Property company celebrates ten years

first_imgL to R: Paul Ladyman, Managing Director and Ashleigh Parkes, lettings assistant. My Homelettings, based in Middlesbrough and managing properties across the Tees Valley, offers managed and non-managed services for landlords.Founder Paul Ladyman, said, “When I set up the business a decade ago, I decided to treat every property we work with as if it’s our own, as I aimed to become one of the most trusted agencies in the area.”“Since then, we have developed through tough times.“We work hard to match the right tenant with the right property – and experienced property specialists support and maintain all of the properties in our portfolio.”“We understand that letting a property, especially for the first time, can be a worrying experience, we also never forget that it’s the client’s most important asset which is why we pride ourselves on providing the best possible service and we look forward to the next ten years.My Homelettings Paul Ladyman Ashleigh Parkes Tees Valley property company June 28, 2019The NegotiatorWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » News » Agencies & People » Property company celebrates ten years previous nextAgencies & PeopleProperty company celebrates ten yearsThe Negotiator28th June 20190226 Viewslast_img read more

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The chain gang – conveyancing under pressure

first_imgHome » Features » The chain gang – conveyancing under pressure previous nextProducts & ServicesThe chain gang – conveyancing under pressureIn the post-lockdown ‘boom’ conveyancers are under massive pressure to deliver, but some are responding better than others, says Richard Reed.Richard Reed30th September 20201 Comment3,892 Views A massive post-lockdown conveyancing logjam is causing headaches for agents as they desperately try to keep sales on track. It’s been caused by the backlog of transactions already in the pipeline running up against the sudden surge in new sales – at a time when many solicitors still have most of their staff furloughed.Experts say many legal firms are reluctant to bring staff back from furlough in case the current boom turns out to be just a bubble and sales head south next year as the country goes into recession.Some believe the current chaos will accelerate moves to use technology to increase visibility in the conveyancing chain – though others point out that however good the technology, the solicitor will always be the weakest link.“It’s a nightmare – it’s been like that for a good few months now,” says Carl Brignell, managing director of Elite Conveyancing.“The volume guys were already stretched at the best of times; now you just can’t get through to any of them. Clients are being passed from pillar to post, and a lot of them don’t know if they are coming or going.“Around May, when they were starting to allow people to move again, we just couldn’t get exchanges and completions through because you couldn’t get hold of people. That hasn’t really stopped.“Demand is such they should be getting people back but they are not, because a lot of these firms have taken a big hit economically, so rightly or wrongly they are trying to save as much money as they can, but that has an impact on the service.”Recruiting to meet demandElite has been hiring lawyers as fast as it can to meet the phenomenal demand. “We put an advert out at the end of March as we thought there would be a lot of good lawyers out there looking for work, and since then we have been absolutely inundated,” says Brignell. “We have taken on four new lawyers in the last six weeks on a consultancy basis – we are constantly recruiting now.”It’s a theme echoed by James Benger, director of Quote Legal, who says pre- Covid issues have been intensified by the lockdown.“It’s created a perfect storm within some law firms – more your old school, high street firms. The majority of them have been very slow to bring people back from furlough so the caseloads for the existing staff have been much too big for them to manage, and that has resulted in frustrations right through the chain.”He explains, “The previous problems with those high street firms is they never proactively chased the client or assisted them, particularly on a sale – when they send out the instruction pack and they have to fill in lists of fixtures and fittings and property information forms, that can be quite daunting for the client, especially if it’s the first time they’ve sold or they haven’t done it for 10 or 20 years.“The client at that point very rarely knows the urgency of getting those forms back, because without that, the draft contract pack won’t go out to the buyer’s solicitors.”Benger thinks some solicitors are “looking after number one”.“What they are not doing is supporting those estate agents who have given them a lots of business for many years. Instead of looking up and saying, ‘We are going to do what we need to do to get people back in to get these transactions to happen’… a lot of them are saying, ‘We will see how this goes and we are not going to be taking the financial hit’.”He believes sales progression tools have limitations because they are never updated in real time – “You might a text or email to say a mortgage offer in but there’s always another question”, he says.“A lot of firms are looking to speed things up but you will always hit a brick wall with certain solicitors. Estate agents need to be more selective about who they work with. Why should we be dictated to by a practice that is 10-20 years out of date when there are law firms that are doing things so much more quickly?“I think this really is a time for agents to reflect – which law firms out there are doing the job best for us and best for our clients?”Benger says agents should work with conveyancers who have established a good track record and steer buyers towards using them, rather than letting them go off and find their own solicitor.InefficienciesDavid Jabbari, CEO at Muve Conveyancing, agrees Covid has created a maelstrom in the property sales pipeline, with new instructions at the firm running 500 per cent over budget in June and July.He says the situation has proven to be a “moment of truth” for conveyancing.“Instructions are going mad but transactions face roadblocks. This is due to blockages still in the system around things like searches, law firms not unfurloughing quickly enough, valuation backlogs and the withdrawal of higher LTV mortgage products.“Traditional firms are struggling to get back up to speed post-Covid due to a lack of access to capital and a consequent inability to scale up. They are short of cash post-Covid, unable to finance any expansion in work in progress, and so many are ‘shutting up shop’ to new work.He points out that Muve, in contrast, is investing in additional sales and lawyer capacity following £1.1m in new investment in April, and has been able to cope with the “massive” increase in instructions.Jabbari does believe technology will increasingly be used to speed up the legal process. “Conveyancing is ripe for great change,” he says. “We have seen some positive, albeit too slow, moves from the Land Registry to move to e-signature for key documents. Covid has shown that conveyancers can work effectively on a virtual basis if they have digitised key information, such as the property information forms, something we did two years ago.”He says firms need to go a lot further, however, and Muve is working on a series of initiatives aimed at shrinking the time from client on-boarding to exchange.Peter Joseph, CEO of The Moving Hub agrees there has been a major problem on the conveyancing front. “I sadly don’t think that our industry has coped well at all with the outbreak,” he says.