BIG Something Plays Cover-Heavy Set Honoring Seven Musicians Lost In The Last Year [Full Audio]

first_imgA little over a week ago, BIG Something descended on Mebane, NC for their annual The BIG What? Festival. The up and coming jam rockers always know how to throw a good time, and this year was no exception. The band not only hosted great musicians like The Werks, Turkuaz, Zach Deputy, Pigeons Playing Ping Pong, and more, but they also brought a number of great performances to their own festival. The crowd could not have been happier!Among the many sets performed was a particularly moving Saturday night performance, where the band took a moment to honor a number of the musicians lost during the last year. The end of 2015 into 2016 has been a tough time for the music community, and BIG Something played the music of Prince, Merl Haggard, Lemmy Kilmister, Phife Dawg, Maurice White, David Bowie, and Bernie Worrell in their first set as a tribute to all of them. All of the covers, except Bowie’s “Fame,” were debuts for BIG Something.Thanks to taper Marty Loving, we can listen to the full performance below. There’s also a full setlist from the show printed below, provided by BIG Something’s Nick MacDaniels. Enjoy.Setlist: BIG Something at The BIG What? Festival, Mebane, NC – 7/23/16Sirens >Let’s Go Crazy* (Prince)My Volcano >I think I’ll Just Stay Here And Drink* (Merle Haggard)Grey MatterAce of Spades* (Motorhead)WavesElectric Relaxation* (Tribe Called Quest)Song for UsShining Star* (Earth Wind and Fire)A Simple Vision Fame (David Bowie)Flashlight*^ (Parliament) In the Middle >Untitled** >Love GeneratorVibrations Al Al Jam***It Comes Around >EWI 4000Passenger >TumbleweedThe Curse of Julia BrownAmanda Lynn^^E1: What Is Love* (Haddaway) >Megalodon^^E2: The Devil Went Down to Georgia^^ (Charlie Daniels Band)Wake Up (Rage Against The Machine)Notes:1st set featured a tribute to musical icons Prince, Merle Haggard, Lemme, Phife Dawg, Maurice White, David Bowie, and Bernie Worrell who all passed away within the last year. Photos of each artist appeared on the visual screen throughout the set* first time played^ w/ Spiritual Rez members Quinn Carson (Trombone) & Mohamed Araki (Keytar)** foundation for a new unfinished song still in progress*** Improv Jam w/ Al Al Ingram (Yo Mama’s Big Fat Booty Band) on bass^^ w/ Dani Jaye (Come Back Alice) on violin[Cover photo via Roger Gupta]last_img read more

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Help This Wheelchair-Confined Music Lover Continue His Passion For Travel

