Five Alarm Funk Shares Behind-The-Scenes Video Making Their Upcoming Album [Premiere]

first_imgEight piece groove rockers Five Alarm Funk are one of the most exciting bands on the Vancouver scene, bringing their uniquely exciting sound to venues all across the continent! Rooted in the funk sound, the band merges influences from Latin music, progressive rock, ska, and more to make something that’s totally their own. But it all comes together with the tight-laced grooves that can only be found in funky, groovy music.The band is set to release their sixth studio album, Sweat, on March 3rd. If it’s anything like their previous five releases, our hopes are particularly high. The band has been nominated for awards on some of their latest albums, all fueled by their groove heavy approach. “Sweat is the culmination of over a decade of writing and playing music together,” says drummer/vocalist Tayo Branston. “It’s by far the hottest, funkiest work we have ever created!”To get you excited for the new release, we’ve teamed up with Five Alarm Funk to share their new behind the scenes video making the new album, set to the music of new song “DDPP.” “‘DDPP’ is a throwback to the 1980’s break dance battle scene,” says Branston. “The goal was to create an up-tempo break beat that had the attributes of an early hip hop dance track, but in a vibe that blended Five Alarm Funk’s powerful, relentless sound.”You can check out the new behind-the-scenes video for Sweat, posted below.Pre-orders for the new album and all information about the band can be found on their official website! Don’t miss an opportunity to catch this exciting crew at a venue near you.[Cover photo via Maggie MacPherson]last_img read more

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From the islands to the bayous

first_img <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRuPbqnL4Hg” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/oRuPbqnL4Hg/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> It was 1997 in the Canary Islands and Thenesoya V. Martín De la Nuez, then 18, was struck by the voice of a Louisiana man singing a Creole version of a Spanish poem.“I was so moved, I cried. Here was an American, a U.S. citizen — and he was speaking like us, like Canary Islanders,” Martín says.Delacroix Highway, La.The emotional connection sent her on a mission to chronicle the fading culture of the descendants of Canary Islanders who settled in Spanish Louisiana in the 18th century.Her research gained urgency in 2005 when news reports of Canarians rocked by the destruction of Hurricane Katrina compelled her to reach out to members of the diaspora community and meet them face-to-face.Now a Ph.D. candidate at Harvard’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS) and a teaching fellow in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, Martín’s research has bloomed into a sprawling cultural documentary project, traveling photo exhibit, and book.Wimpy Serigne, St. Bernard Parish, La.The book will incorporate more than 100 interviews and 8,000 photographs collected during four years of fieldwork with her husband, photojournalist Aníbal Martel, which help make up the Cislanderus project. The name is a sort of acronym of Canary Islanders and U.S. that also intends “us” to emphasize the commonalities.Martín said the book “will be a story of cultural survival, investigating how the complex Canarian cultural legacy has survived or, in most cases, been reinvented in a complicated process of cultural nostalgia.”Top: Thenesoya Martin and Aníbal Martel exhibit their work at a Canary Islands museum. Above, clockwise from top left, Martin conducts fieldwork, reading family records with a Canary Islands descendant in San Antonio, Texas; interviewing Tini Perez of St. Bernard Parish, La., who retains a vestigial Spanish from the Islands; meeting with a Baton Rouge, La., Canarian; and researching 18th century church records in Louisiana.“I had been reading for years, but I was always missing something,” she said. “The faces of people. Where are they? Who are they? Do they seem like Canary Islanders right now?“I didn’t have any idea of how they looked, how they dressed, where they lived or what they did. I wanted to be there. I wanted to understand how their cultural legacy developed over three centuries. I wanted to understand how successive waves of immigration and migration from the Spanish peninsula and the Caribbean, as well as marriages into the Cajun community, shaped and affected that legacy.”Joseph and Selena Gonzalez, Yscloskey, St. Bernard Parish, La.The couple began their investigations in Delacroix Island, Shell Beach, and Reggio, unincorporated communities in St. Bernard Parish, New Orleans, then followed a complicated map of Canary Island descendants scattered throughout Louisiana, including around Baton Rouge and the lower Mississippi River. Today they have expanded their fieldwork to San Antonio, Texas.“We want to document the present,” Martín said. “It’s the book I looked for at the beginning, but it didn’t exist. So I am writing it.”Dot Benge, above, and Jerry Alfonso, top, of St. Bernard Parish, La.A Canarian from Baton Rouge, La.Sign documenting Canarian immigrants’ boats, St. Bernard, La.Barataria, one of the four Canarian settlements in Louisiana.Sunset in the bayous beyond the retaining wall, South New Orleans.Henry Jr. Rodriguez, St. Bernard Parish, La.In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, a sunken boat in Dalacroix Island, South New Orleans, above, and an elevated home in Hopedale, La., below.Felice Lopez Melerine, St. Bernard, La.Thomas Gonzales, Delacroix Island, La.Canarian cemetery, St. Bernard, La.Bayou, Hopedale, La.Pier and pelicans, Hopedale, St. Bernard Parish, La.Florisant Highway, South New Orleans.Henry Martinez and his grandson Kim fish the bayous.Bayou, Shell Beach, La.Thenesoya Martin in San Antonio, Texas.Erwinville, La.last_img read more