“Most of the property market is led by a perception that it needs to be face to face; viewings, floor plans, seeing your estate agent and sitting in front of a conveyancing solicitor to handle the legal side. I’m not saying all of this shouldn’t be face to face, but so much can and now should be done online to save time, money and improve efficiency.”Our conveyancing platform not only saves our clients money, but it’s fully transparent in showing our clients exactly what’s happening on their instruction. Peter Joseph CEO, The Moving Hub.He added, “Mortgage advisers are working closer now with agents to bridge that gap between agent and conveyancer and we and others are working on tech to smooth the data sharing between us all which can only help to speed things up.“Our conveyancing platform not only saves our clients money, but it’s fully transparent in showing our clients exactly what’s happening on their instruction but also speeds up the process, which will mean in some cases it will hold a chain together that would otherwise fall apart.”Sales progressorsSales progression tech firms understandably believe technology is the way to speed up the process – and will highlight where logjams are occurring.Jon Horton, product director at Mio, agrees that many conveyancers “weren’t nimble enough to adjust and adapt to the market suddenly opening up and the unexpected influx of work, and they’ve been caught out”.Agents need to view it with a fresh set of eyes and not keep harking back to how they’ve always done it – because that’s why their pipelines are turning over so slowly. Joe Horton, Product Director, Mio.But he says platforms such as Mio offer a completely new way for agents to progress the sales chain. “The reason why people are ringing around is because everything is in a ‘silo’ at the moment.“Agents need to view it with a fresh set of eyes and not keep harking back to how they’ve always done it, because that’s the reason their pipelines are turning over so slowly. None of it is joined up – they are all working in their own little bubbles.”Horton explains that Mio allows agents to build a complete overview of the chain, and how it is progressing, providing the agent on the other side of the transaction is also using the software.“We are starting to use validated data feeds from people like conveyancers and surveyors, feeding into Mio to say we have completed this milestone, or that milestone, and that negates the need for an agent to ring the conveyancer to get an update as to what is happening.”Blockchain game changer?Proptech company Coadjute has taken a leap forward and harnessed the power of blockchain – the software that underpins Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies.Blockchain uses what is known as distributed ledger technology to create a live, secure, continuously updated public record of every transaction in a process. Every time an event occurs – such as a search coming back or an information pack going out – it is automatically recorded in the blockchain via a simple piece of software that is linked in to existing case management software.“What Coadjute is bringing to market is a network that will connect the estate agents, the conveyancers, the brokers, the lenders, the surveyors – all parties,” says CEO Dan Salmons. “The effect of that is that everyone can see in real time when someone else updates their system.”He says the big difference to other sales progression tools is they require everyone to be using the same software. “The difference with Coadjute is the connectivity behind it will connect into the back of all the systems that people are already using and enable them to see what is going on in real time on other people’s systems.”Sohail Rasheed, co-founder of ViewMyChain, agrees change is in the air and says there will be “winners and losers”.“I do think there will be some positive adoption of tech services in the sector and I also think there will be casualties, because the sector will be a different space to what it was before.“There will be an increased amount of process that can be automated – whether it’s in a timescale that people want is another matter.”It seems there will be no immediate relief for agents as far as the current conveyancing logjam is concerned, but as with many other areas of life, Covid – and the government’s reaction to it – has accelerated change that might otherwise have taken years to unfold.https://www.elite-conveyancing.com/https://quotelegal.co.uk/https://www.muve.me.uk/https://www.themovinghub.co.uk/https://mio.co.uk/https://www.coadjute.com/https://viewmychain.com/home house chains The Moving Hub Sohail Rasheed Joe Horton Peter Joseph MIO Richard Reed blockchain solicitors conveyancers conveyancing ViewMyChain September 30, 2020Jenny van BredaOne commentMike Stainsby, Property Searches Direct Ltd Property Searches Direct Ltd 5th October 2020 at 12:39 pmInteresting article but there seems, as always, to be a lot of mud slinging! Given the perfect storm brewing for all agents sales pipelines it has become increasingly evident that all stakeholders need to work harder to smooth things over between the warring factions. Considering Agents and Conveyancers ultimately want the same thing – to get people moving, why the tension?We are all on countdown, a normal Christmas is very unlikely as is moving into a new home by then. Local Authorities are inundated with Search requests, Conveyancers are questioning taking on more cases than they can cope with and the end of the SDLT holiday is clearly visible in the distance. We all need to manage home movers expectations and make some changes to help mitigate the problems that we are seeing.At Property Searches Direct we recommend home-movers get legally prepared as soon as they can. Sellers can start to find their FENSA certificate, boiler maintenance schedule, fill in a SPIF and FFQ and order a Local Search and Water report as soon as they put their property on the market. Buyers can use our FREE Hazard Checker to see if the property is built on contaminated land, has historic flooding issues etc and then order the appropriate Search pack. If a queue is getting longer and longer you should join it as soon as possible, hoping it gets better is a pipe dream and is not going to happen.visit us at https://www.propertysearchesdirect.co.uk/hazard-checkerLog in to ReplyWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Onwards and upwards28th April 2021 The surge in mergers26th April 2021 Client accounting firm honoured with Queen’s Award29th April 2021last_img read more