first_imgYou may recognize Drew Soule from his concert-going adventures throughout the Midwest. Drew, like the rest of us, loves to travel and see music; but unlike most of us, is physically unable to do so without extreme assistance. Drew is confined to a powerchair as a result of his spinal muscular atrophy. This rare genetic disease involves the loss of neuron cells in the spinal cord, resulting in the lack of muscular growth. The only way for him to pursue his passion for concert-going is through the aid of his 2005 wheelchair-accessible Chrysler Town and Country minivan, which is nearly extinct. Drew desperately needs a new car, and you can help him by donating right here.The 23-year-old St. Charles, IL native discovered his love for music and festivals after traveling cross country during his teenage years with the Muscular Dystrophy Association, a national group raising awareness for muscular dystrophy and atrophy and other neuromuscular diseases. This taste of wanderlust gave him the courage to travel beyond speaking tours and to make moves based on his passion for music and shared community.“Being able to travel for music allows me to immerse myself in other cultures, see new and unfamiliar land, and most importantly network with other humans,” Drew tells us. “By traveling, I am able to meet many people who are also inspired and motivated by the music that makes us dance. There’s something about shared musical experiences that unites us and connects people of vastly different backgrounds and we look past our differences and see each other for what we really are, human.”With these hardships, Soule is still as motivated as ever. He hopes to go to grad school and get into a human resources program, with the ultimate goal of working HR in a corporate setting on the west coast. However, his disabilities make it impossible for Soule to fly, given his powerchair and physical demands, making the application process that much more difficult to succeed in.In an interview with the Chicago Tribune, he explains, “For me, to go anywhere, I have to plan on driving,” explains Soule. “That kind of puts the dependability factor on the vehicle extremely high.”Beyond these realistic needs, like visiting his parents from school at the University of Illinois, where he majors in political science and minors in sociology and environmental studies, Soule depends on his current vehicle to do just about everything. Beyond a mode of transportation, this car is a vehicle to his freedom.Soule’s favorite artists are STS9, the String Cheese Incident, GRiZ, Lettuce, and Bassnectar, and he’s attended festivals like Wakarusa, Summer Camp, and Electric Forest. Understandably, the powerchair-confined young man says that these musical interactions are a boost in confidence that drive him to keep on going, show after show.“For me, traveling has helped me realize that no matter what I want to do in life, if I work at it, I know that I can make it happen, and I know I can do it,” he explains. “Before I started traveling, I know I wasn’t confident enough in setting out what I wanted to do.” Now, his goal is more clear than ever and there’s a chance for us to help.Donate Here to help Drew Soule reach his goal to buy a new wheelchair-accessible minivan.Road Life is a breeding environment for new experiences, and therefore, opportunities for a person to grow. Every element feeds into an adventurous merry-go-round of whimsical decisions and life lessons that, in the end, become cornerstones of your very own character. Read more about why you should always travel to go see music here.Here are some photos of Drew with some of his favorite artists and friends he’s made along the journey:last_img read more

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Watch The Heavy Pets Trade Out Band Members With Brothers Gow One-By-One During This Awesome Band Transition

first_imgThe Heavy Pets and Brothers Gow just wrapped their combined two-week tour of the West coast, which hit eleven cities from San Deigo to Seattle in twelve days. Across the eleven nights, the performance at The Domino Room in Bend, OR, on January 20th stands out as a tour highlight. To transition from The Heavy Pets’ set to Brothers Gow, both bands coordinated an epic transition, which involved members of Brothers Gow coming out and switching with individual members of The Heavy Pets one at a time until the full line-up of Brothers Gow was on stage and ready to shred. Not holding anything back once their full band was on-stage, Brothers Gow then busted out “Squirrel Jam,” a track which hasn’t been seen live in over three years.You can check out video of the transition between the two bands and Brother Gow’s “Squirrel Jam” below, courtesy of Brothers Gow.If you like what you see, you can catch more of Brothers Gow as support for the West-Coast leg of The Werks’ recently announced tour, dates for which can be found below. Tickets are available via Brothers Gow’s website.last_img read more