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Landscape Updates.

first_imgLandscape professionals must know a mind-boggling array of things to keep the world around us pretty. To help them stay abreast, the University of Georgia and other institutions will offer regional updates Oct. 9 in Dunwoody, Ga., and Oct. 17 in Augusta, Ga.While the programs aren’t exactly alike, each begins at 8 a.m. and ends at 3:30 p.m. Each has a session on the Georgia Certified Landscape Professional program.Each has updates on such topics as weed, insect and disease control and winter annuals for high-impact color. And each will close with an outdoor, hands-on activity.Where to GoThe Dunwoody program will be in building C, room 1100, at Georgia Perimeter College. A map to the Dunwoody campus is on the college’s Web site.The Augusta program is in the Medical College of Georgia Alumni Center on 15th Street. The college’s Web site has a campus map.The $20 fee covers lunch and breaks. Sign up by Oct. 2 for Dunwoody and Oct. 10 for Augusta. For more information, call (706) 542-2861.last_img read more

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A Long Distance Runner Selects his Go-To Gear

first_imgErick White wasn’t always a long-distance runner. The 23-year-old Philadelphia native grew up playing soccer and running the 800 on his school’s track team, but after moving to Atlanta in August, he discovered his love (and talent) for running distance. This year, White won the StumpJump 15K, a fast, technical trail race on Lookout Mountain outside of Chattanooga, and placed fourth overall at the Georgia Marathon. It was White’s first time running a marathon, and the finish earned him the chance to compete in the Boston Marathon in the fall. The StumpJump win was just as surprising to White. “I hadn’t raced on trails in years, and then it was all singletrack so there’s no room to maneuver,” White says. “The terrain was so different than most races—rocky, trails that aren’t well defined. Honestly, I’m surprised I didn’t get lost.”White, who races for Front Runners, Atlanta’s LGBT running club, is still getting used to running in the Southern heat. But he’s enjoying exploring Atlanta’s surprisingly robust trail scene. “Running is such a great way to relieve stress. It’s so meditative, and you can always find a good group of people to run with.”We asked White to detail the gear he relies on during his runs. Here’s his minimalist take on running gear.Mizuno Wave Rider 20 ($120)I have to run in these. I have a light pronation, and these provide good stability. They’re lightweight, but really soft. And they make a waterproof version now.Feeture Elite Merino ($16.99)I like the slim, snug feel of these socks, and they don’t rub or chafe on my ankle. There’s no toe seam, and the Merino wool wicks pretty well.Columbia Montrail Caldarado II ($120)A featherweight 10.4 ounces, these nimble trail shoes are quick and responsive on technical terrain. Completely redesigned, the Caldarado II features an easy-fit, fully integrated tongue and a seamless toe cap. Built for speed on rugged trails, these shoes offer a fun, fast, fluid ride.Under Armour No Breaks ($60)I’m always looking to cut weight, so I usually run without a shirt, and I prefer wearing split shirts. In the winter, I run warm and I can handle the cold pretty well. But if it’s really cold, I make sure I have tights on my legs to keep them warm. I like Under Armour No Breaks tights. These have built-in briefs, a key pocket and just enough compression in the fabric.Showers Pass Crosspoint Hardshell Gloves ($95)These are the gloves you want for winter adventure in the mountains. Waterproof, rugged, and durable, they can handle rip-roaring snowsports action or burly winter summits. Yet they are also flexible and maneuverable, providing outstanding dexterity. Most importantly, they keep digits toasty warm even on frigid nights in the backcountry.AfterShokz Titanium Trekz Headphones ($130)Lightweight and sweatproof, these wireless bluetooth headphones use bone conduction technology and an open-ear design to provide stereo sound and crystal clear communication while still allowing you to hear your surroundings safely.Electric Knoxville XL-S ($120)These lightweight, full-coverage frames are built for performance. Polarized polycarbonate lenses protect from UV and blue light, and the scratch-resistant, hydrophobic lens coatings hold up well on rugged backcountry outings.The Marathon Stick ($31.95)I always bring The Stick to roll out my legs before and after the run. I think it helps with recovery after a long run.Gel Blocks ($2.79)Obviously, food is important on longer runs. I like those Clif Gel Blocks. I can manage to keep a few of them in my shorts while I’m running. Sometimes I keep it simple with oranges and bananas too, for the electrolytes. Those Sport Beans do well too. They’re quick and easy and I can get them down without too much effort.last_img read more