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Support Gov. Murphy’s pre-K expansion

first_imgROBERT B. KNAPP To the Editor:This writer recalls in approximately 1965 under the Johnson Administration the opening of the first Head Start preschools in Jersey City. This most worthy program was responsible for giving children an introduction to school life at an early age, and many of the great leaders today participated in this educational endeavor.In Gov. Phil Murphy’s budget message he included $83 million dollars for the expansion of the pre-K programs throughout New Jersey. He is seeking to add communities to this program, and this certainly demonstrates the governor’s commitment for thousands of our three- and four-year olds to participate. In the past administration there had been mention of the expansion of the program, but no action in this area. The governor noted that studies certainly indicate that a pre-K experience for a child builds a strong foundation for that child’s educational future.When this writer attended public grammar school in Jersey City in the 1950s there was no pre-K, and in many cases even kindergarten did not provide enough educational exercises. Times have changed, and children complete academic work in kindergarten today, thereby making the pre-K experience a necessity.Let us petition our state legislators to stand behind Gov. Murphy and give all children in New Jersey a head start in their education with the pre-K activities.last_img read more

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Our deli bread

first_imgWastage of unsold products can be a problem with bread, and even more so with higher-cost items, such as pies and pastries. But in the deli trade, it can mean the difference between being in business and out of it.Stocking potentially dozens of high-cost lines, each of which has a short shelf-life (but different sell-by dates), is a daily jaunt through a financial minefield. As Shirley Cobley, co-owner of the Bakery & Delicatessen in Woodhall Spa, Lincolnshire, puts it: “We have to be very careful on rotation.”Of the shop she calls her “mini-Harrods”, she adds: “It’s a good business, but it’s stressful. A lot of that stress comes from the fact that you cannot allow any waste. You have to keep watching your stock.”Recently, these and other strains even led to a falling-out with her business partner. And, in the 21 years she has run the business, she reckons she has had just four holidays.Over in Worcestershire at the Ombersley Bakery & Deli, co-owner Diane Seivewright agrees that wastage is a constant concern. “You have to keep an eye on what you’re selling all the time,” she says. “Otherwise, what you’re throwing away is your profit.”As she points out, most delis will factor potential waste into their margins (see panel). Increasingly, even locally-produced lines, such as cheeses and bacon, can be supplied portioned and pre-packed, says Seivewright. This means that shelf-life is longer, and the mark-up might be less. With some products such as sausages, she says, chilled storage simply does not make sense for her business, and they are supplied frozen.She has one prime piece of advice for would-be doyens of the deli: “If you have a small kitchen or preparation area that has been approved by Health & Safety, you can make use of many of your leftovers in soups and so forth.”BB columnist Jo Fairley makes the same point. Better-known as one of the founders of the Green & Blacks chocolate brand, she took on the co-ownership of Judges Bakery in Hastings in 2005. Judges stocks local fresh produce, and anything that is not sold is likely to end up in a soup. Similarly, she says, any smoked salmon reaching its sell-by date becomes the filling in a sandwich. Other owners offer free tastings or sell off products at cost price.When Fairley bought Judges, it was a bakery only. “The numbers didn’t add up, and we realised that the only way to make it work was to turn it into a ’one-stop-shop’,” she says. “Organic is the given. All food has to be sustainably produced.” It is also all sourced from within 15 miles.The shop has some 40 different suppliers altogether. “It was time-consuming and labour-intensive to begin with, but people do respond to the local message,” she explains.Given concerns about wastage, Seivewright at Ombersley says her philosophy with suppliers of short shelf-life items is “little and often”. This way, using local suppliers can yield two benefits. It plays to growing consumer