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Self-assembly as a guide

first_imgImagine gently shaking a box of Lego building blocks, and then looking inside to find a series of complete structures.Self-assembly doesn’t happen in the playroom, but Vinothan Manoharan, an assistant professor of chemical engineering and physics at Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), wants to make it happen in the laboratory to treat life-threatening diseases or manufacture useful objects.“It would be nice to make interesting stuff out of it,” Manoharan said. “It may also be useful to prevent self-assembly in diseases where it matters — and there are lots of diseases, like HIV, where it matters.”Manoharan explained the physics of self-assembly and its huge potential for the world of biology in a lecture — “The New Science of Self-Assembly: From Living Things to New Technology” — Friday night at the Science Center.The hourlong talk was aimed at the nonscientist and came with a humorous series of disclaimers that “everything was my own opinion” and not that of his colleagues, that there was a “lot of speculation,” and that “any resemblance to established theories was coincidental.”Self-assembly, Manoharan explained, is when particles interact with one another and spontaneously arrange themselves into organized structures.This happens in nature. Proteins self-assemble. So do viruses less lethal than HIV. Scientists such as Manoharan hope that by learning how self-assembly works they can stop deadly viruses in their tracks.But Manoharan said that despite years of research his team is nowhere near copying the process.“Nature is doing something we don’t and that is learned through billions of years of evolution,” Manoharan said. “We haven????t been doing it nearly that long.”Indeed, Manoharan has only been at it 15 years.His quest began accidentally in Santa Barbara, where his doctoral adviser at the University of California introduced the topic that is now his passion, asking him to create an opal from household paint.Paint is made up of colloidal particles. So is milk, for that matter. The particles are tiny — 1,000 nanometers. Manoharan said if a colloidal particle were a tennis ball, a person would be the size of the Greater Boston area.Under a microscope, they look like fat droplets and move in random directions — Brownian motion. That random motion is how self-assembly occurs, Manoharan said. Controlling that is key.What got him wondering about self-assembly as a way of making things was thinking about the way cellphones are made. The chips inside are about 30 nm in size. As they get even tinier, sprawling factories have to be built to manufacture microscopic silicone chips. That seemed silly.“Wouldn’t it be great if you could take some silicone and put it into a beaker and shake it for a while and it spontaneously forms a microchip,” Manoharan said. “It seems crazy but that’s what self-assembly means to me.”After arriving at Harvard seven years ago, Manoharan began working on the problem.A significant part of it was: Particles left alone crystallize, but they make mistakes and land in the wrong spot.The trick is getting entropy to work for them. Entropy is a measure of disorder — the higher entropy, the more likely something will be ordered.His team tried to introduce energy to increase entropy. Manoharan illustrated this by attaching Velcro (representing energy) to orange and yellow ping-pong balls in a clear box containing white balls and shaking it. The orange and yellow balls attached.Manoharan’s team also has shown that polytetrahedrons have far greater vibrational entropy — 24 times more — than octahedrons. Again, this sheds light on how to make things stick.“If you control the interactions, so you control which particles stick, you can beat entropy and get them to form,” Manoharan said. “We’ve yet to do this.”Right now, HIV is treated with medicine that interferes with the virus’ mutations. But that requires multiple rounds of drugs switched rapidly to stay ahead with the mutations. If scientists could unlock self-assembly, Manoharan said, they could get ahead of HIV without drugs.“If we understand it, we can treat HIV and get to the mutations,” Manoharan said.last_img read more