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Belize Provides Educational Alternative for the Youth

first_imgBy Geraldine Cook/ Diálogo May 10, 2019 Through the window of the juvenile detention center, Delrick Sankey watched as students executed military drills at the Belize Youth Challenge Program (BYC) across the street, and wished to be among them. He was 14 years old and serving a nine-month sentence in Belize City. “I was an at-risk youth. I didn’t have self-esteem and didn’t know what to do with my life,” said Sankey, a BYC student who as of (date) has completed seven of the 10-month residential program. “I used to see them [students] doing physical training and playing; I told myself that I wanted to be like them; if they could do it, so could I.” Sankey’s old days are over. When he was released from juvenile center, he enrolled at BYC. “BYC is for young men willing to make a change in their life,” said Sankey. “I am ready to go back into society and leave behind all the bad things I used to do.” He dreams to join the Belize Coast Guard. BYC is an alternative educational program for young men age 15 to 17 at risk of getting involved in criminal activities or dealing with negative behaviors. BYC was founded in November 2016, when the National Youth Cadet Service Corps was reorganized. The program, modeled after the Louisiana Army National Guard’s (LANG) Youth Challenge Program (YCP), opened its doors in October 2017. BYC falls under the Belize Ministry of Defence and the Belize Ministry of Human Development, Social Transformation and Poverty Alleviation. The Belize Defence Force (BDF) and the Community Rehabilitation Department manage the program. “Our mission is to intervene in and reclaim the lives of at-risk youth to produce young men with the values, skills, education, and self-discipline necessary to succeed as adults,” said BDF Captain Ivan Locario, acting deputy commandant of BYC. “Our end goal is to make productive citizens of the nation.” Changing lives Davin López, a 15-year-old from Seine Bight village, south of Belize, didn’t dream of a better future a year ago. Expelled from high school, he was involved with drugs, street fights, and burglaries. After learning about BYC through a radio advertisement, he applied for the program and got in. López, a BYC student scheduled to graduate in July, aspires to become a chef and is determined to be a good citizen, and help others. “At first, I didn’t want to follow the rules at BYC, but now it’s different. I am self-disciplined and the instructors have helped me a lot,” said López. “If I hadn’t found BYC, I would be dead.” BYC has 40 students from around the country with the opportunity to learn away from the traditional school system. Cadets pick up military values, discipline, teamwork, vocational skills, and academics. The program also provides counselors, social workers, and mentors. “Our work is in the best interest of the young man,” said Cap. Locario. “The structure and discipline that we display every day shows the cadets that it doesn’t matter where they’re from, or how they started, it’s how they finished; the discipline we bring to the table and the stories we relate, allows cadets to realize they can make a difference in their lives.” The program has two phases: residential and post-residential. During the 10-month residential phase, cadets learn about life coping skills—such as anger management and self-esteem—take literacy classes, prepare for exams to seek their high school education, and participate in vocational training, such as agriculture, woodworking, and hospitality. After graduation, cadets go back home to start the 12-month post-residential phase, where they continue their education or join the workforce with the community and mentors’ support. LANG supports the youth program LANG and BDF have a strong partnership since 1996 under the U.S. National Guard’s State Partnership Program. In 36 years, the institutions exchanged training, combined exercises, disaster preparedness, and humanitarian assistance. In 2014, LANG started working with BDF’s youth program, sharing lessons and experiences from their YCP. Established in 1993, YCP targets young men and women age 16 to 18 in a 17-month program. So far 24,025 cadets have graduated. “Our objective with BYC is no different than our Youth Challenge Program in Louisiana: to try to give the youth an opportunity to excel, live their dreams, and contribute to society in a positive manner,” said U.S. Major General Glenn H. Curtis, adjutant general for LANG. “BYC is going to grow. BDF instills a sense of pride, responsibility, and discipline in these young men.” “As a society, whether it is Belize or Louisiana, we help our young men and women to give them an opportunity to succeed and pass it on to the next generation,” concluded Maj. Gen. Curtis.last_img read more