awareness of – and preference for – local products, but also allows more frequent and precise regulation of stock. Some suppliers may stipulate minimum order values such as £50, she adds, although many locals will waive that.Backhaus developmentGerd Kusche owns the Backhaus deli and bakery in Ham, south-west London. Although he has a history in bakery-related new product development, international consultancy and entrepreneurship, in this case the deli came first. Later, he opened the craft bakery two shops away.The area’s substantial expat German population provides the backbone of his business. On the deli side, this includes some 100 different sausages, which will keep for up to 28 days, around 40 cheeses and up to 700 popular grocery items.Surprisingly, supply lines to Germany are not complex. “In fact, we have a single merchant who provides us with all the products we need,” he says. “One of the big advantages is that most of our products are not available elsewhere in the UK – or else are prohibitively expensive.”In this business, health and safety concerns are never very far away, and food safety training for staff is important. But even where part-time staff are trained and well-intentioned, the owners will inevitably find themselves in a state of eternal vigilance.”You always need someone on-site who will take responsibility,” says Seivewright at Ombersley. “I used to constantly be double-checking that certain things had been done, such as dates written down for fresh pâté.”Fairley at Judges takes all of this in her stride. “We have temperature checks three times a day and a daily date check,” she says. “Any short-dated stock gets noted down.”In terms of inventory management, she advises would-be deli-owners to invest in a good electronic point-of-sale (EPOS) analysis system. “Ours was quite an investment, but you know what, you’re selling hour-by-hour,” she says.In the end, whatever the benefits of spreading the risk and the opportunities with deli lines, they are no guarantee of profits – or even turnover. Fairley confesses: “Grocery sales generally are in freefall.” She puts this down to customers throwing less food away. Or could they be shopping around more?Whatever the reason, it has had a dramatic effect on her business. “We’re looking at temporarily closing down the back of the shop and having just our 500 best-selling lines at the front,” she says.So the verdict seems to be, if you have clear ideas about stock management and margins, a strong pool of local suppliers and possibly a specialist or ethnic angle, then an in-store deli could be the break or extension you are looking for. Otherwise, there are always other less risky options, such as launching a new chocolate brand…—-=== What are the margins? ===Exceptionally, perhaps, Judges in Hastings claims to make proportionally less on deli products than on baked goods. “If I were making the margins on everything that I’m making on bread, I’d be a happy bunny,” says co-owner Jo Fairley. Instead, she says, non-bakery products are marked up 33-35%.At Backhaus in London, the relationship is reversed, with bakery pulling in 40-50% of net profit, says owner Gerd Kusche. Margins on the wide range of imported German deli products range from 60% to a whopping 120% net profit, he claims.Meanwhile, at the Ombersley Bakery & Deli in Worcestershire, co-owner Diane Seivewright aims for margins in the 40-45% range, and will go no lower than 35%. “But 65% or even 80% margins are quite usual for deli businesses,” she says. “Some even go as high as 100%, because you end up wasting the food.”—-=== Case study: Huntley’s ===Farmer Eddie Cowpe opened his farm shop, Huntley’s of Samlesbury, in response to the foot-and-mouth crisis of 2001 and has developed it into a full-blown deli and a destination attraction. A bakery was built in March 2008 and, with former Greenhalgh’s employee and one-time BB Young Baker of the Year Mark Hanson at the helm, the bakery is already turning over £3.5k a week – around a 10th of the deli’s sales – plus an extra £1.5k sold through the adjoining restaurant.Hanson uses back-to-basics methods, including 48-hour fermented doughs. Cowpe says: “We cannot make enough bread at the moment – it’s taking off. Everything is done traditionally and Mark really knows what he’s doing.”The range has developed to include pies, cakes and pastries and the next step will be to wholesale the bakery. “We’re finding we can compete with the supermarkets,” says Cowpe.last_img read more