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Capturing the good times

first_img The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. Throughout the year, the Gazette’s staff photographers take thousands of photos. They selected their favorites from 2019 and discussed why they left such an impact.,Taking on two doctoral programs — while pregnant with twins Talia Gillis was so lovely and agreed to be photographed at nine months pregnant … with twins. She was also juggling two doctoral programs and a toddler. The plan was to publish before the babies were born, but things happened fast and we were invited over to meet her husband and see these beautiful newborns.She received a lot of heartwarming notes from other Harvard moms — the support network at Harvard is amazing. I was happy to be able to share this story with our audience. Hoping to follow up!— Rose Lincoln,Harvard officer recreates photo with student taken 15 years agoHarvard University Police Officer Charles “Chuck” Marren met with first-year student Crystal Wang 15 years after he was photographed holding her during her first visit to Harvard when she was a toddler. We orchestrated a reunion and it was such a touching moment; Crystal was so thoughtful, bringing a copy of the original photo from 2004 and a handwritten letter, and Chuck was visibly moved. We started with a portrait of the two together just as they had been 15 years before, and then Crystal hopped onto Chuck’s Harley Davidson, and this sweet lighthearted moment transpired.— Stephanie Mitchell,A study in studyingIn Harvard Yard, Ben Zeisberg ’23 studies near Holworthy Hall. I enjoy finding situations where formal visual elements are a tribute to the themes and subjects found in the tradition of modern art. Here, I saw sharp autumn light stretching across a rainbow of Common Spaces chairs while looming trees cast deep shadows. As the student concentrates on his research, a dog pulls away from his leash in the background.— Kris Snibbe,Harvard grad sprints to finish, breaking NCAA record along the wayI photographed Crimson track star Gabby Thomas for one of the Gazette’s senior Commencement profiles last spring. The previous year Thomas had become the first NCAA sprint champion in Ivy League history, setting a new national collegiate record in the 200 meters. She forsook her senior year of eligibility to turn professional, signing a contract with New Balance.I initially thought I might photograph Gabby at the outdoor track at dusk, so I could get her with a setting sun. But the weather was cold, with light rain falling, so we moved indoors. I noticed a large “H” and the words “Harvard Track and Field” on the back wall and decided that would be my background. Ideally, I would capture her running between the two, so they both would be visible I also knew I wanted to shoot her at a slow shutter speed, combined with the studio flash, to produce an effect known as “ghosting.”I warned Gabby this process was a lot of repetition, with several criteria necessary to get the photo I wanted. Finally, after at least 30 takes, and with Gabby getting a full workout, we had our picture. It was definitely a team effort!— Jon Chase,Schuyler Bailar races toward his authentic selfTransgender swimmer Schuyler Bailar ’19 came to Harvard recruited for the women’s team and became a member of the men’s team. He’s a fierce advocate for transgender people and rights. We worked together to get this powerful image of him. I’m proud to be part of his cause in this small way.— Rose Lincoln,William Kaelin wins Nobel Prize in physiology or medicineEvery year, we watch the Nobel Prize week for any winners with a connection to Harvard, and first thing Monday at 5:30 a.m., William G. Kaelin Jr., the Sidney Farber Professor of Medicine at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, was announced as one of three winners of the 2019 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine. As soon as I heard his name, I raced to Kaelin’s home in Boston and photographed him. After I took his portrait, he began fielding calls from the media and stepped into his living room. I enjoyed this solitary moment, with the lights not yet turned on, and his form silhouetted in the morning light. This image, as he quietly processes the gravity of the moment, stands in contrast to his experience just a few hours later, when he would be speaking from a podium surrounded by the press and lauded by his peers.— Stephanie Mitchell,Harvard chess tournament drew amateurs and masters alikeI first visited Harvard when I was 13, and I was fascinated by the chess players who gathered in the heart of Harvard Square. When I later came to the area for college, I used to sit and play, enjoying the stories of the players from all over the world. Now I find myself racing by the tables between assignments, but every once in a while I am able to stop and watch the matches. During a Community Chess Weekend at the Smith Campus Center, this frame captured Ridvan Sakir, who finished third in the competition, in deep concentration.— Stephanie Mitchell,Harvard first-years participate in the 2019 Annual Day of ServiceThis photo is of first-year students participating in a Day of Service at Winship Elementary School in Brighton, painting a rainbow in the girls’ bathroom. I shot multiple frames of this scene, most from the side with students’ faces visible, but gravitated toward the back, wanting to include all the different-colored paint cans in my frame. The different colors of paint, as well as the diversity of the students, reinforce the theme of inclusivity that the rainbow represents.— Jon Chase,Frames of mind:  A window onto Harvard’s campusFrosted squares on Pound Hall windows accent fall foliage at Harvard Law School. I am interested in photographing spontaneously to create a dialogue with other artistic media, such as pop art. I hope that my photographs can ask questions that give the viewer a chance to see the world differently. The meaning of a photograph is also affected by being showcased with other images. For example, the dozens of gray squares in this photo contrast with the array of rainbow flags in the next image.The Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health pays tribute to diversity inside Building 2 by displaying the bisexual flag (from left), the pride flag, and the transgender flag — all with a description of their artistic origins. With my camera, I try to explore layers of visual and cultural meaning to make photographs that foster social and environmental change. Here, I saw a researcher passing between translucent flags while ascending a staircase back to his laboratory.— Kris Snibbe,An ode to autumn as cold weather descendsI had been photographing in the Yard trying to wrap up a photo gallery about fall on campus. I noticed the multi-colored chairs clustered together, almost conjuring a group having an intimate conversation. The fallen red and yellow leaves littering the entire scene seemed like confetti marking the end of a party. I wanted a human figure to complete the feeling of people leaving the chairs behind, and as luck would have it, a stroller with an umbrella walked past, and I had my shot.— Jon Chaselast_img read more