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Preparing for the next system failure

first_img 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » In the movie “The Day After Tomorrow”  the climate gets so severe  that millions of people have  to flee to Mexico in search of warm weather.  I was thinking of this plot line as I drove down to North Carolina for my Niece’s wedding this weekend after spending some time in DC.  You have  to get to Southern Virginia before you see any real signs of Spring.It felt unnatural to be intentionally heading North on Sunday afternoon.    That being said, my wife was getting tired of my mutterings about insurance funds and megabanks so it is time to get blogging again.Last Monday I noticed that the retired Captain Ahab to the credit union’s industry’s Moby Dick was  up to his old  tricks.  With some excellent research Keith Leggett  reported that the NCUA sent a Whit Paper to Congress a couple of years ago seeking legislative authority to create a more complicated and ultimately larger share insurance fund for the credit union system.(http://creditunionwatch.blogspot.com/2015/04/ncua-white-paper-on-reforming-ncusif.html )  CUNA  has provided a link to the document. Maybe it’s because I was viewing all this from a distance, but a   system that ties insurance fund assessments to both the size and complexity of a credit union’s operations makes sense to me…in theory.First let’s be honest and admit that the existing share insurance fund didn’t adequately shelter credit unions from the financial Tsunami. If we didn’t get a loan from the treasury Department to payback the debt of the failed corporates the industry would be an empty shell of itself.last_img read more

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2 New TV Series Examine Long Island Serial Killer Case

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Two new true crime television series airing this month will debut with two-hour season premieres focusing on the unsolved Long Island Serial Killer investigation shortly before the six-year anniversary of the case.People Magazine Investigates, which promises to tell the stories of the families behind some of the nation’s most infamous crime stories, debuts at 9 p.m. Monday, Nov. 7 on Investigation Discovery. The Killing Season, a documentary series that explores possible connections between unsolved serial killer cases nationwide, debuts at 9 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 12 on A&E. The creators of both series say they’ve uncovered new evidence in the cases.“People pays tribute to the victims, and provides their friends and families an opportunity to tell their stories,” said Jess Cagle, the magazine’s editorial director. “This approach distinguishes People’s coverage, as we identify the most compelling local stories and give them a national forum.”The LISK case has drawn national and international media attention ever since the first four women were found dead in the brush on the side of Ocean Parkway in Gilgo Beach in December 2010. When Suffolk County police expanded their search to surrounding beaches over the following year, investigators found the human skeletal remains of four more women, a man in women’s clothing, and a toddler.Only six of the 11 have been identified and were last known to be working as sex workers. Among those identified is Shannan Gilbert, who police were searching for when they discovered the other remains. Police have said they don’t believe Gilbert was murdered, but her family thinks otherwise.Both The Killing Season and People Magazine Investigates are comprised of one-hour weekly episodes. The first two episodes of both series—which will be aired back-to-back for their premieres—focus on the LISK case. The Killing Season runs eight episodes and People Magazine Investigates runs 10.The first two episodes of The Killing Season screened last month at the Hamptons International Film Festival.“The Killing Season takes viewers on a chilling ride through the unknown and is a perfect example of impactful storytelling that drives the cultural conversation,” said Elaine Frontain Bryant, head of programming at A&E.last_img read more