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Five Alarm Funk Shares Behind-The-Scenes Video Making Their Upcoming Album [Premiere]

first_imgEight piece groove rockers Five Alarm Funk are one of the most exciting bands on the Vancouver scene, bringing their uniquely exciting sound to venues all across the continent! Rooted in the funk sound, the band merges influences from Latin music, progressive rock, ska, and more to make something that’s totally their own. But it all comes together with the tight-laced grooves that can only be found in funky, groovy music.The band is set to release their sixth studio album, Sweat, on March 3rd. If it’s anything like their previous five releases, our hopes are particularly high. The band has been nominated for awards on some of their latest albums, all fueled by their groove heavy approach. “Sweat is the culmination of over a decade of writing and playing music together,” says drummer/vocalist Tayo Branston. “It’s by far the hottest, funkiest work we have ever created!”To get you excited for the new release, we’ve teamed up with Five Alarm Funk to share their new behind the scenes video making the new album, set to the music of new song “DDPP.” “‘DDPP’ is a throwback to the 1980’s break dance battle scene,” says Branston. “The goal was to create an up-tempo break beat that had the attributes of an early hip hop dance track, but in a vibe that blended Five Alarm Funk’s powerful, relentless sound.”You can check out the new behind-the-scenes video for Sweat, posted below.Pre-orders for the new album and all information about the band can be found on their official website! Don’t miss an opportunity to catch this exciting crew at a venue near you.[Cover photo via Maggie MacPherson]last_img read more

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From the islands to the bayous

