after time and training, your members will love your brand. Yes, love. The L-word does come into play in brand and culture. To ensure long-lasting and meaningful relationships, even multi-generational relationships, your members must love being a part of your credit union.Empowered staff that know they have both the necessary ongoing training and support of their leadership team are much more likely to build these kinds of relationships. This means not just talking to members, but more importantly, actively listening to them.A few friendly challenge questions regarding your credit union brand culture:Do you have a leadership team in place that is prepared to look at the credit union brand as a profound and emotionally-grounded cornerstone of your culture?Is your credit union making the investments (time, logistics, money, personnel, etc.) to ensure a profound brand culture permeates every level of your financial institution?Are you training staff to live this kind of brand? Subsequently, do you hold staff accountable to brand standards and, critically, do you offer quick and sincere praise for positively living the brand?Do you have a credit union staffed by brand ambassadors, free and empowered to do what it takes to develop amazing member relationships, or are you staffed by robots who are ill-prepared (and even perhaps hesitant or scared) to step out of the box and make member brand magic happen? Are you a safe place for members to learn and dream or are you a cashbox? 30SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Mark Arnold Mark Arnold is an acclaimed speaker, brand expert and strategic planner helping businesses such as credit unions and banks achieve their goals with strategic marketing insights and energized training. Mark … Web: www.markarnold.com Details You already know this but it’s a tough world out there for credit unions. It is probably also not a shocker it will continue to get tougher. Brand is not all fluff and pretty words on the page. Brand is commitment. Brand is investment. Brand is all-consuming. Brand is also, however the future of successful credit unions.Piggybacks are often smashed open with a hammer to get the money inside. Safehavens, however are more sacred and enduring realms. Which is your credit union?last_img read more

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