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More first home buyers are investing in this community

first_imgGrishma, her mother, and Pradeep Kharel. Photo: SuppliedYoung couples and families looking to buy their first home have their eyes set on Brentwood Forest at Bellbird Park.With property prices in Brisbane predicted to increase again by more than 5 per cent in 2020 the affordability of housing in the central suburbs of Brisbane may become harder to achieve for first home buyers looking to invest in property.Some buyers have found the solution in the outlying suburbs of Greater Brisbane, where the average home price is currently sitting at $528,000 – around $147,000 less than the median price in the Brisbane Local Government Area.AVID Property Group senior development manager Peter MacLeod said the master-planned community had received more inquiries from couples and families looking to buy their first home.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus12 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market12 hours ago“We are seeing more couples coming to Brentwood Forest in search of the stability that comes with home ownership – they are looking for a place to start and grow their family,” Mr MacLeod said.Grishma and Pradeep Kharel were renting in inner-city Brisbane when they decided the time was right to invest in their own home. They soon realised an inner-city home was not achievable with their budget and started looking into opportunities further away from the Brisbane CBD. “Before buying our home we had been renting less than 15 minutes from the city, but we couldn’t afford to buy a home there,” Ms Kharel said. “We had been looking at several different areas in the area, but Brentwood Forest in Bellbird Park stood out to us.“Brentwood Forest had great utilities and we actually loved the location – it was only half an hour from the city and close to schools, shopping centres and only a seven-minute drive to Springfield Central.”last_img read more

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2 brothers jailed for ‘stabbing’ man

first_imgThe suspects were detained in the lockupcell of the Dingle police station. Charges for frustrated homicide will befiled against them./PN ILOILO City – Two brothers taggedsuspects in a stabbing incident were arrested in Barangay Tabugon, Dingle,Iloilo. Parreño sustained a stab wound on theright hand. He already received treatment. According to the police, the suspectsallegedly attack Parreño after a heated argument ensued between them around 10:30p.m. on Dec. 20. But it was not immediately established what caused thealtercation.center_img They were 28-year-old Steven Ramos and34-year-old Alvin, a police report showed. The Ramos were accused of stabbing RogerParreño, 32, of Barangay Buenavista, Dingle.last_img

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Ronnie McAllister

first_imgMost of you have seen Ronnie McAllister running the streets and roads around Batesville.  The Aurora native and Batesville resident is nearing a running milestone.  When he starts his 2017 road races, he will be 149 races short of 1,000.  Ronnie began this quest in 1982 and hopes to finish it in the next few years.In high school McAllister was a hurdler in track and a cross country runner at South Dearborn.  He credits Coach Mark Wilhelm for giving him the running bug.  They try to run at least 2 races together each season.  Ronnie lists the Popcorn Panic in Valparaiso and the Southeast Indiana racing circuit as 2 of his favorites.  Most of his races are 5 or 10k, but he has run marathons.Ronnie, along with his racing buddy Leo Turchyn, coached together in Batesville from 1999-2011.  A lot of his 851 runs were alongside his long-time friend, Leo.  I consider Ronnie of my good friends since his running days at South Dearborn High School.  I would like to thank Jim Buchberger for a lot of this information.last_img read more

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