first_img <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRuPbqnL4Hg” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/oRuPbqnL4Hg/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> It was 1997 in the Canary Islands and Thenesoya V. Martín De la Nuez, then 18, was struck by the voice of a Louisiana man singing a Creole version of a Spanish poem.“I was so moved, I cried. Here was an American, a U.S. citizen — and he was speaking like us, like Canary Islanders,” Martín says.Delacroix Highway, La.The emotional connection sent her on a mission to chronicle the fading culture of the descendants of Canary Islanders who settled in Spanish Louisiana in the 18th century.Her research gained urgency in 2005 when news reports of Canarians rocked by the destruction of Hurricane Katrina compelled her to reach out to members of the diaspora community and meet them face-to-face.Now a Ph.D. candidate at Harvard’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS) and a teaching fellow in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, Martín’s research has bloomed into a sprawling cultural documentary project, traveling photo exhibit, and book.Wimpy Serigne, St. Bernard Parish, La.The book will incorporate more than 100 interviews and 8,000 photographs collected during four years of fieldwork with her husband, photojournalist Aníbal Martel, which help make up the Cislanderus project. The name is a sort of acronym of Canary Islanders and U.S. that also intends “us” to emphasize the commonalities.Martín said the book “will be a story of cultural survival, investigating how the complex Canarian cultural legacy has survived or, in most cases, been reinvented in a complicated process of cultural nostalgia.”Top: Thenesoya Martin and Aníbal Martel exhibit their work at a Canary Islands museum. Above, clockwise from top left, Martin conducts fieldwork, reading family records with a Canary Islands descendant in San Antonio, Texas; interviewing Tini Perez of St. Bernard Parish, La., who retains a vestigial Spanish from the Islands; meeting with a Baton Rouge, La., Canarian; and researching 18th century church records in Louisiana.“I had been reading for years, but I was always missing something,” she said. “The faces of people. Where are they? Who are they? Do they seem like Canary Islanders right now?“I didn’t have any idea of how they looked, how they dressed, where they lived or what they did. I wanted to be there. I wanted to understand how their cultural legacy developed over three centuries. I wanted to understand how successive waves of immigration and migration from the Spanish peninsula and the Caribbean, as well as marriages into the Cajun community, shaped and affected that legacy.”Joseph and Selena Gonzalez, Yscloskey, St. Bernard Parish, La.The couple began their investigations in Delacroix Island, Shell Beach, and Reggio, unincorporated communities in St. Bernard Parish, New Orleans, then followed a complicated map of Canary Island descendants scattered throughout Louisiana, including around Baton Rouge and the lower Mississippi River. Today they have expanded their fieldwork to San Antonio, Texas.“We want to document the present,” Martín said. “It’s the book I looked for at the beginning, but it didn’t exist. So I am writing it.”Dot Benge, above, and Jerry Alfonso, top, of St. Bernard Parish, La.A Canarian from Baton Rouge, La.Sign documenting Canarian immigrants’ boats, St. Bernard, La.Barataria, one of the four Canarian settlements in Louisiana.Sunset in the bayous beyond the retaining wall, South New Orleans.Henry Jr. Rodriguez, St. Bernard Parish, La.In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, a sunken boat in Dalacroix Island, South New Orleans, above, and an elevated home in Hopedale, La., below.Felice Lopez Melerine, St. Bernard, La.Thomas Gonzales, Delacroix Island, La.Canarian cemetery, St. Bernard, La.Bayou, Hopedale, La.Pier and pelicans, Hopedale, St. Bernard Parish, La.Florisant Highway, South New Orleans.Henry Martinez and his grandson Kim fish the bayous.Bayou, Shell Beach, La.Thenesoya Martin in San Antonio, Texas.Erwinville, La.last_img read more

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Landscape Updates.

first_imgLandscape professionals must know a mind-boggling array of things to keep the world around us pretty. To help them stay abreast, the University of Georgia and other institutions will offer regional updates Oct. 9 in Dunwoody, Ga., and Oct. 17 in Augusta, Ga.While the programs aren’t exactly alike, each begins at 8 a.m. and ends at 3:30 p.m. Each has a session on the Georgia Certified Landscape Professional program.Each has updates on such topics as weed, insect and disease control and winter annuals for high-impact color. And each will close with an outdoor, hands-on activity.Where to GoThe Dunwoody program will be in building C, room 1100, at Georgia Perimeter College. A map to the Dunwoody campus is on the college’s Web site.The Augusta program is in the Medical College of Georgia Alumni Center on 15th Street. The college’s Web site has a campus map.The $20 fee covers lunch and breaks. Sign up by Oct. 2 for Dunwoody and Oct. 10 for Augusta. For more information, call (706) 542-2861.last_img read more