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Justice Friday lecture explores implications of Title IX for LGBTQ students

first_imgThis week’s installment of the College’s Justice Fridays lecture series focused on explaining how Title IX protects students of all gender identities and sexual orientation from sex-based discrimination.Saint Mary’s senior Bri O’Brien led the conversation, focusing on how Title IX can benefit the LGBTQ community on college campuses. She offered a concise explanation of how Title IX works.“Title IX extends to claims of discrimination based on gender identity or failure to conform to stereotypical notions of masculinity or femininity,” O’Brien said.“Men, women, transgender students anybody of any gender identity or sexual orientation cannot be discriminated on that basis because that all originates from sex.”“You cannot discriminate on the basis of sex in any educational institutions that receive public funds … from that they [Title IX] elaborate onto sex-based harassment, gender based harassment, sexual violence and sexual harassment,” O’Brien said.While Saint Mary’s does an excellent job informing students of their rights when sexual assault occurs, O’Brien said, there is less focus on how Title IX protects the LGBTQ community.“We [Saint Mary’s] don’t really touch on the LGBTQ part of it,” O’Brien said.She said administrators should be trained and treat same-sex sexual harassment the same as heterosexual sexual harassment.“Recently, the [Office of Civil Rights’s] elaborated guidance on Title IX specifically said that administrators, faculty, staff, Title IX coordinators, deputy coordinators, mandated reporters; all these people have to have specified training on how to work with LGBTQ students.“When it comes to same sex assault, Title IX mandates the process should be the same for same sex assaults as it is for non-same sex assaults. So that means it shouldn’t look any different, you shouldn’t be asked any different questions,” O’Brien said.Junior Sarah Bastian said she had a better understanding of Title IX after the talk.“I learned that Title IX applies to every single student, regardless of sexual identity, who is a victim of sexual assault or harassment,” she said. “Also, there are women here at Saint Mary’s who sexually harass fellow students, but that is not discussed. The discussions mostly revolve around women being victimized by men. Neither situation should be ignored.”O’Brien concluded the talk by advising students to know their rights and to let the administration know they know their rights under Title IX to avoid miscommunication.Bastian said a basic knowledge of Title IX would enable students to more effectively navigate the system should they become a victim of sexual discrimination or harassment.“If you don’t know your rights, you cannot fully stand up for yourself,” she said.The Justice Friday lecture series takes place every Friday from 12 p.m. to 12:50 p.m. in Conference Room A and B of the Student Center.Tags: Justice Fridays, Title IXlast_img read more

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Get a Glimpse of the Glamour Cat! Nicole Scherzinger in London’s Cats

first_imgFirst she was a Pussycat Doll—now she’s the Glamour Cat! Nicole Scherzinger is prowling to the West End in the new revival of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Cats. UK’s Daily Mail released some sizzling photos of the new star sporting a short, sleek Grizabella wig, a chic fur coat and fur-covered fingerless gloves. Ready to see the new revival? Catch the limited engagement of Cats from December 6 through February 28, 2015 at the London Palladium, with opening night scheduled for December 11. Meow! View Commentslast_img

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Computers in Farming

first_imgIf a farmer ever needed a reason to buy a computer for the farm, he’ll get it at AgShowcase ’96. Practical uses, networks and gee-whiz ideas will show off the technologychanging the future of farming.The Showcase is Saturday, June 29, at the Rural Development Center in Tifton. It startsat 9 a.m. and ends at 4 p.m. And it features the latest from Georgia agriculturalcolleges.The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences cosponsorsthe showcase with Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College and Fort Valley State College.The event showcases the work of Georgia Extension Service specialists and agents andGeorgia Agricultural Experiment Station researchers. It brings academic and researchadvances to the heart of Georgia farming.Many displays will use computers to explain their messages. One will show how programspredict crop yields. Others will detail software that supports farmers.Two new CDs will be on display. One includes 200 full-color pictures of forest insectsand damage. The other is the Extension Service’s ‘Pest Control Handbook.'”We’ll showhow to get the Extension CDs and use them,” said Don Hamilton, an Extension Service computer specialist.Hamilton will show how farmers can use the World Wide Web, too. He’ll show how they can findthe Extension Service Web page.”Our World Wide Web site has been accessed 50,000 timessince last June,”Hamilton said. “It’s averaging around 4,500 times a week.”The site has farm publications and news stories, names and phone numbers of countyagents and specialists, and much more.Ever see a GSAMS classroom? You can at the showcase. The (Georgia Statewide Academicand Medical System) classroom offers two-way voice and video links among up to sevensites.”This technology carries graphics, charts, photos andvideo,” said Bob Molleur, an Extension Service visual communications specialist.”It’s a wayof teaching in several remote sites at once.”GSAMS has 300 such classrooms in schools, libraries and state agencies. It has 59 inhospitals linked to the Medical College of Georgia. In the first three months this year,GSAMS carried 325 conferences in 900 sites.last_img read more