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A Long Distance Runner Selects his Go-To Gear

first_imgErick White wasn’t always a long-distance runner. The 23-year-old Philadelphia native grew up playing soccer and running the 800 on his school’s track team, but after moving to Atlanta in August, he discovered his love (and talent) for running distance. This year, White won the StumpJump 15K, a fast, technical trail race on Lookout Mountain outside of Chattanooga, and placed fourth overall at the Georgia Marathon. It was White’s first time running a marathon, and the finish earned him the chance to compete in the Boston Marathon in the fall. The StumpJump win was just as surprising to White. “I hadn’t raced on trails in years, and then it was all singletrack so there’s no room to maneuver,” White says. “The terrain was so different than most races—rocky, trails that aren’t well defined. Honestly, I’m surprised I didn’t get lost.”White, who races for Front Runners, Atlanta’s LGBT running club, is still getting used to running in the Southern heat. But he’s enjoying exploring Atlanta’s surprisingly robust trail scene. “Running is such a great way to relieve stress. It’s so meditative, and you can always find a good group of people to run with.”We asked White to detail the gear he relies on during his runs. Here’s his minimalist take on running gear.Mizuno Wave Rider 20 ($120)I have to run in these. I have a light pronation, and these provide good stability. They’re lightweight, but really soft. And they make a waterproof version now.Feeture Elite Merino ($16.99)I like the slim, snug feel of these socks, and they don’t rub or chafe on my ankle. There’s no toe seam, and the Merino wool wicks pretty well.Columbia Montrail Caldarado II ($120)A featherweight 10.4 ounces, these nimble trail shoes are quick and responsive on technical terrain. Completely redesigned, the Caldarado II features an easy-fit, fully integrated tongue and a seamless toe cap. Built for speed on rugged trails, these shoes offer a fun, fast, fluid ride.Under Armour No Breaks ($60)I’m always looking to cut weight, so I usually run without a shirt, and I prefer wearing split shirts. In the winter, I run warm and I can handle the cold pretty well. But if it’s really cold, I make sure I have tights on my legs to keep them warm. I like Under Armour No Breaks tights. These have built-in briefs, a key pocket and just enough compression in the fabric.Showers Pass Crosspoint Hardshell Gloves ($95)These are the gloves you want for winter adventure in the mountains. Waterproof, rugged, and durable, they can handle rip-roaring snowsports action or burly winter summits. Yet they are also flexible and maneuverable, providing outstanding dexterity. Most importantly, they keep digits toasty warm even on frigid nights in the backcountry.AfterShokz Titanium Trekz Headphones ($130)Lightweight and sweatproof, these wireless bluetooth headphones use bone conduction technology and an open-ear design to provide stereo sound and crystal clear communication while still allowing you to hear your surroundings safely.Electric Knoxville XL-S ($120)These lightweight, full-coverage frames are built for performance. Polarized polycarbonate lenses protect from UV and blue light, and the scratch-resistant, hydrophobic lens coatings hold up well on rugged backcountry outings.The Marathon Stick ($31.95)I always bring The Stick to roll out my legs before and after the run. I think it helps with recovery after a long run.Gel Blocks ($2.79)Obviously, food is important on longer runs. I like those Clif Gel Blocks. I can manage to keep a few of them in my shorts while I’m running. Sometimes I keep it simple with oranges and bananas too, for the electrolytes. Those Sport Beans do well too. They’re quick and easy and I can get them down without too much effort.last_img read more

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Belize Provides Educational Alternative for the Youth

first_imgBy Geraldine Cook/ Diálogo May 10, 2019 Through the window of the juvenile detention center, Delrick Sankey watched as students executed military drills at the Belize Youth Challenge Program (BYC) across the street, and wished to be among them. He was 14 years old and serving a nine-month sentence in Belize City. “I was an at-risk youth. I didn’t have self-esteem and didn’t know what to do with my life,” said Sankey, a BYC student who as of (date) has completed seven of the 10-month residential program. “I used to see them [students] doing physical training and playing; I told myself that I wanted to be like them; if they could do it, so could I.” Sankey’s old days are over. When he was released from juvenile center, he enrolled at BYC. “BYC is for young men willing to make a change in their life,” said Sankey. “I am ready to go back into society and leave behind all the bad things I used to do.” He dreams to join the Belize Coast Guard. BYC is an alternative educational program for young men age 15 to 17 at risk of getting involved in criminal activities or dealing with negative behaviors. BYC was founded in November 2016, when the National Youth Cadet Service Corps was reorganized. The program, modeled after the Louisiana Army National Guard’s (LANG) Youth Challenge Program (YCP), opened its doors in October 2017. BYC falls under the Belize Ministry of Defence and the Belize Ministry of Human Development, Social Transformation and Poverty Alleviation. The Belize Defence Force (BDF) and the Community Rehabilitation Department manage the program. “Our mission is to intervene in and reclaim the lives of at-risk youth to produce young men with the values, skills, education, and self-discipline necessary to succeed as adults,” said BDF Captain Ivan Locario, acting deputy commandant of BYC. “Our end goal is to make productive citizens of the nation.” Changing lives Davin López, a 15-year-old from Seine Bight village, south of Belize, didn’t dream of a better future a year ago. Expelled from high school, he was involved with drugs, street fights, and burglaries. After learning about BYC through a radio advertisement, he applied for the program and got in. López, a BYC student scheduled to graduate in July, aspires to become a chef and is determined to be a good citizen, and help others. “At first, I didn’t want to follow the rules at BYC, but now it’s different. I am self-disciplined and the instructors have helped me a lot,” said López. “If I hadn’t found BYC, I would be dead.” BYC has 40 students from around the country with the opportunity to learn away from the traditional school system. Cadets pick up military values, discipline, teamwork, vocational skills, and academics. The program also provides counselors, social workers, and mentors. “Our work is in the best interest of the young man,” said Cap. Locario. “The structure and discipline that we display every day shows the cadets that it doesn’t matter where they’re from, or how they started, it’s how they finished; the discipline we bring to the table and the stories we relate, allows cadets to realize they can make a difference in their lives.” The program has two phases: residential and post-residential. During the 10-month residential phase, cadets learn about life coping skills—such as anger management and self-esteem—take literacy classes, prepare for exams to seek their high school education, and participate in vocational training, such as agriculture, woodworking, and hospitality. After graduation, cadets go back home to start the 12-month post-residential phase, where they continue their education or join the workforce with the community and mentors’ support. LANG supports the youth program LANG and BDF have a strong partnership since 1996 under the U.S. National Guard’s State Partnership Program. In 36 years, the institutions exchanged training, combined exercises, disaster preparedness, and humanitarian assistance. In 2014, LANG started working with BDF’s youth program, sharing lessons and experiences from their YCP. Established in 1993, YCP targets young men and women age 16 to 18 in a 17-month program. So far 24,025 cadets have graduated. “Our objective with BYC is no different than our Youth Challenge Program in Louisiana: to try to give the youth an opportunity to excel, live their dreams, and contribute to society in a positive manner,” said U.S. Major General Glenn H. Curtis, adjutant general for LANG. “BYC is going to grow. BDF instills a sense of pride, responsibility, and discipline in these young men.” “As a society, whether it is Belize or Louisiana, we help our young men and women to give them an opportunity to succeed and pass it on to the next generation,” concluded Maj. Gen. Curtis.last_img read more

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Preparing for the next system failure

first_img 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » In the movie “The Day After Tomorrow”  the climate gets so severe  that millions of people have  to flee to Mexico in search of warm weather.  I was thinking of this plot line as I drove down to North Carolina for my Niece’s wedding this weekend after spending some time in DC.  You have  to get to Southern Virginia before you see any real signs of Spring.It felt unnatural to be intentionally heading North on Sunday afternoon.    That being said, my wife was getting tired of my mutterings about insurance funds and megabanks so it is time to get blogging again.Last Monday I noticed that the retired Captain Ahab to the credit union’s industry’s Moby Dick was  up to his old  tricks.  With some excellent research Keith Leggett  reported that the NCUA sent a Whit Paper to Congress a couple of years ago seeking legislative authority to create a more complicated and ultimately larger share insurance fund for the credit union system.(http://creditunionwatch.blogspot.com/2015/04/ncua-white-paper-on-reforming-ncusif.html )  CUNA  has provided a link to the document. Maybe it’s because I was viewing all this from a distance, but a   system that ties insurance fund assessments to both the size and complexity of a credit union’s operations makes sense to me…in theory.First let’s be honest and admit that the existing share insurance fund didn’t adequately shelter credit unions from the financial Tsunami. If we didn’t get a loan from the treasury Department to payback the debt of the failed corporates the industry would be an empty shell of itself.last_img read more

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