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Ag Forecast 2008

first_imgUniversity of GeorgiaAnyone who wants the latest information about crop prices, pending U.S. farm and energy policies, weather forecasts or water conservation should attend at least one of the five meetings planned across Georgia the week of Jan. 28.The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences will host its second annual Ag Forecast Breakfast Series 7 a.m. -10 a.m. Jan. 28 in Rome, Jan. 29 in Gainesville, Jan. 30 in Statesboro, Jan. 31 in Tifton and Feb. 1 in Macon. Participants will hear from farm experts and get to ask them questions. They’ll receive the 2008 Agricultural Price and Profit Planning Book, a detailed analysis of each major Georgia product, and get breakfast, too.Co-sponsors are Georgia Farm Bureau, Georgia Department of Agriculture and the Georgia Agribusiness Council. Registration costs $35 per person or $250 for a table of eight. For more information or to register, call (706) 542-2434 or visit the Web site www.GeorgiaAgForecast.com.last_img read more

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To the top

first_imgBy Stephanie Schupska University of Georgia From bicycle-powered light bulbs to algae bubbling in plastic bags, 30 universities showed off their biofuels research under a circus-size tent at the second annual Bioenergy Awareness Days in Washington June 19.The three-day event took place at both the Whitten Federal Building of the U.S. Department of Agriculture and at the National Arboretum. Close to 80 exhibitors were featured. The University of Georgia is among 13 winners of the Grand Challenge, an honor that allowed them to exhibit at both locations. The title recognizes universities for their leadership in renewable energy research, teaching and outreach and for their collaborations with other private or public institutions.“The Grand Challenge was looking and challenging universities to work with other universities and industries and other institutions to develop a vision on how to meet the energy concern in the next few years,” said Gale Buchanan, USDA under secretary for research, education and economics and former dean of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. The USDA and the 25x’25 Alliance sponsored the challenge. 25x’25 is a coalition of leaders from agricultural, forestry and renewable energy communities. They are committed to providing 25 percent of the nation’s energy from farms and forests by 2025. The exhibit dates were chosen for their proximity to the summer solstice on June 21, the longest day of the year. Researchers from UGA’s Athens and Tifton campuses hauled algae, chicken fat, wood pellets, a remote-controlled tractor and sugar cane through Georgia, the Carolinas, Virginia, D.C. and finally Maryland to participate in the event at the National Arboretum. For three days they faced cameras and fielded questions like, “Chicken fat? Really?” Mention algae and chicken fat together, and visitors, reporters and dignitaries alike headed eagerly toward UGA’s lab-like display, which was set up in a walk-through trailer. K.C. Das, a CAES associate professor and director of UGA’s Biorefining and Carbon Cycling Program, estimates algae will be commercially viable as a source for biofuel in about five years. Algae have the potential for producing 2,000 gallons of oil per acre annually. In comparison, soybeans produce 48 gallons an acre. Corn produces 18 gallons an acre. Much of the research UGA displayed is already being put to commercial use. In north Georgia chicken fat is manufactured as biodiesel. Pellets made from both peanut hulls and Georgia’s timber scraps are being burned for fuel. The UGA remote-controlled “sipping” tractor runs on both ethanol and solar power and earns its name by sipping just enough fuel to keep going. And sugar cane is just one of many crops UGA researchers are putting through the grind in search of better biomass. More than 80 researchers and economists are working on basic and applied biofuels research, collaborating through UGA’s Biofuels, Biopower and Biomaterials Initiative (B3I). From rotten fruit to cotton stalks, they’re searching for the second generation of biofuels that will produce energy without eating up valuable food crops.(Stephanie Schupska is a news editor with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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